Feed aggregator

Costales: Ubuntu Phone: 1 Week in the street & +1000 apps now!

Planet Ubuntu - Sun, 03/22/2015 - 11:19
The first Ubuntu Phones arrived earlier this week to the buyers... But in the Store are over 1000 apps now!

And the application numer 1000 is Marvel Scope!



Do you have 5'? Then, you can create a scope or webapp!
Do you have 1'? Then, you can create a webapp!

Rhonda D'Vine: Yasmo

Planet Ubuntu - Sun, 03/22/2015 - 11:19

Friday the 13th was my day. In so many different ways. I received a package which was addressed to Rhonda D'Vine with a special hoodie in it. The person at the post office desk asked me whether it was for my partner, my response was a (cowardly) "no, it's my pseudonym" but that settled any further questions and I got my package.

Later I received an email which made me hyper happy (but which I can't share right now, potentially later).

In the evening there was the WortMacht FemSlam (WordMight FemSlam) poetry slam to which the host asked me to attend just the day before. I was hyper nervous about it. The room was fully packed, there were even quite some people who didn't have a place to sit and were standing at the side. I presented Mermaids because I wasn't able to write anything new on the topic. One would think I am attached enough to the poem by now to not be nervous about it, but it was the environment that made my legs shake like hell while presenting. Gladly I hope it wasn't possible to see it enough under my skirt, but given that it was the first time that I presented it in my home town instead of the "anonymous" internet made me extra anxious. In the end I ended up in place 5 of 7 attendees, which I consider a success given that it was the only text presented in English and not in typical poetry slam style.
(Small addition to the last part: I've been yesterday to the Free Hugs Vienna event at the Schloss Schönbrunn, and one of the people I hugged told me I know you, I've seen you at the FemSlam!. That was extra sweet. :))

I'm happy that I was notified about the FemSlam on such short notice, it was a great experience. So today's entry goes out to the host of that event. This is about Yasmo. One can just be envious about what she already accomplished in her still young life. And she is definitely someone to watch out for in the years to come. I have to excuse to my readers who don't understand German yet again, but I'll get back to something English next time, I promise. :)

  • Kein Platz für Zweifel: The title track from her last album.
  • Wer hat Angst vorm weißen Mann: Most straight-to-the-point line of the lyrics is Wie kann es sein, dass es immer noch diesen Jolly-Buntstift gibt, der "Hautfarbe" heißt?" (How is it possible that there is still this jolly crayon called "colour of the skin"?)
  • Wo kommst du her?: Not a song but one of her great slam poetry texts that I love since I first heard it.

Like always, enjoy!

/music | permanent link | Comments: 0 |

Oliver Grawert: An alternate approach to Ubuntu Phone Web App containers

Planet Ubuntu - Sun, 03/22/2015 - 09:56

It bothers me since a while that Web Apps on the Ubuntu Phone have their back button at the top left of the screen. It bothers me even more that the toolbar constantly collapses and expands during browsing … most of the time it does that for me when I just want to tap on a link. The page content suddenly moves 50px up or down…

Since Dekko exists on the Ubuntu Phone I became a heavy user of it for reading my mails and I really fell in love with the new bottom menu that Dan Chapman integrated so nicely (based on the circle menu work from Nekhelesh Ramananthan)

So this weekend it struck me to simply combine a WebView with this menu work to ge a shiny bottom navigation menu. I grabbed the recent google plus app from Szymon Waliczek, the latest source of Dekko and some bits from the webbrowser-app tree to combine them into a new webapp-container like framework.

You can find an experimental G+ click package (one that surely wins the contest for the ugliest icon) here.

I pushed the code to launchpad together with a README that describes how you can use it in your own WebApp, you can branch it with:

bzr branch lp:~ogra/junk/alternate-webapp-container


Ronnie Tucker: MakuluLinux Cinnamon 8.1

Planet Ubuntu - Sat, 03/21/2015 - 23:38

MakuluLinux Cinnamon is a freely distributed, easy-to-use, easy-to-install, portable and open source desktop-oriented operating system based on the award-winning Debian GNU/Linux distribution and built around the beautiful, lightweight and modern Cinnamon desktop environment.

Its claimed as a very first x64 Edition for Makulu Linux family. This release is special for so many reasons, It is sure to mark a major milestone, not just for Makulu, but considering what is inside, the whole of the linux world.

Source:http://linux.softpedia.com/get/Linux-Distributions/MakuluLinux-Cinnamon-103650.shtml
Submitted by: Marius Nestor

Kubuntu Wire: Ten Years of Kubuntu hits Hacker News

Planet Ubuntu - Sat, 03/21/2015 - 09:18

You can read and add your reactions at ycombinator, and add your vote. Also note that the full LWN article is now freely available,

Ronnie Tucker: Save and Recover Data From Crashed Disks With ddrescue Command Like a Pro

Planet Ubuntu - Fri, 03/20/2015 - 23:37

Horrible event that really want to avoided is data loss because of broken harddisks. But, you still can do something with your harddisks if that event occurs. By utilizing ddrescue, a good tools for save your data, you still can get back your data.

GNU ddrescue is a program that copies data from one file or block device (hard disk, cd/dvd-rom, etc) to another, it is a tool to help you to save data from crashed partition i.e. it is a data recovery tool. It tries to read and if it fails it will go on with the next sectors, where tools like dd will fail. If the copying process is interrupted by the user it is possible to continue at any position later. It can copy backwards.

Source:http://www.cyberciti.biz/tips/how-do-i-save-recover-data-from-crashed-disks-with-dd-and-ddrescue-command.html

Submitted by: NixCraft

 

The Fridge: Interview with Daniel Holbach of the Ubuntu Community Council

Planet Ubuntu - Fri, 03/20/2015 - 11:59

The Ubuntu Community Council is the primary community (i.e., non-technical) governance body for the Ubuntu project. In this series of 7 interviews, we go behind the scenes with the community members who were elected in 2013 serve on this council with Mark Shuttleworth.

In this, our fifth interview, we talk with Daniel Holbach who shares some details about his work at Canonical, projects he’s been involved with in the Ubuntu community and some wisdom for newcomers to Ubuntu.

What do you do for a career?

I work for Canonical and will celebrate my 10th work anniversary later this year. I still enjoy it a lot. I learned loads, got to know many great people and made many new friends. Back in the early days I worked alongside Sébastien Bacher. The two of us basically were the “Desktop team”. Although I was quite used to working with our developer community beforehand, at some stage Canonical recognised Community work formally as something which deserved its own team. This is where I still am and still what I like a lot.

What was your first computing experience?

At home we always had computers as far as I can remember. I remember several Apple II models both at home or my dad’s work office I “typed” on when I was maybe four or five years old. From thereon I played on computers, or had my dad show me what he was working on. Some time later I learned a bit of programming, when I was maybe ten. Back then most of my programming consisted of changing small bits in games written in Basic or Pascal or copying stuff from “code listings” from computer magazines.

How long have you been involved with Ubuntu? And how long on the Ubuntu Community Council?

I got to know Michael Vogt through a friend we had in common when I was studying in Dortmund. One day in 2004 he said “I’m going to work on this thing based on Debian, do you want to try it?” Because I had a bit of spare time on my hands and was welcoming any distraction (I was working on my thesis back then), I said “Of course”. Hours later I had an invitation from Jeff Waugh in my Inbox. I upgraded my Debian machine to Ubuntu and was immediately hooked. Looking back, I think it was a mixture of both the heavy emphasis on new social standards in the open source world plus the willingness of many good developers to answer my questions which got me involved.

If Launchpad is not lying, I have been part of the CC since May 2007.

What are some of the projects you’ve worked on in Ubuntu over the years?

Many. I’ll just try to quickly mention a few which immediately come up in my mind:

  • A bunch of websites: Harvest, the LoCo Team Portal, the Packaging Guide, lately mostly developer.ubuntu.com and lots of graphs Jono made me do.
  • I was part of the planning of many initiatives like the new software store, some of our development/governance processes.
    Fun things like our 24h Ubuntu Community team marathon.
  • I’ve been privileged to work with many great people in many many teams, be it QA, documentation, our development teams, internal teams in Canonical, customers and many more.
What is your focus in Ubuntu today?

Lately I worked quite a bit on documentation for app developers. This was a very interesting experience. Basically our team was taking the input from the SDK team, the various Unity development teams and worked together with them and many others to come up with a story which app developers could understand and would enjoy to be part of. This resulted in a new developer.ubuntu.com site, which today is translatable and will soon be more closely tied to API docs and a snippets database. I worked with Chinese translators, helped with formatting, contributed some fixes to the site, worked with development teams to get last minute bugs fixed and created some training materials. It’s insanely gratifying to see developers jump in and write apps out of the blue, especially for a phone which is just now being sold online. Nuts!

Now I just worked on a help app for Ubuntu devices, and soon I hope to look a bit more at snappy, core and Ubuntu things.

Do you contribute to other free/open source projects? Which ones?

Not so much lately. For some time I contributed to xwax, as I was using it to DJ, but right now, there’s nothing to fix in it – it just works great.

If you were to give a newcomer some advice about getting involved with Ubuntu, what would it be?

Find something you’re interested. Something you’d like to help with, extend, change or fix. Don’t be shy, ask around how you can help, which docs you should have a look at. Start with small contributions, ask how to get them deployed/integrated, don’t give up too easily. Sometimes the people you’re asking are working on something differently and might not know the answer or sometimes it just takes a bit longer. Don’t let yourself be discouraged. Ubuntu people are a lot of fun to hang out with. Join a few meetings, chat with your team mates, be proactive, propose a hangout or a skype session to discuss things. Ubuntu is a very social undertaking.

Do you have any other comments else you wish to share with the community?

Ubuntu is in constant change, just like the world we live in. There are always new experiments, new things to be tried out, new challenges. That’s why the focus of people also changes quite a bit. Change never comes lightly and also comes at a cost in communities. Some things didn’t change over time though: Ubuntu is still free, open source, it’s there for everyone, very social and in the center of everything IT: desktop, laptops, servers, cloud, phones, tablets, IoT. I’m very impressed with where we are today.

New to this series? Check out our previous two Community Council interviews:

Interview with Daniel Holbach of the Ubuntu Community Council

The Fridge - Fri, 03/20/2015 - 11:59

The Ubuntu Community Council is the primary community (i.e., non-technical) governance body for the Ubuntu project. In this series of 7 interviews, we go behind the scenes with the community members who were elected in 2013 serve on this council with Mark Shuttleworth.

In this, our fifth interview, we talk with Daniel Holbach who shares some details about his work at Canonical, projects he’s been involved with in the Ubuntu community and some wisdom for newcomers to Ubuntu.

What do you do for a career?

I work for Canonical and will celebrate my 10th work anniversary later this year. I still enjoy it a lot. I learned loads, got to know many great people and made many new friends. Back in the early days I worked alongside Sébastien Bacher. The two of us basically were the “Desktop team”. Although I was quite used to working with our developer community beforehand, at some stage Canonical recognised Community work formally as something which deserved its own team. This is where I still am and still what I like a lot.

What was your first computing experience?

At home we always had computers as far as I can remember. I remember several Apple II models both at home or my dad’s work office I “typed” on when I was maybe four or five years old. From thereon I played on computers, or had my dad show me what he was working on. Some time later I learned a bit of programming, when I was maybe ten. Back then most of my programming consisted of changing small bits in games written in Basic or Pascal or copying stuff from “code listings” from computer magazines.

How long have you been involved with Ubuntu? And how long on the Ubuntu Community Council?

I got to know Michael Vogt through a friend we had in common when I was studying in Dortmund. One day in 2004 he said “I’m going to work on this thing based on Debian, do you want to try it?” Because I had a bit of spare time on my hands and was welcoming any distraction (I was working on my thesis back then), I said “Of course”. Hours later I had an invitation from Jeff Waugh in my Inbox. I upgraded my Debian machine to Ubuntu and was immediately hooked. Looking back, I think it was a mixture of both the heavy emphasis on new social standards in the open source world plus the willingness of many good developers to answer my questions which got me involved.

If Launchpad is not lying, I have been part of the CC since May 2007.

What are some of the projects you’ve worked on in Ubuntu over the years?

Many. I’ll just try to quickly mention a few which immediately come up in my mind:

  • A bunch of websites: Harvest, the LoCo Team Portal, the Packaging Guide, lately mostly developer.ubuntu.com and lots of graphs Jono made me do.
  • I was part of the planning of many initiatives like the new software store, some of our development/governance processes.
    Fun things like our 24h Ubuntu Community team marathon.
  • I’ve been privileged to work with many great people in many many teams, be it QA, documentation, our development teams, internal teams in Canonical, customers and many more.
What is your focus in Ubuntu today?

Lately I worked quite a bit on documentation for app developers. This was a very interesting experience. Basically our team was taking the input from the SDK team, the various Unity development teams and worked together with them and many others to come up with a story which app developers could understand and would enjoy to be part of. This resulted in a new developer.ubuntu.com site, which today is translatable and will soon be more closely tied to API docs and a snippets database. I worked with Chinese translators, helped with formatting, contributed some fixes to the site, worked with development teams to get last minute bugs fixed and created some training materials. It’s insanely gratifying to see developers jump in and write apps out of the blue, especially for a phone which is just now being sold online. Nuts!

Now I just worked on a help app for Ubuntu devices, and soon I hope to look a bit more at snappy, core and Ubuntu things.

Do you contribute to other free/open source projects? Which ones?

Not so much lately. For some time I contributed to xwax, as I was using it to DJ, but right now, there’s nothing to fix in it – it just works great.

If you were to give a newcomer some advice about getting involved with Ubuntu, what would it be?

Find something you’re interested. Something you’d like to help with, extend, change or fix. Don’t be shy, ask around how you can help, which docs you should have a look at. Start with small contributions, ask how to get them deployed/integrated, don’t give up too easily. Sometimes the people you’re asking are working on something differently and might not know the answer or sometimes it just takes a bit longer. Don’t let yourself be discouraged. Ubuntu people are a lot of fun to hang out with. Join a few meetings, chat with your team mates, be proactive, propose a hangout or a skype session to discuss things. Ubuntu is a very social undertaking.

Do you have any other comments else you wish to share with the community?

Ubuntu is in constant change, just like the world we live in. There are always new experiments, new things to be tried out, new challenges. That’s why the focus of people also changes quite a bit. Change never comes lightly and also comes at a cost in communities. Some things didn’t change over time though: Ubuntu is still free, open source, it’s there for everyone, very social and in the center of everything IT: desktop, laptops, servers, cloud, phones, tablets, IoT. I’m very impressed with where we are today.

New to this series? Check out our previous two Community Council interviews:

Brian Murray: Stable Release Update for apport-noui

Planet Ubuntu - Fri, 03/20/2015 - 09:27

As I hinted at in my last post, apport-noui, which will enable automatic crash reporting, is now available in the -proposed repository for Trusty. If you want to test it follow the instructions in the SRU bug report. Otherwise, it will be made available in -updates next week.

Ronnie Tucker: State of VoIP in Linux

Planet Ubuntu - Thu, 03/19/2015 - 23:36

Like most people, I find myself using the same VoIP options everyone else is using. Thankfully, these days there are far more options available than what we might think.

One of the popular VoIP applications in Linux is Skype which coming from any other platforms, Linux VoIP clients often find themselves being compared to Skype. Foss advocates are usually quick to point out the flaws in trusting Skype with your voice calls, yet the fact is that this is what most people use. There are more than one alternative applications for VoIP communications in Linux.

Today, I’ll look at these options and also explore up-and-coming alternatives as well.

Source:http://www.datamation.com/open-source/state-of-voip-in-linux.html
Submitted by: Matt Hartley

Carla Sella: Planet Ubuntu-it has it's own Ubuntu Phone webapp

Planet Ubuntu - Thu, 03/19/2015 - 13:59
Planet Ubuntu-itPlanet Ubuntu-it


























This is simply awesome!
I cannot believe how simple it is to create your webapp for Ubuntu Phone.
You just have to go to this web site: https://developer.ubuntu.com/webapp-generator
Fill in the fileds and click on the submit button.







You will get a click package downloaded to you PC.
This click package can be installed on your Phone for testing, you just have to connect  your phone to your PC with a USB cord and type in terminal:

$ adb push click-package-name /tmp
$ adb shell
$ cd /tmp
$ sudo -u phablet pkcon install-local --allow-untrusted  click-package-name

After checking everything is ok with it you can then publish it to the Ubuntu App store going to: http://developer.ubuntu.com.

Jani Monoses: Docker image for cross compiling go-qml apps

Planet Ubuntu - Thu, 03/19/2015 - 09:08
Cross compiling Go packages to ARM is easy unless they rely on C libraries via cgo, in which case C cross-compilers and libraries built for the target are required on the host, and the invocation is not straightforward at all.

Dimitri's post shows a way to do it using armhf chroots, and inspired by it I put together a docker image that does slightly more and can be used as if it were a simple command. The image uses a Go
package built from a PPA , since the one in the archive does not have a CGO enabled ARM cross compiler.

Install the image

    $ docker pull janimo/goqml-cross

Set up an alias for convenience

   alias goqml-cross='docker run --rm -it -v $(pwd):/home/developer -v $GOPATH:/home/developer/gopath -w $(pwd|sed "s,$GOPATH,/home/developer/gopath,") janimo/goqml-cross'

Go to the source tree

  $ cd $GOPATH/src/your/package

Run the container as if it were the go tool (which in fact it is, /usr/bin/go being the docker container's default entry point)

 $ goqml-cross version
 $ goqml-cross build -i

This will reuse your host environment's GOPATH and place the resulting Go packages under $GOPATH/pkg/linux_arm/ to be available in subsequent fast incremental builds.

Check the docker registry for details on how to use it and the project on github if you want to build your image from source.

Ubuntu Podcast from the UK LoCo: S08E02 – The Oasis of the Living Dead - Ubuntu Podcast

Planet Ubuntu - Thu, 03/19/2015 - 02:59

We’re back with the second episode of Season Eight!

It’s Episode Two of the Ubuntu Podcast! Alan Pope, Laura Cowen and Mark Johnson are connected and speaking to your brain.

Please update your podcast download clients with our new feed URLs:-

http://feeds.ubuntupodcast.org/mp3
http://feeds.ubuntupodcast.org/ogg

In this week’s show:

  • We discuss first opinions of the brand new Ubuntu Phone

  • We share some Command Line Lurve which is a command line interface for testing internet bandwidth using speedtest.net

speedtest-cli

You can find it on Github

Example:

alan@deep-thought:$ speedtest-cli Retrieving speedtest.net configuration... Retrieving speedtest.net server list... Testing from Virgin Media (1.2.3.4)... Selecting best server based on latency... Hosted by UK Broadband/PCCW (Ealing) [41.10 km]: 17.462 ms Testing download speed.................Download: 93.11 Mbit/s Testing upload speed........................Upload: 5.89 Mbit/s
  • And we explain a bit about what’s changed for this new season. Let us know what you think at our new email address: show@ubuntupodcast.org

That’s all for this season, but while we are off the air, please send your comments and suggestions to: show@ubuntupodcast.org
Join us on IRC in #ubuntu-podcast on Freenode
Follow us on Twitter
Find our Facebook Fan Page
Follow us on Google+

Ronnie Tucker: GTK+ Wayland Now Supports HiDPI Cursors

Planet Ubuntu - Wed, 03/18/2015 - 23:34

Matthias Clasen has released the latest GTK+ 3.15 development release that’s near final and about ready to be named GTK+ 3.16.

Yesterday’s GTK+ 3.15.12 release brings improvements to the GtkCellRendererPixbuf, GtkEntry and GtkMenuButton alterations, and the GTK+ Wayland back-end now has support for HiDPI cursors. There’s also various bug-fixes in GTK+ 3.15.12 like crash fixes and Pixman warnings. The official changes can be seen outlined via this Git commit.

Source: http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?page=news_item&px=GTK-3.15.12-Released
Submitted by: Michael Larabel

Adam Stokes: Configuring VLANs in MAAS node deployment

Planet Ubuntu - Wed, 03/18/2015 - 21:42

Since Debian installer doesn’t have the ability to configure vlans we need to make any additional network modifications within the preseed/late_command stage. If you aren’t familiar with vlan or would like some more details on setting it up take a look at Ubuntu vlan wiki page. Also I don’t have the hardware to test the actual switching so hopefully someone will read this and let me know what I’ve missed. I checked into gns3 but it is my understanding it would be impossible to emulate the switching that Cisco hardware would.

Assumptions

Yea assumptions are baad, however, this article assumes you have an interface eth0 that supports vlan tagging (802.1q) and that a hardware switch exists that has been configured for vlans.

Preseed naming conventions in MAAS

The order in which MAAS loads a preseed file is seen below:

1 2 3 4 5 6{prefix}_{node_architecture}_{node_subarchitecture}_{release}_{node_name} {prefix}_{node_architecture}_{node_subarchitecture}_{release} {prefix}_{node_architecture}_{node_subarchitecture} {prefix}_{node_architecture} {prefix} 'generic' Note:

If you wish to keep your distro provided preseeds in-tact and use an alternative you could always name a new preseed with something like amd64_generic_precise and when deploying your nodes with the precise image it would pick up that preseed instead of generic. More information at How preseeds work

Modifying the preseeds for vlan support

The preseeds are located within /etc/maas/preseeds. For now the only preseed files we are concerned with is preseed_master and generic.

Opening up preseed_master we see a typical preseed configuration and scrolling to the bottom you’ll see:

1 2# Post scripts. {{self.post_scripts}}

This method is exposed as part of the Tempita template engine which we’ll see defined in our generic template next.

Opening generic template we’ll see something like the below:

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28{{inherit "preseed_master"}} {{def proxy}} d-i mirror/country string manual d-i mirror/http/hostname string {{ports_archive_hostname}} d-i mirror/http/directory string {{ports_archive_directory}} {{if http_proxy }} d-i mirror/http/proxy string {{http_proxy}} {{else}} d-i mirror/http/proxy string http://{{server_host}}:8000/ {{endif}} {{enddef}} {{def client_packages}} d-i pkgsel/include string cloud-init openssh-server python-software-properties vim avahi-daemon server^ {{enddef}} {{def preseed}} {{preseed_data}} {{enddef}} {{def post_scripts}} # Executes late command and disables PXE. d-i preseed/late_command string true && \ in-target sh -c 'f=$1; shift; echo $0 > $f && chmod 0440 $f $*' 'ubuntu ALL=(ALL) NOPASSWD: ALL' /etc/sudoers.d/maas && \ in-target wget --no-proxy "{{node_disable_pxe_url|escape.shell}}" --post-data "{{node_disable_pxe_data|escape.shell}}" -O /dev/null && \ true {{enddef}}

Most of this should be self explanatory as this basically outlines the typical usage of most template engines. We inherit 'preseed_master' which calls self and we provide our method definitions with {{def <method>}}. Scroll down your generic preseed file and locate {{def post_scripts}}.

This definition is what’s called from our preseed_master configuration and where we’ll add our vlan options. We’ll make a call out to a vlansetup file hosted on the same server as maas, usually found in /var/www/.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11{{def post_scripts}} # Executes late command and disables PXE. d-i preseed/late_command string true && \ in-target sh -c 'f=$1; shift; echo $0 > $f && chmod 0440 $f $*' 'ubuntu ALL=(ALL) NOPASSWD: ALL' /etc/sudoers.d/maas && \ in-target wget --no-proxy "{{node_disable_pxe_url|escape.shell}}" --post-data "{{node_disable_pxe_data|escape.shell}}" -O /dev/null && \ wget -O /tmp/vlansetup http://192.168.122.206/vlansetup && \ chmod +x /tmp/vlansetup && \ sh -x /tmp/vlansetup && \ rm -f /tmp/vlansetup && \ true {{enddef}}

Our vlansetup file would look something like

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15#!/bin/sh /bin/apt-install vlan echo "8021q" >> /target/etc/modules cat >>/target/etc/network/interfaces<<EOF auto vlan5 auto vlan100 iface vlan5 inet static address 10.0.0.18 netmask 255.255.255.0 vlan-raw-device eth0 iface vlan100 inet static address 192.168.66.118 netmask 255.255.255.0 vlan-raw-device eth0 EOF

After the node is deployed you should see something like the following in your syslog output.

1 2 3 4Set name-type for VLAN subsystem. Should be visible in /proc/net/vlan/config Added VLAN with VID == 5 to IF -:eth0:- Set name-type for VLAN subsystem. Should be visible in /proc/net/vlan/config Added VLAN with VID == 100 to IF -:eth0:-

And /proc/net/vlan/config should look like

1 2 3 4 5ubuntu@node1:~$ sudo cat /proc/net/vlan/config VLAN Dev name | VLAN ID Name-Type: VLAN_NAME_TYPE_PLUS_VID_NO_PAD vlan5 | 5 | eth0 vlan100 | 100 | eth0

Last but not least ifconfig reports

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35eth0 Link encap:Ethernet HWaddr 52:54:00:2a:37:ac inet addr:192.168.122.144 Bcast:192.168.122.255 Mask:255.255.255.0 inet6 addr: fe80::5054:ff:fe2a:37ac/64 Scope:Link UP BROADCAST RUNNING MULTICAST MTU:1500 Metric:1 RX packets:148 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 frame:0 TX packets:227 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 carrier:0 collisions:0 txqueuelen:1000 RX bytes:20214 (20.2 KB) TX bytes:34006 (34.0 KB) lo Link encap:Local Loopback inet addr:127.0.0.1 Mask:255.0.0.0 inet6 addr: ::1/128 Scope:Host UP LOOPBACK RUNNING MTU:16436 Metric:1 RX packets:0 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 frame:0 TX packets:0 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 carrier:0 collisions:0 txqueuelen:0 RX bytes:0 (0.0 B) TX bytes:0 (0.0 B) vlan5 Link encap:Ethernet HWaddr 52:54:00:2a:37:ac inet addr:10.0.0.18 Bcast:10.0.0.255 Mask:255.255.255.0 inet6 addr: fe80::5054:ff:fe2a:37ac/64 Scope:Link UP BROADCAST RUNNING MULTICAST MTU:1500 Metric:1 RX packets:0 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 frame:0 TX packets:40 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 carrier:0 collisions:0 txqueuelen:0 RX bytes:0 (0.0 B) TX bytes:6600 (6.6 KB) vlan100 Link encap:Ethernet HWaddr 52:54:00:2a:37:ac inet addr:192.168.66.118 Bcast:192.168.66.255 Mask:255.255.255.0 inet6 addr: fe80::5054:ff:fe2a:37ac/64 Scope:Link UP BROADCAST RUNNING MULTICAST MTU:1500 Metric:1 RX packets:0 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 frame:0 TX packets:38 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 carrier:0 collisions:0 txqueuelen:0 RX bytes:0 (0.0 B) TX bytes:6324 (6.3 KB) Thoughts

Of course this could be seen as a hindrance if you have an environment more complex than just assigning vlan tags to eth0. Automating the assignment of vlan’s is probably best done within the installer, however, that feature doesn’t exist. Some things that could be done to lessen the administrative burden would be making use of puppet on the MAAS server and pre-populating the /etc/maas/preseeds/generic file.

Cool tips

If you are running your MAAS instance and nodes within KVM/VirtualBox/etc you could easily pull the IP from the virtual machine if you know the MAC address using something like arp -an. Then either setup puppet to keep your preseeds updated or utilize something like libguestfs to make changes directly within the VM.

Troubleshooting

Installing this on a desktop image with NetworkManager running (first ask yourself why)? Then see this post for a solution to configuring NetworkManager and vlan’s.

Adam Stokes: OpenStack Installer: Customizing the Single Install constraints

Planet Ubuntu - Wed, 03/18/2015 - 21:35

Sometimes our default constraints for a Single Installation isn’t enough. With our latest release it is possible to now configure the service placements with custom constraints.

Below is a fully working config example that you can modify to suit your hardware:

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49install_type: Single placements: controller: assignments: LXC: - nova-cloud-controller - glance - glance-simplestreams-sync - openstack-dashboard - juju-gui - keystone - mysql - neutron-api - neutron-openvswitch - rabbitmq-server - swift-proxy constraints: cpu-cores: 2 mem: 6144 root-disk: 20480 nova-compute-machine-0: assignments: BareMetal: - nova-compute constraints: mem: 4096 root-disk: 40960 quantum-gateway-machine-0: assignments: BareMetal: - quantum-gateway constraints: mem: 2048 root-disk: 20480 swift-storage-machine-0: assignments: BareMetal: - swift-storage constraints: &id001 {} swift-storage-machine-1: assignments: BareMetal: - swift-storage constraints: *id001 swift-storage-machine-2: assignments: BareMetal: - swift-storage constraints: *id001

Looking under the constraints for the controller you can expand on the disk storage, memory, and cpus that will be allocated to that service during deployment.

To make use of this config run:

1$ sudo openstack-install -c config.yaml

It’ll walk you through setting a password and selecting the Single install mode. Once the installer is to the point of deployment it’ll automatically pickup your placements configuration and deploy based on those updated constraints.

Head over to Single installer guide for more information. Also if you find bugs or have a feature request please check out our GitHub project!

Kubuntu Wire: Kubuntu 15.04 Heating up

Planet Ubuntu - Wed, 03/18/2015 - 10:33

 

JR announces that we are getting close the the final beta for Kubuntu Vivid (soon to be 15.04). This is an exciting release, with big changes, including a transition from LightDM to SDDM; Upstart to sytemd; and Plasma 4 to 5. The call to action:

There’s still plenty on the bugs list many of them probably quite easy to fix if you fancy helping out.  Our To Do list has plenty to be done including several that could be classes as junior jobs if you’re wanting to get into free software such as making some new recommended applications for the Muon Discover banner or reviewing the ISO contents to see if anything can be removed and get the size down a little.  We’re in #kubuntu-devel on freenode if you want to say hi.

The Fridge: Ubuntu 10.04 (Lucid Lynx) reaches End of Life on April 30 2015

Planet Ubuntu - Wed, 03/18/2015 - 10:33

Ubuntu announced its 10.04 (Lucid Lynx) release almost 5 years ago, on April 29, 2010. As with the earlier LTS releases, Ubuntu committed to ongoing security and critical fixes for a period of 5 years. The support period is now nearing its end and Ubuntu 10.04 will reach end of life on Thursday, April 30th. At that time, Ubuntu Security Notices will no longer include information or updated packages for Ubuntu 10.04.

The supported upgrade path from Ubuntu 10.04 is via Ubuntu 12.04. Users are encouraged to evaluate and upgrade to our latest 14.04 LTS release via 12.04. Instructions and caveats for the upgrades may be found at https://help.ubuntu.com/community/PreciseUpgrades and https://help.ubuntu.com/community/TrustyUpgrades. Ubuntu 12.04 and 14.04 continue to be actively supported with security updates and select high-impact bug fixes. All announcements of official security updates for Ubuntu releases are sent to the ubuntu-security-announce mailing list, information about which may be found at https://lists.ubuntu.com/mailman/listinfo/ubuntu-security-announce.

Since its launch in October 2004 Ubuntu has become one of the most highly regarded Linux distributions with millions of users in homes, schools, businesses and governments around the world. Ubuntu is Open Source software, costs nothing to download, and users are free to customise or alter their software in order to meet their needs.

Originally posted to the ubuntu-announce mailing list on Wed Mar 18 12:42:08 UTC 2015 by Adam Conrad, on behalf of the Ubuntu Release Team

Ubuntu 10.04 (Lucid Lynx) reaches End of Life on April 30 2015

The Fridge - Wed, 03/18/2015 - 10:33

Ubuntu announced its 10.04 (Lucid Lynx) release almost 5 years ago, on April 29, 2010. As with the earlier LTS releases, Ubuntu committed to ongoing security and critical fixes for a period of 5 years. The support period is now nearing its end and Ubuntu 10.04 will reach end of life on Thursday, April 30th. At that time, Ubuntu Security Notices will no longer include information or updated packages for Ubuntu 10.04.

The supported upgrade path from Ubuntu 10.04 is via Ubuntu 12.04. Users are encouraged to evaluate and upgrade to our latest 14.04 LTS release via 12.04. Instructions and caveats for the upgrades may be found at https://help.ubuntu.com/community/PreciseUpgrades and https://help.ubuntu.com/community/TrustyUpgrades. Ubuntu 12.04 and 14.04 continue to be actively supported with security updates and select high-impact bug fixes. All announcements of official security updates for Ubuntu releases are sent to the ubuntu-security-announce mailing list, information about which may be found at https://lists.ubuntu.com/mailman/listinfo/ubuntu-security-announce.

Since its launch in October 2004 Ubuntu has become one of the most highly regarded Linux distributions with millions of users in homes, schools, businesses and governments around the world. Ubuntu is Open Source software, costs nothing to download, and users are free to customise or alter their software in order to meet their needs.

Originally posted to the ubuntu-announce mailing list on Wed Mar 18 12:42:08 UTC 2015 by Adam Conrad, on behalf of the Ubuntu Release Team

Pages

Subscribe to Ubuntu Arizona LoCo Team aggregator