Feed aggregator

Scott Kitterman: Computer System Security Policy Debate (Follow-up)

Planet Ubuntu - Sat, 04/23/2016 - 15:12

As a follow-up to my recent post on the debate in the US over new encryption restrictions, I thought a short addition might be relevant.  This continues.

There was a recent Congressional hearing on the topic that featured mostly what you would expect.  Police always want access to any possible source of evidence and the tech industry tries to explain that the risks associated with mandates to do so are excessive with grandstanding legislators sprinkled throughout.   What I found interesting (and I use that word with some trepidation as it is still a multi-hour video of a Congressional hearing) is that there was rather less grandstanding and and less absolutism from some parties than I was expecting.

There is overwhelming consensus that these requirements [for exceptional access] are incompatible with good security engineering practice

Dr. Matthew Blaze

The challenge is that political people see everything as a political/policy issue, but this isn’t that kind of issue.  I get particularly frustrated when I read ignorant ramblings like this that dismiss the overwhelming consensus of the people that actually understand what needs to be done as emotional, hysterical obstructionism.  Contrary to what seems to be that author’s point, constructive dialogue and understanding values does nothing to change the technical risks of mandating exceptional access.  Of course the opponents of Feinstein-Burr decry it as technologically illiterate, it is technologically illiterate.

This doesn’t quite rise to the level of that time the Indiana state legislature considered legislating a new value (or in fact multiple values) for the mathematical constant Pi, but it is in the same legislative domain.

Salih Emin: How to search – install – remove, Snap packages in Ubuntu

Planet Ubuntu - Fri, 04/22/2016 - 12:02
In this short video tutorial, we will see how to use the new Snap package manager to search and install/remove Snap packages and some useful commands.

Jonathan Riddell: kver’s definition of anarchy

Planet Ubuntu - Thu, 04/21/2016 - 15:12

This amused me

Possible differences/anarchy may include:

  • Strange chewing noises if inserting a disc.
  • Never finding the correct orientation of USB plugs.
  • Your machine mysteriously moving several inches if you leave the room briefly.
  • Your printer demanding white ink to operate.
  • Small house pets may go missing, tufts of fur in keyboard.
  • Growling noises if holding the power button down.
  • Kate highlighting the PHP ‘die’ command in bold, regardless of setting.
by

Sean Davis: Xubuntu 16.04 LTS “Xenial Xerus” Released

Planet Ubuntu - Thu, 04/21/2016 - 14:48
Here we are again, folks. After six more months of development (two years since the last LTS), we’ve got another fantastic release — Xubuntu 16.04 LTS “Xenial Xerus”! I wanted to find a nice squirrel quote, but it seems most folks have a horrific dislike for the little critters. — Myself, after looking up squirrel […]

Jono Bacon: Dan Ariely on Building More Human Technology, Data, Artificial Intelligence, and More

Planet Ubuntu - Thu, 04/21/2016 - 13:59

Behavioral economics is an exciting skeleton on which to build human systems such as technology and communities.

One of the leading minds in behavioral economics is Dan Ariely, New York Times best-selling author of Predictably Irrational, The Upside Of Irrationality, and frequent TED speaker.

I recently interviewed Dan for my Forbes column to explore how behavioral economics is playing a role in technology, data, artificial intelligence, and preventing online abuse. Predictably, his insight was irrationally interesting. OK, that was a stretch.

Read the piece here

Lubuntu Blog: Lubuntu 16.04 Xenial Xerus LTS released

Planet Ubuntu - Thu, 04/21/2016 - 11:30
Thanks to all the hard work from our contributors, Lubuntu 16.04 LTS has been released! With the codename Xenial Xerus, Lubuntu 16.04 LTS is the 10th release of Lubuntu, and the second long term support release. Lubuntu 16.04 LTS will be supported until April 2019, with three years of support. What is Lubuntu? Lubuntu is […]

Kubuntu: Kubuntu 16.04 LTS Release Anouncement

Planet Ubuntu - Thu, 04/21/2016 - 11:20

The Kubuntu team is excited and delighted to announce the release of Kubuntu 16.04 Xenial Xerus.

This is the first release from the team since we became a completely volunteer group, just after the release of 15.10. Delivering an Long-Term Release (LTS) release is a superb achievement, and testimony to our community’s commitment to Ubuntu and KDE.

Beta-tester feedback has been resounding and positive. This confirms the amazing work that is being undertaken by our upstream KDE community. Plasma 5, KDE Frameworks 5 and all of KDE continue to demonstrate how Free/Libre Open Source Software sets world class standards for innovation, usability and integration.

What can you expect from this latest release?

Our new software center: Plasma Discover brim-full of software to choose from.

The latest KDE PIM with lots of features and fixes Including the latest Akonadi support and integration with MySQL 5.7.

Plasma 5, the next generation of KDE’s desktop has been rewritten to make it smoother to use while retaining the familiar setup.

Kubuntu 16.04 comes with KDE Applications 15.12 containing all your favourite apps from KDE, including Dolphin. Even more applications have been ported to KDE Frameworks 5 but those which aren’t, should fit in seamlessly. For a complete desktop suite of applications we’ve included some non-KDE applications such as LibreOffice 5.1 and Firefox 45.

Keen developer types and friends of Muon Package Manager will be delighted to know that the project has got a new team of maintainers, and a new release just in time for this Kubuntu LTS.

What are you waiting for? Download the ISO from our downloads section, or Upgrade now!

The Kubuntu Podcast team will be reviewing the latest release, and discussing feedback from the community on the next show. More details available in the podcast section.

Please also check out our release notes.

Ubuntu Studio: New Ubuntu Studio Release and New Project Lead!

Planet Ubuntu - Thu, 04/21/2016 - 09:44
New Project Lead In January 2016 we had an election for a new project lead, and the winner was Set Hallström, who will be taking over the project lead position right after this release. He will be continuing for another two years until the next election in 2018. The team of developers has also seen […]

The Fridge: Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) released

Planet Ubuntu - Thu, 04/21/2016 - 09:33

The Ubuntu team is very pleased to announce our sixth long-term support release, Ubuntu 16.04 LTS for Desktop, Server, Cloud, and Core.

Codenamed "Xenial Xerus", 16.04 LTS continues Ubuntu’s proud tradition of integrating the latest and greatest open source technologies into a high-quality, easy-to-use Linux distribution. The team has been hard at work through this cycle, introducing new features and fixing bugs.

Ubuntu 16.04 LTS is the first long-term support release available for the new "s390x" architecture for IBM LinuxONE and z Systems, as well as introducing the new Ubuntu MATE community flavour.

The Linux kernel has been updated to the 4.4.6 longterm maintenance release, with the addition of ZFS-on-Linux, a combination of a volume manager and filesystem which enables efficient snapshots, copy-on-write cloning, continuous integrity checking against data corruption, automatic filesystem repair, and data compression.

Ubuntu Desktop has seen incremental improvements, with newer versions of GTK and Qt, updates to major packages like Firefox and LibreOffice, and stability improvements to Unity.

Ubuntu Server 16.04 LTS includes the Mitaka release of OpenStack, along with the new 2.0 versions of Juju, LXD, and MAAS to save devops teams time and headache when deploying distributed applications – whether on private clouds, public clouds, or on developer laptops.

Ubuntu 16.04 LTS introduces a new application format, the ‘snap’, which can be installed alongside traditional deb packages. These two packaging formats live quite comfortably next to one another and enable Ubuntu to maintain its existing processes for development and updates.

The newest Kubuntu, Lubuntu, Mythbuntu, Ubuntu GNOME, Ubuntu Kylin, Ubuntu MATE, Ubuntu Studio, and Xubuntu are also being released today. More details can be found for these at their individual release notes:

https://wiki.ubuntu.com/XenialXerus/ReleaseNotes#Official_flavours

Maintenance updates will be provided for 5 years for Ubuntu Desktop, Ubuntu Server, Ubuntu Cloud, Ubuntu Core, and Ubuntu Kylin. All the remaining flavours will be supported for 3 years.

To get Ubuntu 16.04 LTS

In order to download Ubuntu 16.04 LTS, visit:

http://www.ubuntu.com/download

Users of Ubuntu 15.10 will be offered an automatic upgrade to 16.04 LTS via Update Manager shortly. Users of 14.04 LTS will be offered the automatic upgrade when 16.04.1 LTS is released, which is scheduled for July 21st. For further information about upgrading, see:

http://www.ubuntu.com/download/desktop/upgrade

As always, upgrades to the latest version of Ubuntu are entirely free of charge.

We recommend that all users read the release notes, which document caveats, workarounds for known issues, as well as more in-depth notes on the release itself. They are available at:

http://wiki.ubuntu.com/XenialXerus/ReleaseNotes

Find out what’s new in this release with a graphical overview:

http://www.ubuntu.com/desktop

http://www.ubuntu.com/desktop/features

If you have a question, or if you think you may have found a bug but aren’t sure, you can try asking in any of the following places:

Help Shape Ubuntu

If you would like to help shape Ubuntu, take a look at the list of ways you can participate at:

http://community.ubuntu.com/contribute

About Ubuntu

Ubuntu is a full-featured Linux distribution for desktops, laptops, netbooks and servers, with a fast and easy installation and regular releases. A tightly-integrated selection of excellent applications is included, and an incredible variety of add-on software is just a few clicks away.

Professional services including support are available from Canonical and hundreds of other companies around the world. For more information about support, visit:

http://www.ubuntu.com/support

More Information

You can learn more about Ubuntu and about this release on our website listed below:

http://www.ubuntu.com

To sign up for future Ubuntu announcements, please subscribe to Ubuntu’s very low volume announcement list at:

http://lists.ubuntu.com/mailman/listinfo/ubuntu-announce

Originally posted to the ubuntu-announce mailing list on Thu Apr 21 16:17:59 UTC 2016 by Adam Conrad, on behalf of the Ubuntu Release Team

Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) released

The Fridge - Thu, 04/21/2016 - 09:33

The Ubuntu team is very pleased to announce our sixth long-term support release, Ubuntu 16.04 LTS for Desktop, Server, Cloud, and Core.

Codenamed "Xenial Xerus", 16.04 LTS continues Ubuntu’s proud tradition of integrating the latest and greatest open source technologies into a high-quality, easy-to-use Linux distribution. The team has been hard at work through this cycle, introducing new features and fixing bugs.

Ubuntu 16.04 LTS is the first long-term support release available for the new "s390x" architecture for IBM LinuxONE and z Systems, as well as introducing the new Ubuntu MATE community flavour.

The Linux kernel has been updated to the 4.4.6 longterm maintenance release, with the addition of ZFS-on-Linux, a combination of a volume manager and filesystem which enables efficient snapshots, copy-on-write cloning, continuous integrity checking against data corruption, automatic filesystem repair, and data compression.

Ubuntu Desktop has seen incremental improvements, with newer versions of GTK and Qt, updates to major packages like Firefox and LibreOffice, and stability improvements to Unity.

Ubuntu Server 16.04 LTS includes the Mitaka release of OpenStack, along with the new 2.0 versions of Juju, LXD, and MAAS to save devops teams time and headache when deploying distributed applications – whether on private clouds, public clouds, or on developer laptops.

Ubuntu 16.04 LTS introduces a new application format, the ‘snap’, which can be installed alongside traditional deb packages. These two packaging formats live quite comfortably next to one another and enable Ubuntu to maintain its existing processes for development and updates.

The newest Kubuntu, Lubuntu, Mythbuntu, Ubuntu GNOME, Ubuntu Kylin, Ubuntu MATE, Ubuntu Studio, and Xubuntu are also being released today. More details can be found for these at their individual release notes:

https://wiki.ubuntu.com/XenialXerus/ReleaseNotes#Official_flavours

Maintenance updates will be provided for 5 years for Ubuntu Desktop, Ubuntu Server, Ubuntu Cloud, Ubuntu Core, and Ubuntu Kylin. All the remaining flavours will be supported for 3 years.

To get Ubuntu 16.04 LTS

In order to download Ubuntu 16.04 LTS, visit:

http://www.ubuntu.com/download

Users of Ubuntu 15.10 will be offered an automatic upgrade to 16.04 LTS via Update Manager shortly. Users of 14.04 LTS will be offered the automatic upgrade when 16.04.1 LTS is released, which is scheduled for July 21st. For further information about upgrading, see:

http://www.ubuntu.com/download/desktop/upgrade

As always, upgrades to the latest version of Ubuntu are entirely free of charge.

We recommend that all users read the release notes, which document caveats, workarounds for known issues, as well as more in-depth notes on the release itself. They are available at:

http://wiki.ubuntu.com/XenialXerus/ReleaseNotes

Find out what’s new in this release with a graphical overview:

http://www.ubuntu.com/desktop

http://www.ubuntu.com/desktop/features

If you have a question, or if you think you may have found a bug but aren’t sure, you can try asking in any of the following places:

Help Shape Ubuntu

If you would like to help shape Ubuntu, take a look at the list of ways you can participate at:

http://community.ubuntu.com/contribute

About Ubuntu

Ubuntu is a full-featured Linux distribution for desktops, laptops, netbooks and servers, with a fast and easy installation and regular releases. A tightly-integrated selection of excellent applications is included, and an incredible variety of add-on software is just a few clicks away.

Professional services including support are available from Canonical and hundreds of other companies around the world. For more information about support, visit:

http://www.ubuntu.com/support

More Information

You can learn more about Ubuntu and about this release on our website listed below:

http://www.ubuntu.com

To sign up for future Ubuntu announcements, please subscribe to Ubuntu’s very low volume announcement list at:

http://lists.ubuntu.com/mailman/listinfo/ubuntu-announce

Originally posted to the ubuntu-announce mailing list on Thu Apr 21 16:17:59 UTC 2016 by Adam Conrad, on behalf of the Ubuntu Release Team

Mythbuntu: Mythbuntu 16.04 Released

Planet Ubuntu - Thu, 04/21/2016 - 09:29
Mythbuntu 16.04 has been released. This is a point release on our 14.04 LTS release. If you are already on 14.04, you can get these same updates via the normal update process. This is our third LTS release and will be supported until shortly after the 18.04 release.The Mythbuntu team would like to thank our ISO testers for helping find critical bugs before release. You guys rock!With this release, we are providing torrents only. It is very important to note that this release is only compatible with MythTV 0.28 systems. The MythTV component of previous Mythbuntu releases can be be upgraded to a compatible MythTV version by using the Mythbuntu Repos. For a more detailed explanation, see here.You can get the Mythbuntu ISO from our downloads page.HighlightsUnderlying system
  • Underlying Ubuntu updates are found here
MythTVWe appreciated all comments and would love to hear what you think. Please make comments to our mailing list, on the forums (with a tag indicating that this is from 16.04 or xenial), or in #ubuntu-mythtv on Freenode. As previously, if you encounter any issues with anything in this release, please file a bug using the Ubuntu bug tool (ubuntu-bug PACKAGENAME) which automatically collects logs and other important system information, or if that is not possible, directly open a ticket on Launchpad (http://bugs.launchpad.net/mythbuntu/16.04/).
Known issues

Daniel Holbach: Ubuntu 16.04 has landed

Planet Ubuntu - Thu, 04/21/2016 - 09:27
Ubuntu 16.04 – yet another LTS?

Ubuntu 16.04 LTS, aka the Xenial Xerus, has just been released. It’s incredible that it’s already the 24th Ubuntu release and the 6th LTS release. If you have been around for a while and need a blast from the past, check out this video:

Click here to view it on youtube. It’s available in /usr/share/example-content on a default desktop install as well.

You would think that after such a long time releases get somewhat inflationary and less important and while I’d very likely always say on release day “yes, this one is the best of all so far”, Ubuntu 16.04 is indeed very special to me.

Snappy snappy snappy

Among the many pieces of goodness to come to your way is the snapd package. It’s installed by default on many flavours of Ubuntu including Ubuntu Desktop and is your snappy connection to myApps.

Snappy Ubuntu Core 2.0 landing just in time for the 16.04 LTS release only happened due to the great and very hard work of many teams and individuals. I also see it as the implementation of lots of feedback we have been getting from third party app developers, ISVs and upstream projects over the years. Basically what all of them wanted was in a nutshell: a solid Ubuntu base, flexibility in handling their app and the relevant stack, independence from distro freezes, dead-simple packaging, bullet-proof upgrades and rollbacks, and an app store model established with the rise of the smartphones. Snappy Ubuntu Core is exactly that and more. What it also brings to Ubuntu is a clear isolation between apps and a universal trust model.

As most of you know, I’ve been trying to teach people how to do packaging for Ubuntu for years and it continued to improve and get easier, but all in all, it still is hard to get right. snapcraft makes this so much easier. It’s just beautiful. If you have been doing some packaging in the past, just take a look at some of the examples.

Landing a well-working and stable snapd with clear-cut and stable set of APIs was the most important aspect, especially considering that almost everyone will be basing their work on 16.04 LTS, which is going to be supported for five years. This includes being able to use snapcraft on the LTS.

Today you can build a snap, upload it to the store using snapcraft upload, having it automatically reviewed and published by the store and Desktop users can install it on their system. This brings you in a position where you can easily share your software with millions of users, without having to wait for somebody to upload it to the distro for you, without having your users add yet another PPA, etc.

So, what’s still missing? Quite a few things actually. Because you have to bundle your dependencies, packages are still quite big. This will change as soon as the specifics of OS and library snaps are figured out. Apart from that many new interfaces will need to be added to make Ubuntu Core really useful and versatile. There are also still a few bugs which need figuring out.

If you generally like what you’re reading here, come and talk to us. Introduce yourselves, talk to us and we’ll figure out if anything you need it still missing.

If you’re curious you can also check out some blog posts written by people who worked on this relentlessly in the last weeks:

Thanks a lot everyone – I thoroughly enjoyed working with you on this and I’m looking forward to all the great things we are going to deliver together!

Bring your friends, bring your questions!

The Community team moved the weekly Ubuntu Community Q&A to be tomorrow, Friday 2016-04-22 15:00 UTC on https://ubuntuonair.com as usual. If you have questions, tune in and bring your friends as well!

Xubuntu: Xubuntu 16.04 released!

Planet Ubuntu - Thu, 04/21/2016 - 09:26

The Xubuntu team is pleased to announce the immediate release of Xubuntu 16.04. Xubuntu 16.04 is an LTS (Long-Term Support) release and will be supported for 3 years.

The final release images are available as Torrents and direct downloads from
http://xubuntu.org/getxubuntu/

As the main server will be very busy in the first few days after release, we recommend using the Torrents wherever possible.

Xubuntu 16.04 LTS Support

For support with the release, navigate to Help & Support for a complete list of methods to get help.

Highlights and Known Issues Highlights Known Issues
  • Thunar is the subject of a few bugs, though they all appear to revolve around similar issues. We have 2 patches applied that, while not completely fixing the issue, do lessen the impact.
  • When returning from lock, the cursor disappears on the desktop, you can bring the cursor back with Ctrl+Alt+F1 followed by Ctrl+Alt+F7
  • Mugshot crashes when capturing image with camera. Camera currently disabled.
  • Albatross, Bluebird and Orion GTK+ themes have been dropped since they do not support newer GTK3 versions

For more information on affecting bugs, bug fixes and a list of new package versions (since 14.04 LTS), please refer to the Release Notes.

Thanks to all who have contributed to Xubuntu, not least those who test for us when called upon, and generally anyone can do that for us all. We will name you all in time – you deserve one last mention. Thank you on behalf of all installing Xubuntu – you all rock!

Ubuntu App Developer Blog: The squirrel has landed!

Planet Ubuntu - Thu, 04/21/2016 - 09:07

Today, we are proud to bring you our 6th Long Term Support release: Ubuntu 16.04 LTS. It is the sum of the work of thousands of people collaborating all over the world, working tirelessly for the last six months and we'd like to share a few highlights.

Software distribution

You have probably already heard about this: we are bringing a new package format for you to start distributing your apps. It's called snap and it allows you to deliver software to users without going through the traditional Ubuntu archive inclusion process. Whether you are making a game, an utility or the next Firefox, it will enable you to continuously bring the latest version to users. And it’s easy! –it will mostly involve adding a single declarative file to your source tree.

Ubuntu Core and Snapcraft

Snappy Ubuntu Core is the future of Ubuntu, it is built around the snap packaging format and is a brand new world if you are used to classic Ubuntu. Transactional updates, confined apps, smaller and very modular, it’s the Ubuntu for all devices and form factors: your ARM board, your router, your drone, your laptop… your imagination is the limit.

Version 2.0 has just been released, and we’ve collected the highlights from the development team to get you started:

This is important for app developers in a multitude of ways. Snappy Ubuntu Core incorporates a lot of the feedback of third party app developers, ISVs and upstream projects we have been getting over the years. What all of them wanted in a nutshell was: a solid Ubuntu base, a lot of flexibility in handling their app and the relevant stack, being mostly independent from distro freezes, dead-simple packaging, bullet-proof upgrades and rollbacks, and an app store model established with the rise of the smartphones. Snappy Ubuntu Core is exactly that and more. What it also brings to Ubuntu is a clear isolation between apps and a universal trust model.

We have been working with the Engineering teams extensively and assisted them in testing the software, making sure that things worked, writing documentation, putting together examples and bootstrapping an initial community.

What we have today is just the start. There are still a number of details to be figured out, which will all land in Ubuntu through SRUs and Ubuntu Core updates.

Phone and Tablet

We have a tablet that converges into a desktop when a bluetooth mouse is detected! It ships some desktop apps by default such as Firefox and LibreOffice and of course, Ubuntu SDK apps. This is an exciting moment for everyone involved as it’s a milestone on the road to full devices convergence: many form factors and architectures, one codebase.

We have released the latest and greatest phone over-the-air update: OTA 10 a few days ago, which - as usual - brings new features and bug fixes, such as:

  • Re-designed Out Of the Box Experience

  • VPN support

  • Easy switching to desktop mode

  • New colour palette

  • New default apps: uNav, Dekko, Calendar

For more, see the release notes.

Here is what to look forward to in OTA 11 and of course, the Ubuntu SDK roadmap for the next 6 months: speed and more convergence.

Community phone ports

Our porting community of volunteers, lead by the indefatigable Marius Gripsgard has been extending the range of devices where Ubuntu can be installed.

Along with the OnePlus One port, a Fairphone 2 port, with great help and support from the Fairphone Engineering team, is on the way. The ubports site and the Porting Guide have all the information on status, how to get started and contribute to new or existing ports.

Developer portal

The Developer Portal is the place to get started with developing apps for Ubuntu, no matter if your primary interest is the phone, IoT devices or Ubuntu in general. Thus we have been supporting the various Engineering and product teams to bring together all app development resources and present them in a coherent and digestible way.

One important update was reflecting the changes in products and priorities. We wanted to make it clearer that the primary choice on the site is the one concerning products. An overview of the related changes (both implemented and planned) can be seen here.

A lot of work was put into importing already existing documentation. Both in terms of guides written by Engineering teams, but API docs as well. As usual in a diverse organisation as Ubuntu they come in various forms and we had to adapt to bring them onto the site without confusing our users. From now on it will be easier to import more API docs from more packages from various frameworks at the same time.

One of the great features of the developer site is that it will allow us to get the imported guides translated as well. This is useful for the docs imported from our Markdown importer, e.g. snappy and snapcraft. Here we almost exclusively rely on the great work of the Engineering teams and work in conjunction with them. The Marketing team has been contributing some more docs recently, which will land on the site very soon. On the snappy side of things, we also automatically import available gadget snaps from the store.

With the amount of information growing and growing, we are looking for ways to provide more clarity next cycle. We would like to make the versioning of documentation more obvious and improve the navigation. Luckily we are not alone in this quest, but are working on this together with the Design and Web teams. And lastly we are looking to landing a new blog engine soon, which is being tested on the Ubucon Site right now.

Community and planning

The next edition of the Ubuntu Online Summit is also coming in 2 weeks –3rd to 5th May. It is an excellent opportunity to meet other community members, plan together the next cycle and learn and provide feedback on the roadmaps of the Engineering teams. We hope to see you there.

We’d like to thank everyone who has helped put together yet again our best release so far: from documenters, to translators, to forum and Ask Ubuntu moderators, IRC operators, advocates, bug triagers, testers, app developers, packagers, artists and more…. here’s to you: happy Ubuntu 16.04!

Colin King: Ensure your stack is aligned correctly on aarch64 clone()

Planet Ubuntu - Thu, 04/21/2016 - 08:26
I got bitten this week with the clone() system call returning -EINVAL on aarch64 on code that worked fine on x86.  After re-reading the manual several times and looking at my code, I resorted to shoving in debug into the kernel to track down where the -EINVAL was occurring.

The answer to my issue is in arch/arm64/kernel/process.c, copy_thread():

if (stack_start) {
if (is_compat_thread(task_thread_info(p)))
childregs->compat_sp = stack_start;
/* 16-byte aligned stack mandatory on AArch64 */
else if (stack_start & 15)
return -EINVAL;
else
childregs->sp = stack_start;
}

Ahah! The stack being passed into clone() has to be 16 byte aligned.  With this simple fix to my code, clone() worked.   Pity this was not in the documentation.

Ubuntu Podcast from the UK LoCo: S09E08 – Up the Creek Extreme - Ubuntu Podcast

Planet Ubuntu - Thu, 04/21/2016 - 07:00

It’s Episode Eight of Season Nine of the Ubuntu Podcast! Alan Pope, Mark Johnson, Laura Cowen and Martin Wimpress are connected and speaking to your brain.

We’re still here!

In this week’s show:

  • We discuss unbreaking an Ubuntu computer (e.g., ahem, by formatting the /boot partition of a running laptop) using chroot.
  • We discuss accelerating lots of bits of the Raspberry Pi.

  • We share a Command Line Lurve – doctl

  • And we go over your feedback – thanks for sending it – please send more!

FixIT Leeds

FixIT Leeds is a non-profit social enterprise that finds cheap, innovative ways to get people on-line and share digital skills. They have a crowd funder to help them relocate.

Cat Detective and The Missing Money!

A short animated film using only Open Source software. Sent to the show and made by Dave Hingley.

  • This weeks cover image is taken from Wikimedia

That’s all for this week! If there’s a topic you’d like us to discuss, or you have any feedback on previous shows, please send your comments and suggestions to show@ubuntupodcast.org or Tweet us or Comment on our Facebook page or comment on our Google+ page or comment on our sub-Reddit.

Nathan Haines: Ubuntu 16.04 LTS FAQ

Planet Ubuntu - Thu, 04/21/2016 - 03:17

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

Ubuntu 16.04 LTS is here! Let's take a look at some of the most exciting features and common questions around this new operating system.

Ubuntu 16.04 LTS
  1. When does Ubuntu 16.04 LTS come out?

    • Ubuntu 16.04 LTS will reach general release on April 21st, 2016.
  2. I meant at what time will the release happen?

    • Ubuntu is actively being developed until the actual release happens, minus a small delay to help the mirrors propogate first. The release will be announced on the ubuntu-announce mailing list. (This page will not exist until the release.)
  3. What does "16.04 LTS" mean?

    • Ubuntu is released on a regular schedule every six months. The first release was in October 2004, and was named Ubuntu 4.10. For Ubuntu, the major version number is the year of release and the minor version number is the month of release. Ubuntu 16.04 is released on 2016-04-21, so the version number is 16.04.
    • Ubuntu releases are supported for 9 months, but many computing activities require stability. Every two years, an Ubuntu release is developed with long term support in mind. These releases, designated with "LTS" after the version number, are supported for 5 years on the server and desktop.
  4. What does "Xenial Xerus" mean?

    • Every version of Ubuntu has an alliterative development codename. After Ubuntu 6.06 LTS was released, the decision was made to choose new codenames in alphabetical order. Ubuntu 16.04 LTS is codenamed the Xenial Xerus release, or xenial for short.
    • "Xenial" is an adjective that means "friendly to others, especially foreigners, guests, or strangers." With lxd being perfect for "guest" containers, Snappy Ubuntu Core being perfect for IoT developers, snap packages being perfect for third-party software developers, and Ubuntu on Windows perfect for Windows developers who use Ubuntu in the cloud (or Ubuntu developers who are forced to use Windows at work!), xenial is a perfect description of Ubuntu 16.04!
    • "Xerus" is the genus name of the African ground squirrel. They collaborate and are not aggressive to other mammals, so they fit the description of xenial. It also makes for an adorable mascot!
  5. How long will Ubuntu 16.04 LTS be supported?

    • Ubuntu 16.04 LTS will be supported on desktops, servers, and in the cloud for 5 years, until April 2021. After this time, 16.04 LTS will enter end-of-life and no more security updates will be released.
Getting Ubuntu 16.04 LTS
  1. Where can I download Ubuntu 16.04 LTS?

    • Once released, Ubuntu 16.04 LTS will be available for release at http://www.ubuntu.com/download/. This URL will help you select the right architecture and will automatically link you to a mirror for the download. Please don't constantly refresh the direct download site!
  2. What if I find ubuntu-16.04-desktop-amd64.iso on an Ubuntu server before the official release is announced?

    • Then you've found a final release candidate that is being used to seed the mirrors before releases. Downloading or linking to it will interfere with the mirrors and delay the release.
  3. What if I post a link to it anyway?

    • If you do it on /r/Ubuntu, your post or comment will be removed and you will be banned for a day. The release team works hard enough as it is!
  4. What if I want to help others get Ubuntu 16.04 LTS faster?

    • Thank you for your help! Consider using BitTorrent (Ubuntu comes with Transmission) and seeding the final release.
  5. What if I'm already running Ubuntu 14.04.4 LTS or Ubuntu 15.10?

    • Then you can simply upgrade to Ubuntu 16.04 using Software Updater
Upgrading to Ubuntu 16.04 LTS
  1. Is upgrading to a new version of Ubuntu easy?

    • Yes, the upgrade process is supported and automated. However, you should always back up your files and data before upgrading Ubuntu. Actually, you should always keep recent backups even when you not upgrading Ubuntu.
    • Ubuntu checks for software updates once a day, and Software Updater will inform you once a new version of Ubuntu is available. The upgrade will download a large amount of data--anywhere from 0.5 - 1.5 GB of data depending on the packages you have installed, and the upgrade process can take some time. Don't do any serious work on your computer during the upgrade process. Light web browsing or a simple game such as Aisleriot, Mahjongg, or Mines is safe.
  2. Should I upgrade to Ubuntu 16.04 LTS right away or wait?

    • It should be safe to upgrade immediately, and as long as you back up your home folder and have install media for your current version of Ubuntu in case you want to reinstall, there's very little risk involved.
  3. Is it better to wait until later?

    • Probably not, but there are other benefits. Ubuntu 16.04 will receive newer release images with bug fixes about 3 months after its initial release. In addition, downloading updates can be much faster after release week. (Be sure to set up your Ubuntu mirror in Software & Updates!) Ubuntu 14.04 LTS is supported until April 2019 and Ubuntu 15.10 is supported until July 2016, so you have nothing to lose by waiting a couple weeks.
  4. I'm running Ubuntu 15.10. How do I upgrade to Ubuntu 16.04 LTS?

    • After Ubuntu 16.04 LTS is released, Software Updater will inform you that a new version of Ubuntu is available. Make sure that all available updates for Ubuntu 15.10 have been installed first, then click the "Upgrade..." button.
  5. I'm running Ubuntu 14.04.4 LTS. How do I upgrade to Ubuntu 16.04 LTS?

    • After Ubuntu 16.04.1 LTS is released in July 2016, Software Updater will inform you that a new version of Ubuntu is available. Make sure that all available updates for Ubuntu 14.04 LTS have been installed first, then click the "Upgrade..." button.
  6. I'm running Ubuntu 12.04 LTS. How do I upgrade to Ubuntu 16.04 LTS?

    • You can't upgrade directly to Ubuntu 16.04 LTS, so you have two options:
      • Use Update Manager to upgrade to Ubuntu 14.04 LTS, then reboot and use Software Updater to upgrade again to Ubuntu 16.04 LTS.
      • Back up your computer and install Ubuntu 16.04 LTS from scratch.
  7. What is Ubuntu 16.04.1 and why can't I update Ubuntu 14.04 LTS immediately?

    • A new version of Ubuntu is released every six months, but LTS releases are used for years. So Ubuntu offers "point releases" of LTS versions. Starting 3 months after the release and then every 6 months thereafter, new install images are created that include the latest updates to all of the default software. This allows new installations to run the latest software immediately and decreases the time it takes to download updates after a new install.
    • Because LTS users depend on stability, Ubuntu 14.04 LTS will not automatically offer an update to Ubuntu 16.04 LTS until the first point release. After three months, any show-stopper bugs should be solved and the upgrade process will have been tested by many others and improved if necessary.
  8. What if I want to upgrade right now?

    • Upgrading from Ubuntu 14.04 LTS to Ubuntu 16.04 LTS should be safe and easy. If you have a recent backup of your files and data, simply open Terminal and type update-manager -d. This will tell Ubuntu to upgrade to the next release early.
  9. What if I already ran update-manager -d and upgraded to a beta or pre-release version of Ubuntu 16.04 LTS?

    • If you run Software Updater after the release of Ubuntu 16.04 LTS, your version of xenial will be the same as the released version of Ubuntu.
  10. What if I don't believe that?

    • When xenial is being developed, it is constantly being improved. Milestones such as Alpha 1, Beta 2, and so on are simply points in time where developers can check progress. If you install Ubuntu from a Beta 2 image (for example), the moment you apply updates, you are no longer running Beta 2. Updates to xenial continue until release, when the Ubuntu archive is locked, images are spun, and the xenial archive is finalized and released as Ubuntu 16.04 LTS. After the release of Ubuntu 16.04 LTS, all further updates come from the xenial-updates and xenial-security repositories and the xenial repository remains unchanged. Updating from the Ubuntu repositories during and after the xenial development and release brings you along through theses moments in time.
      • TRIVIA: As implied above, this means that Ubuntu 16.04 LTS doesn't exist until the Release Team names the final product. Until then, the release is simply Xenial Xerus or xenial for short.
Coming next:

Details on new features!

  • How do snap packages and deb packages work together?
  • DAE Unity 8?
  • Y U NO AMD fglrx drivers?
  • And other questions you ask in the [/r/Ubuntu comments](https://redd.it/4frg4a)!

Canonical Design Team: Redesigning ubuntu.com’s navigation

Planet Ubuntu - Thu, 04/21/2016 - 01:40

Last month, the web team had an offsite (outside of the office) week sprint in Holborn, central London. We don’t all work on exactly the same projects in our day-to-day, so it’s nice to have this type of sprint, where everyone can work together and show each other what we’ve been working on over the last few months.

 

The web team in our offsite in Holborn

 

One of the key items in the agenda for the week was to brainstorm possible solutions for the key areas we want to improve in our navigation.

The last time we did a major redesign of ubuntu.com’s navigation was back in 2013 — time flies! So we thought now would be a good time to explore ways to improve how users navigate Ubuntu’s main website and how they discover other sites in the Ubuntu ecosystem.

Collaborative sketching

On the second day of the sprint, Francesca walked us through the current version of the navigation and explained the four key issues we want to solve. For each of the issues, she also showed how other sites solve similar problems.

While the 2013 navigation redesign solved some of the problems we were facing at the time (poor exposure of our breadth of products was a big issue, for instance) other issues have emerged since then that we’ve been meaning to address for a while.

After Francesca’s intro, we broke into four groups, and each group sketched a solution for each of the issues, which was then presented to everyone so we could discuss.

 

Discussing the team’s sketches

 

By having everyone in the team, from UX and visual designers, to developers and project managers, contribute ideas and sketch together, we were able to generate lots of ideas in a very short amount of time. We could move the project forward much more quickly than if one UX or one designer had to come up with ideas by themselves over days or weeks.

Improving the global navigation

 

ubuntu.com’s global navigation bar

 

The main things to improve on the global navigation were:

  • Some users don’t see the light grey bar above the main orange navigation
  • Some users think the links in the global nav are part of the ubuntu.com site
  • Important sites sit under the “More” link and do not have enough visibility
  • On the new full width sections, the global nav, main nav and “breadcrumb” form a visual sandwich effect that could create confusion

It was interesting to see the different groups come up similar ideas on how to improve the usability of the global navigation. Some of the suggestions were more simple and others more involved.

The main suggestions for improvement that we discussed were:

  • Rename the “More” link as “More sites” to make it more clear
  • Increase the number of links shown by default by using the full width of the page
  • Explore using different colours for the background, such as a dark grey
  • Explore having a drawer that exposes all Ubuntu sites, instead of the links being on display all the time (like the Bloomberg website)

 

 

On Bloomberg.com when you click the “Bloomberg the Company & Its Products” link at the top (above) you open a large drawer that exposes the Bloomberg universe of sites.

 

Improving the main navigation

 

ubuntu.com’s main navigation with a dropdown that lists second level links

 

The main ubuntu.com nav is possibly the most crucial part of the navigation that we would like to improve. The key improvements we’d like to work on are:

  • Having the ability to highlight key sections or featured content
  • Rely less on the site’s IA to structure the navigation as it makes it hard to cross-link between different sections (some pages are relevant to more than one section)
  • Improve the visibility of content that lives in the third level (it is currently only accessible via the breadcrumb-style navigation)

Even though the proposed solutions were different from each other, there were some patterns that popped up more than once amongst the different groups:

  • Featured content within the navigation (eg. the original Boston Globe responsive redesign, and Amazon.co.uk)
  • Links that live in more than one place (eg. John Lewis, Marks & Spencer and other retailers)
  • The idea of using the mega menu pattern

 

In the first version of the Boston Globe’s redesigned website, the main navigation included simple featured content for each of the sections

 

On the John Lewis website, you can get to nursery furniture from “Home & Garden > Room” and “Baby & Child > Baby & Nursery”

 

The main navigation on Amazon.co.uk includes featured ads

 

Solving the third level links issues

 

ubuntu.com’s breadcrumb-style navigation showing third level links

 

The main issues with the current third level links are:

  • We are using a recognisable design pattern (the breadcrumb) in a not so typical way (as second and third level navigation)
  • When you click on a third level link, you lose the visibility of the second level links, making it harder to understand where you are in the site
  • The pattern isn’t flexible: some of our labels are long, and only a small number of links fit horizontally, even on a large screen

One thing that we are almost certain of is that we will not be able to remove third level links completely from our site, so we need to improve the way we show them.

The most interesting suggestions on how to handle this issue were:

  • Include a table of contents for the section at the top of pages (like GOV.uk)
  • Key third level links could be highlighted in the main navigation menu

 

On GOV.uk, sections which have sub-sections include an overview of all the sub-sections at the top of every page. This makes it easier to understand the type and breadth of content of that section

 

Improving the footer

 

ubuntu.com’s “fat footer” with three levels of links

 

Ubuntu.com’s footer is certainly the simplest of the problems we want to solve in terms of navigation. But, nonetheless, there are some issues with the current solution:

  • There are too many levels of links in the footer
  • The download section is hidden in the second footer level, despite being one of the main top level links

The most popular idea that came out of the sketching session was to use the space available better, so that sections can be listed in a masonry type grid, rather than one per column like they currently are.

This means we’d need fewer columns to list all important content and expose the IA of the site. It also means we can ditch the middle level of the current footer design (which now holds the About, Support and Download sections).

Next steps

The next step in the navigation redesign project is to build prototypes to test some of the ideas we had in our workshop, and refine the visual direction. We want to see if the assumptions we’ve made are true, and if the patterns are easy and intuitive to use across different screen sizes and devices.

We will then do some user testing and iterate based on the feedback we get.

We might also have to do some IA work alongside the redesign of the main navigation, if we do want to have links that are listed in different sections and if we want to present more curated links based on user tasks in each of the sections.

Stay tuned!

Alessio Treglia: Corporate Culture in the Transformative Enterprise

Planet Ubuntu - Thu, 04/21/2016 - 01:40

 

The “accelerated” world of the Western or “Westernized” countries seems to be fed by an insidious food, which generates a kind of psychological dependence: anxiety. The economy of global markets cannot help it, it has a structural need of it to feed their iron logic of survival. The anxiety generated in the masses of consumers and in market competitors is crucial for Companies fighting each other and now they can only live if men are projected to objective targets continuously moving forward, without ever allowing them to achieve a stable destination.

The consumer is thus constantly maintained in a state of perpetual breathlessness, always looking for the fresh air of liberation that could eventually reduce his tension. It is a state of anxiety caused by false needs generated by advertising campaigns whose primary purpose is to create a need, to interpret to their advantage a still confused psychological demand leading to the destination decided by the market…

<Read More…[by Fabio Marzocca]>

Sean Davis: Translation Updates!

Planet Ubuntu - Wed, 04/20/2016 - 16:50
Some releases are notable only for their improved translations.  LightDM GTK+ Greeter Settings 1.2.1, MenuLibre 2.1.3, and Xfce Panel Switch 1.0.4 are such releases. Translation Updates LightDM GTK+ Greeter Settings Arabic, Brazilian Portuguese, Catalan, Chinese (Simplified), Croatian, Dutch, Finnish, French, German, Greek, Japanese, Lithuanian, Polish, Portuguese, Russian, Serbian, Spanish MenuLibre Brazilian Portuguese, Chinese (Simplified), Croatian, Czech, […]

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