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Ubuntu Membership Board call for nominations

The Fridge - Tue, 02/17/2015 - 03:35

As you may know, Ubuntu Membership is a recognition of significant and sustained contribution to Ubuntu and the Ubuntu community. To this end, the Community Council recruits members of our current membership community for the valuable role of reviewing and evaluating the contributions of potential members to bring them on board or assist with having them achieve this goal.

We have seven members of our boards expiring from their 2 year terms within the next couple months, which means we need to do some restaffing of this Membership Board.

We’re looking for Ubuntu Members who can participate either in the 12:00 UTC meetings or 22:00 UTC (if you can make both, even better).

Both the 12:00 UTC and the 22:00 UTC meetings happen once a month, specific day may be discussed by the board upon addition of new members.

We have the following requirements for nominees:

  • be an Ubuntu member (preferably for some time)
  • be confident that you can evaluate contributions to various parts of our community
  • be committed to attending the membership meetings
  • broad insight into the Ubuntu community at large is a plus

Additionally, those sitting on membership boards are current Ubuntu Members with a proven track record of activity in the community. They have shown themselves over time to be able to work well with others and display the positive aspects of the Ubuntu Code of Conduct. They should be people who can discern character and evaluate contribution quality without emotion while engaging in an interview/discussion that communicates interest, a welcoming atmosphere, and which is marked by humanity, gentleness, and kindness. Even when they must deny applications, they should do so in such a way that applicants walk away with a sense of hopefulness and a desire to return with a more complete application rather than feeling discouraged or hurt.

To nominate yourself or somebody else (please confirm they wish to accept the nomination and state you have done so), please send a mail to the membership boards mailing list (ubuntu-membership-boards at lists.ubuntu.com). You will want to include some information about the nominee, a launchpad profile link and which time slot (12:00 or 22:00) the nominee will be able to participate in.

We will be accepting nominations through Monday March 9th at 12:00 UTC. At that time all nominations will be forwarded to the Community Council who will make the final decision and announcement.

Thanks in advance to you and to the dedication everybody has put into their roles as board members.

Originally posted to the ubuntu-community-team mailing list on Tue Feb 17 10:29:01 UTC 2015 by Elizabeth K. Joseph, on behalf of the Ubuntu Community Council

The Fridge: Interview with Laura Czajkowski of the Ubuntu Community Council

Planet Ubuntu - Tue, 02/17/2015 - 02:52

The Ubuntu Community Council is the primary community (i.e., non-technical) governance body for the Ubuntu project. In this series of 7 interviews, we go behind the scenes with the community members who were elected in 2013 serve on this council with Mark Shuttleworth.

In this, our third interview, we talk with Laura Czajkowski about her work from the Ubuntu LoCo in Ireland to her current role at Couchbase.

Tell us a little about yourself

A little about me, I hail from Castleconnell, Co. Limerick Ireland and moved to England 4 years ago and now live in Guildford with my 6 hens and a pug called Bash. I am passionate about open source and communities and will happily talk about these subjects over a beverage or two for hours! By day I’m the Developer Community Manager at Couchbase, where I work with the developer advocate team talking about Couchbase Mobile and Server.

What was your first computing experience?

I was given an Amiga 500 as a kid and played games for a chunk of time till I went to secondary school/high School and did Computer Programming in Basic for a year.

How long have you been involved with Ubuntu?

I got involved in Ubuntu around ‘06/07 sometime

What are some of the projects you’ve worked on in Ubuntu over the years?

I started off being involved in my loco and on IRC and from there just jumped straight in and onto various projects. Ubuntu Ireland Ubuntu UK,Membership board, LoCo Council Ubuntu Leadership (development of leadership), Ubuntu Bug Control, Ubuntu Bugsquad, Ubuntu Accomplishments, NGO project and Ubuntu Women

There is so much choice out there hopefully you can find something that excites you to get involved.

What is your focus in Ubuntu today?

I’m on the Community Council, helping and supporting people where I can. I’m logged on permanently on IRC in various locations czajkowski on freenode if you ever want to talk or bounce ideas about Ubuntu and the community and I’m involved in the loco communities.

Do you contribute to other free/open source projects? Which ones?

Couchbase

If you were to give a newcomer some advice about getting involved with Ubuntu, what would it be?

We’re a welcoming community, and open to people who have varying experience levels and expertise. Try different things out and find out what works best for you. In Ubuntu there are many ways to contribute to be involved and have fun. Some of my closest friends are those I met from being involved in Ubuntu.

Always have fun. Always ask for help, and know it’s ok to ask for help. Always know it’s ok to take a break and come back. Always welcome!

Do you have any other comments else you wish to share with the community?

Nothing is perfect and everything can always be worked and improved upon. Ubuntu is no different, it’s not perfect but you do have a voice and a community you can talk to on IRC, Forums, Mailing Lists.

Have fun using Ubuntu and share your experience with others where ever you can.

New to this series? Check out our previous two Community Council interviews:

Kubuntu Wire: Netrunner 15 ‘Prometheus’ is here — the best KDE-based Linux distro gets better

Planet Ubuntu - Tue, 02/17/2015 - 02:45

Beta News reviews Kubuntu derivative Netrunner.  This release of Netrunner comes the Kubuntu packages for Plasma 5 making this a sort of preview for Kubuntu 15.04 and the review continues the trend of good words for the new KDE desktop.  Netrunner likes to make plenty of customisations compared to Kubuntu’s very default KDE setup and the reviewer is impressed.

I urge you to give this a go. You will be shocked at the beauty and polish; clearly the the Netrunner team cares about its releases

 

Interview with Laura Czajkowski of the Ubuntu Community Council

The Fridge - Tue, 02/17/2015 - 02:35

The Ubuntu Community Council is the primary community (i.e., non-technical) governance body for the Ubuntu project. In this series of 7 interviews, we go behind the scenes with the community members who were elected in 2013 serve on this council with Mark Shuttleworth.

In this, our third interview, we talk with Laura Czajkowski about her work from the Ubuntu LoCo in Ireland to her current role at Couchbase.

Tell us a little about yourself

A little about me, I hail from Castleconnell, Co. Limerick Ireland and moved to England 4 years ago and now live in Guildford with my 6 hens and a pug called Bash. I am passionate about open source and communities and will happily talk about these subjects over a beverage or two for hours! By day I’m the Developer Community Manager at Couchbase, where I work with the developer advocate team talking about Couchbase Mobile and Server.

What was your first computing experience?

I was given an Amiga 500 as a kid and played games for a chunk of time till I went to secondary school/high School and did Computer Programming in Basic for a year.

How long have you been involved with Ubuntu?

I got involved in Ubuntu around ‘06/07 sometime

What are some of the projects you’ve worked on in Ubuntu over the years?

I started off being involved in my loco and on IRC and from there just jumped straight in and onto various projects. Ubuntu Ireland Ubuntu UK,Membership board, LoCo Council Ubuntu Leadership (development of leadership), Ubuntu Bug Control, Ubuntu Bugsquad, Ubuntu Accomplishments, NGO project and Ubuntu Women

There is so much choice out there hopefully you can find something that excites you to get involved.

What is your focus in Ubuntu today?

I’m on the Community Council, helping and supporting people where I can. I’m logged on permanently on IRC in various locations czajkowski on freenode if you ever want to talk or bounce ideas about Ubuntu and the community and I’m involved in the loco communities.

Do you contribute to other free/open source projects? Which ones?

Couchbase

If you were to give a newcomer some advice about getting involved with Ubuntu, what would it be?

We’re a welcoming community, and open to people who have varying experience levels and expertise. Try different things out and find out what works best for you. In Ubuntu there are many ways to contribute to be involved and have fun. Some of my closest friends are those I met from being involved in Ubuntu.

Always have fun. Always ask for help, and know it’s ok to ask for help. Always know it’s ok to take a break and come back. Always welcome!

Do you have any other comments else you wish to share with the community?

Nothing is perfect and everything can always be worked and improved upon. Ubuntu is no different, it’s not perfect but you do have a voice and a community you can talk to on IRC, Forums, Mailing Lists.

Have fun using Ubuntu and share your experience with others where ever you can.

New to this series? Check out our previous two Community Council interviews:

The Fridge: Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 404

Planet Ubuntu - Mon, 02/16/2015 - 20:38

Matthew Helmke: Discontinue Presidents’ Day and replace it with a paid holiday for Election Day

Planet Ubuntu - Mon, 02/16/2015 - 16:44

Here in the United States, Presidents’ Day was created by combining Lincoln’s Birthday and Washington’s Birthday. However, it is vague, and frankly, not every president has accomplishments that are worthy of celebration.

Many people in the USA work and find it hard to get to the polls on Election Day. The Federal Government should set an example by creating a paid holiday to encourage and make it easier for everyone to vote.

Eliminating the first holiday and replacing it with the second enables this action to have no fiscal consequences.

Anyway, that is my idea. If you are in the USA and want to support the idea, I created a White House petition at http://wh.gov/ibwg0. If you are an American citizen and you think this is a worthwhile idea, please sign and share.

Fabián Rodríguez: On se voit ce soir au (3L)-Logiciel libre en liberté groupe pour débutant, rencontre de Février

Planet Ubuntu - Mon, 02/16/2015 - 15:09

Pour plus de détails, consultez l’Agenda du Libre.

On y présentera un atelier: Les applications de base dans le monde du libre, (ex: suite bureautique, navigateur etc…), La gestion d’une distribution Gnu/Linux, sécurité et mots de passe et autres. Il y aura aussi en seconde partie, des échanges et discussions et résolutions de problèmes (entraide direct ) si il y lieu.

 

Costales: An unexpected feature, the Ubuntu Phone is the hacking machine! Releasing the beast!

Planet Ubuntu - Mon, 02/16/2015 - 11:42
I didn't read posts about one of the most amazing feature in Ubuntu Phone...

sudo apt-get install apache2?   > : )The limit is our imagination!


Shane Fagan: Getting over the tipping point with gaming

Planet Ubuntu - Mon, 02/16/2015 - 08:17

I haven't blogged in a long long time about Ubuntu but I'm still around and I'm seriously happy about where gaming specifically has come on the platform. We currently have more games on the platform than the Xbox One and the PS4 but still people complain about their games not being supported. The thing that I see though right now is a tipping point (yes I mean the gameshow). The issue currently is 2 fold, we have great things on the horizon, we have Mantle and glNext and we have new replacements for X11 all of which are great but the simple fact is there are games out there that aren't there and are keeping people off Linux as a platform. Here is the list of them and notice its very very short:

1. All Blizzard games but Heroes of the Storm. SC2 and WoW are and always have been 2 of the most played games with WINE. WoW runs fine but SC2 has issues nowadays. Then Diablo3 is less important and Hearthstone well that should be ported anyway because they use Unity for their engine which supports Linux OOTB and their Battlenet client supports Linux with the fact that its completely portable because it runs Qt and all the rest are in house Blizzard bits which are also easily portable.
2. League of Legends, I don't play the game but its hugely popular and isn't very well supported with WINE either.

Yep that is the list of games that are the most commonly talked about as blockers for switching and they are also commonly requested ports from Linux users too. For instance me, I have spent 400 ish on Blizzard games over the past 15 years. I'm about as dedicated a fan of their games as anyone. But they don't support Linux which actually makes me hugely conflicted and I'm sure a lot of people would say stop giving them money and for the most part I have stopped because of it.

So onto the solution which I am suggesting. And this is an idea I threw around for actually a few years but its something only Canonical or RedHat could actually do. It will cost some money. What are the problems for a major developer porting to Linux? Well the main problem is they would be supporting a product without many users with an expectation of great quality and the second problem is profit. Why would anyone risk their money when they aren't completely guaranteed profit? These are multi-billion dollar corporations, they don't get there by charity.

The solution to that is take at least loss away from the equation. If Canonical or RedHat not to leave anyone out could pay for the development cost of the port to Linux as a loan which Blizzard or Riot would pay back when Linux users spend money on their games. This completely takes out the loss from the table and means they would at least be breaking even on the port, then after the loan is paid back they keep the profit. Linux gamers get their game, some people will come over then from Windows who were at the tipping point and there would be 1 less reason for people to have a Windows dual boot in the first place.

The idea itself is a completely speculative effort but I can't see why Blizzard or Riot wouldn't take them up on the offer. Its potentially a free revenue stream for them and all it takes is just putting a few developers on the port. The benefit for Canonical or RedHat (it would benefit both really) is 1 just instant potential users, 2 marketing because it would definitely make headlines around the internet and 3 most importantly it will make a lot of users very very happy. Mark invests so much money to grow Canonical and keep growing Linux, this idea would do the same. The amazing thing is we already have the other games which people play a lot which are CSGO, TF2, Dota2.

The trick is even if it loses money specifically so lets say it costs 500k to port a game like that and they pay back 200k of that, its still worth it, why? Because its taking down a barrier to entry which means you would be gaining some unknown number of users at some point. Its a very weird way to look at the problem but its the correct approach.

Tags: 

Victor Tuson Palau: Make a scope for your YouTube channel in 5 minutes

Planet Ubuntu - Mon, 02/16/2015 - 07:00

Not long back Chris Wayne published a post about a scope creator tool.  Last week, I was visiting bq and we decided with Victor Gonzalez  that we should have a scope for Canal bq. The folks at bq do an excellent job at creating “how to” and “first steps” videos, and they have started publishing some for the bq Aquaris E4.5 Ubuntu Edition.

Here is a few screenshots of the scope that is now available to download from the store:

The impressive thing is that it took us about 5 min to get a working version of the scope.  Here is what needed to do:

  • First, we followed Chris’ instructions to install the scope creator tool.
  • Once we had it set up on my laptop, we run:
    scopecreator create youtube com.ubuntu.developer.victorbq.canalbq canalbq
  • Next, we configured the scope. The configuration is done in a json file called manifest.json. This file describes the content of what you will publish later to the store. You need to care about: “title”, “description”, “version” and “mantainer”. The rest are values populated by the tool:
    scopecreator edit config
    {
    "name": "com.ubuntu.developer.victorbq.canalbq",
    "description": "Canal bq",
    "framework": "ubuntu-sdk-14.10",
    "architecture": "armhf",
    "title": "Canal bq",
    "hooks": {
    "canalbq": {
    "scope": "canalbq",
    "apparmor": "scope-security.json"
    }
    },
    "version": "0.3",
    "maintainer": "Victor Gonzalez <anemailfromvictor@bq.com>"
    }
  • The following step was to set up the branding: Easy! Branding is define on an .ini file. “Display name” will be the name listed on the “manage” window once installed, and also will be the title of your scope if you don’t use a “PageHeader.Logo”. the [Appearance] section describes the colours and logos to use when banding a scope.
    scopecreator edit branding
    [ScopeConfig]
    DisplayName=Canal bq
    Description=Youtube custommized channel
    Author=Canonical Ltd.
    Art=images/logo.png
    Icon=images/logo.png
    SearchHint=Buscar
    LocationDataNeeded=true
    [Appearance]
    PageHeader.Background=color:///#000000
    PageHeader.ForegroundColor=#FFFFFF
    PreviewButtonColor=#FFFFFF
    PageHeader.Logo=./images/logo.png
  • The final part is to define the departments (drop down menu) for the scope. This is also a json file and it is unique the youtube scope template. You can either use “playlists” or “channels” (or both) as departments. The id PLjQOV_HHlukyNGBFaSVGFVWrbj3vjtMjd corresponds to a play list from youtube, with url= https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLjQOV_HHlukyNGBFaSVGFVWrbj3vjtMjd
    scopecreator edit channels{
    “maxResults”: “20”,
    “playlists”: [
    {
    “id”: “PLjQOV_HHlukyNGBFaSVGFVWrbj3vjtMjd”,
    “reminder”:”Aquaris E4,5 Ubuntu Edition”
    },
    {
    “id”: “PLjQOV_HHlukzBhuG97XVYsw96F-pd9P2I”,
    “reminder”: “Tecnópolis”
    },
    {
    “id”: “PLC46C98114CA9991F”,
    “reminder”: “aula bq”
    },
    {
    “id”: “PLE7ACC7492AD7D844″,
    “reminder”: “primeros pasos”
    },
    {
    “id”: “PL551D151492F07D63″,
    “reminder”: “accesorios”
    },
    {
    “id”: “PLjQOV_HHlukyIT8Jr3aI1jtoblUTD4mn0″,
    “reminder”: “3d”
    }
    ]
    }

After this, the only thing left to do is replace the placeholder icon, with the bq logo:
~/canalbq/canalbq/images/logo.png
And build, check and publish the scope:
scopecreator build

This last command generates the click file that you need to upload to the store. If you have a device (for example a Nexus4 or an emulator ), it can also install it so you can test it.

It is super simple to create a scope for a youtube channel! so what are you going to create next?


Riccardo Padovani: Ubuntu Phone: The hardware

Planet Ubuntu - Sun, 02/15/2015 - 13:02

Hey all,
finally I have time to do a review for the first Ubuntu Phone - the BQ Aquarius E4.5 Ubuntu Edition. I joined the Insider Launch Event (thanks to Canonical for the invite), on Friday 6th Feb, so today is more than one week I use it as main phone, and it’s time to do a first review. The system itself wasn’t a surprise for me, I use Ubuntu as main phone (on a Nexus 4) since last September.

In this first article I write my personal impressions on the phone itself, but there are a lot of reviews on the web, so I don’t want to bore you: I’ll keep my impressions short. At the end of the article I write my personal opinion on the project, and what this phone means for the free software world.

The phone

The good

I’m quite happy with the phone itself. Performances are better than on Nexus 4, sizes are right for me, and I don’t go out crazy for super hardware, so it totally fits my wishes. The last phone I used before Ubuntu was a Samsung Galaxy S4 - definitely, a better hardware. But Ubuntu is so good I don’t miss Android performances. So, it’s ok for me.

The bad

There are two things I wish will be improved in next Ubuntu Phones:

  • Borders: I love Ubuntu hasn’t soft touch buttons. So why we have borders? And not only borders, we have huge borders. Look to the photo above: the phone size it’s the same of a S4, but the screen is smaller - so borders are bigger. This hasn’t any sense, I want a phone (almost) borderless
  • Branding: nowhere on the phone there is a Ubuntu logo or something like this. Seriously? Luckly I have some stickers at home, but I think a little Ubuntu logo should be in the back of the phone
They hate us ‘cause they ain’t us

As I said the review on the hardware itself was fast - there are a lot of articles on the web written by people more competent (and with better English) than me. No worries, I’ll also a blogpost about the software and one (or more) about scopes, the real revolution of Ubuntu at the moment.

Anyway, I want to share with you a thought that came wandering on the web.

A lot of people on blogs and social network wrote negative comments about the phone, without even trying it. This is ok, people love to talk. We have two main types of feedbacks: constructive and destructive. Constructive are a good thing! Take and report them where they could be read by developers, or designer, or whatever. Without having criticism you give yourself at leisure. So when you read a serious criticism say thanks to who said it, and try to have that aspect of the phone improved.

Then there are destructive criticism, because is Canonical which makes the phone, ‘cause Mir, ‘cause CLA, ‘cause Deb and not RPM. Just ignore them. There is no point replying to such comments. Writing a reply to a troll requires time and commitment. Writing a troll comment requires 5 seconds. It’s a losing battle.

Just remember what we’re doing, and why. We’re trying to change the world. Yes, we’re only at the beginning of the journey. Yes, convergence isn’t still there. Yes, the phone isn’t a top gamma. Yes, we don’t have all sparkling applications Android or iOs have. But we’re building an open-source (eco)system, with some innovative features, we’re building something that could be a game changer in the IT world.

Will we able to change world? I don’t know. Maybe we will not. Maybe will be someone else. But doesn’t matter. Because we are the ones who dream of changing the world, and we enjoy when someone succeeds. Because yes, sometimes someone stand it.

Ciao,
R.

Do you like this article? Please consider to buy me an English course, so I can improve it or just send me a feedback at riccardo@rpadovani.com.

Andrea Corbellini: Prime numbers and universe factories

Planet Ubuntu - Sun, 02/15/2015 - 09:54

I’m a XKCD fan, and I look it up regularly. There’s a comic that I particularly enjoyed: Pi Equals.

Well, it appears that Randall was right in that there’s a help message hidden somewhere. And I just found it in a prime number:

245178888024581899558766786108789912235672909204719666025638877624752119760547413887830514281649480308707369249

That number corresponds to the ASCII encoding of this message:

help!! i'm trapped in a universe factory!!!!!!

Apparently, universe factory workers speak English and write ASCII. Nice coincidence, huh?

The discovery

Yesterday I was playing with the two illegal primes listed on Wikipedia. I was already aware of them, but I had never decoded them till yesterday. While doing so I wondered: how many prime numbers can be directly mapped to an executable file? Also, how many prime numbers can be directly mapped to plain English texts? Perhaps, while digging prime numbers, could we find something like the Iliad or a fully working operating system?

Well, while asking myself those highly philosophical questions, Randall’s comic quickly came to my mind, and I decided to start looking for help requests hidden in primes. You can’t imagine how many of them I found!

At first I tried looking for all prime numbers corresponding to strings starting with HELP! I'M TRAPPED IN A UNIVERSE FACTORY!, with an arbitrary suffix. I found many of them, but I wasn’t satisfied with the result: I wanted something that was purely English/ASCII, without any garbage. Therefore I tried appending hashtags like #help or #universe, but could not find any interesting combination that was also a prime number (apparently, use of Twitter is forbidden inside universe factories).

So I decided to change approach: I looked for all primes corresponding to HELP, followed by a variable number of exclamation marks, followed by I'M TRAPPED IN A UNIVERSE FACTORY, followed by other exclamation marks. I could not find anything.

But then I tried with a lower case string, and… I found lots of such primes!

help i'm trapped in a universe factory!!!!!!! help! i'm trapped in a universe factory!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! help!! i'm trapped in a universe factory!!!!!! help!!! i'm trapped in a universe factory!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! help!!!!!! i'm trapped in a universe factory!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! help!!!!!!!!! i'm trapped in a universe factory!!!! help!!!!!!!!!! i'm trapped in a universe factory!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! help!!!!!!!!!!!!! i'm trapped in a universe factory! help!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! i'm trapped in a universe factory!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! help!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! i'm trapped in a universe factory!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! help!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! i'm trapped in a universe factory!!!!!!!!!! help!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! i'm trapped in a universe factory!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! help!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! i'm trapped in a universe factory!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! help!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! i'm trapped in a universe factory!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! help!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! i'm trapped in a universe factory!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! help!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! i'm trapped in a universe factory!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! help!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! i'm trapped in a universe factory!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! help!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! i'm trapped in a universe factory!!!!!!! ...

I picked the one I liked most and verified its primality with Wolfram|Alpha and numberempire.com.

I’m not 100% sure that all the others are primes, as I used Fermat primality test. However I’m impressed by what I found. Now I can’t stop wondering how much literature, physics or technology could be hidden in prime numbers, in plain English and UTF-8 encoded. :D

(Obviously, I’m perfectly conscious on what’s happening here, but I though this was a nice fact to share. It could also be a nice number to print on a shirt.)

Dear universe factory worker, I’m going to rescue you, sooner or later. Just tell me how.

Andrea Corbellini: Prime numbers and universe factories

Planet Ubuntu - Sun, 02/15/2015 - 09:31

I’m a XKCD fan, and I look it up regularly. There’s a comic that I particularly enjoyed: Pi Equals.

Well, it appears that Randall was right in that there’s a help message hidden somewhere. And I just found it in a prime number:

245178888024581899558766786108789912235672909204719666025638877624752119760547413887830514281649480308707369249

That number corresponds to the ASCII encoding of this message:

help!! i'm trapped in a universe factory!!!!!!

Apparently, universe factory workers speak English and write ASCII. Nice coincidence, huh?

The discovery

Yesterday I was playing with the two illegal primes listed on Wikipedia. I was already aware of them, but I had never decoded them till yesterday. While doing so I wondered: how many prime numbers can be directly mapped to an executable file? Also, how many prime numbers can be directly mapped to plain English texts? Perhaps, while digging prime numbers, could we find something like the Iliad or a fully working operating system?

Well, while asking myself those highly philosophical questions, Randall’s comic quickly came to my mind, and I decided to start looking for help requests hidden in primes. You can’t imagine how many of them I found!

At first I tried looking for all prime numbers corresponding to strings starting with HELP! I'M TRAPPED IN A UNIVERSE FACTORY!, with an arbitrary suffix. I found many of them, but I wasn’t satisfied with the result: I wanted something that was purely English/ASCII, without any garbage. Therefore I tried appending hashtags like #help or #universe, but could not find any interesting combination that was also a prime number (apparently, use of Twitter is forbidden inside universe factories).

So I decided to change approach: I looked for all primes corresponding to HELP, followed by a variable number of exclamation marks, followed by I'M TRAPPED IN A UNIVERSE FACTORY, followed by other exclamation marks. I could not find anything.

But then I tried with a lower case string, and… I found lots of such primes!

help i'm trapped in a universe factory!!!!!!! help! i'm trapped in a universe factory!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! help!! i'm trapped in a universe factory!!!!!! help!!! i'm trapped in a universe factory!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! help!!!!!! i'm trapped in a universe factory!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! help!!!!!!!!! i'm trapped in a universe factory!!!! help!!!!!!!!!! i'm trapped in a universe factory!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! help!!!!!!!!!!!!! i'm trapped in a universe factory! help!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! i'm trapped in a universe factory!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! help!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! i'm trapped in a universe factory!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! help!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! i'm trapped in a universe factory!!!!!!!!!! help!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! i'm trapped in a universe factory!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! help!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! i'm trapped in a universe factory!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! help!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! i'm trapped in a universe factory!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! help!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! i'm trapped in a universe factory!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! help!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! i'm trapped in a universe factory!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! help!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! i'm trapped in a universe factory!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! help!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! i'm trapped in a universe factory!!!!!!! ...

I picked the one I liked most and verified its primality with Wolfram|Alpha and numberempire.com.

I’m not 100% sure that all the others are primes, as I used Fermat primality test. However I’m impressed by what I found. Now I can’t stop wondering how much literature, physics or technology could be hidden in prime numbers, in plain English and UTF-8 encoded. :D

(Obviously, I’m perfectly conscious on what’s happening here, but I though this was a nice fact to share. It could also be a nice number to print on a shirt.)

Dear universe factory worker, I’m going to rescue you, sooner or later. Just tell me how.

Sam Hewitt: Ubuntu Icon Requests (Again)

Planet Ubuntu - Sun, 02/15/2015 - 08:00

Hello all, I've resumed taking requests for Ubuntu (phone) application icons, after my hiatus from doing so. I will be creating new & requested icons according to the Ubuntu Iconography Guidelines.

So if you're interested, you can visit this dedicated page I've set up to avail of my offer, or for more information.

Make a Request

Carla Sella: A day with the BQ Aquaris 4.5 Ubuntu Touch edition

Planet Ubuntu - Sun, 02/15/2015 - 07:34


A day with the BQ Aquaris 4.5 Ubuntu Touch edition (part 1)
I was wondering how to let you know the different user experience you have using Ubuntu Touch and in particular  on the BQ Aquaris 4.5 as this is the phone I am using it on.
It's hard to explain how easy and intuitive it's use is, so I decided to try to tell you how I use it.
So let's see what you will find while pretending I am using it during a normal work day, what apps and scopes you can find on itThe first app is the Clock App, you can use this to set an alarm to wake you up in the morning. You can also set different locations around the world to have there local time:


Clock AppAlarm set in Clock App

A quick look at your e-mail using the Gmail scope, this is really handy I set it as my home scope, so as soon as I unlock my phone I get all my e-mails on a handy scope, you can swipe between e-mails, decide to mark them as read and if necessary open them in the Gmail App:


Gmail scopeemail preview in Gmail scope

email in Gmail web app





I am out of home and I need to connect to a WiFi spot to read some news on the news scope, so I swipe from the top to open the indicators, and go to the network tab to connect to a Wifi spot, next I swipe to the news scope and can easily swipe through different news I need to read:
Network tab in indicators panel

News scopeswiping through different news
I need to call my Mom to tell her that my Son is staying at her today after school, so I swipe from the left to reveal the launcher and select the Phone App to call my mom, I can select witch of the two SIMs to use for the call and search for her number on the Contacts App I can open from the Phone App:
revealing the launcher with left swipePhone App
Contacts Appsearching for my mom's number

I need to check my appointments so I swipe on to the Upcoming scope where I can see them all, click on one and eventually decide to open it in the Calendar App (I have my Google calendar synchronized):
Upcoming scopeAppointment detailsCalendar App
Everything is simple and handy, using scopes is really a new and great experience, you can also find aggregated scopes like the Today scope where you have the details of the day, date, day of week, sunrise and sunset time, the weather forecast, favorite contacts, recent calls and messages, activity, today's news and other info...

Today scopeToday scope scrolling down
Today scope scrolling down
Today scope scrolling down


Well there are really many other scopes and apps, but I think this is enough for today, I will be back with other pictures and experiences in the next days, stay tuned.






Costales: BQ Aquaris E4.5 Ubuntu Edition - MI percepción en el uso del día a día

Planet Ubuntu - Sun, 02/15/2015 - 06:03
Tras la review del hardware, SO y aplicaciones, voy a contar mi percepción global del móvil en el día a día.

Llevo apenas una semana con el móvil como único dispositivo, es decir, sin usar mi Samsung Galaxy ACE (exacto, provengo de un móvil de gama muy baja, punto importante). Pongo el MI del título con mayúsculas, porque cada usuario tiene una experiencia de uso distinta y lo que a mi me vale, a otro tal vez no ;)



1

El hardware y acabado del móvil están muy logrados para ser un terminal de la gama de entrada. Lo considero un acierto, pues no hará falta invertir cientos de euros para disfrutar de un móvil con Ubuntu. La cámara consigue un resultado aceptable para su gama (publicaré un post con fotos para que se pueda apreciar su calidad, pero a futuro) y la música por auriculares suena muy bien.


2Los gestos y usos de Ubuntu Phone los aprendí en unos minutos, aunque es al cabo de un par de días cuando ya no te acuerdas de Android para nada.
Precisamente ayer cogí el móvil con Android de mi novia y mi primer gesto fue desplegar el lanzador de Unity desde la izquierda, hasta que me dí cuenta de que no estaba usando un Ubuntu Phone xD Me pasa también en el escritorio del trabajo usando Windows, pero me hizo gracia que en sólo unos días me pase también en el móvil.

Unity es la piedra angular del móvil
Hay algún bug y mejoras que ya reporté. Lógico, es una primera versión de un desarrollo muy complejo. Además disponemos cada 2 semanas de actualizaciones OTA para solventarlos.

Por contra, la usabilidad en esta primera versión es perfecta. Yo no la tocaría ni un ápice. Buscamos Unity en la izquierda, las aplicaciones abiertas en la derecha, la barra de status arriba y la configuración de cada aplicación, si aplica, abajo. A ello, si juntamos los scopes en la pantalla de entrada, ¡chapó!

Sí mejoraría la pantalla de bloqueo, que sólo te indica los mensajes, llamadas, fotos... recibidos. No es muy funcional y podría ser más, por ejemplo habilitando accesos rápido a aplicaciones más usadas o al menos a la aplicación del mensaje.

El diseño es móvil es muy guapo. La mayoría de las aplicaciones nativas son preciosas. Muy buen trabajo.

El uso del móvil recuerda totalmente al Ubuntu de escritorio. Aún no hay convergencia entre móvil y escritorio, pero sí convergencia de uso, ya que estás manejando la misma interface. Unity se deja querer, y mucho :P

3
Antes de tener el móvil pensé que apenas tendría aplicaciones y estaba muy equivocado. Cuando busqué por la Tienda de Ubuntu encontré reemplazos para casi todas las aplicaciones que usaba en Android. Con las 700 y pico aplicaciones que hay ahora mismo, yo apenas tengo necesidad de más. Aunque ese número se debe a que muchas son webapps, que personalmente no me gustan, echando de menos más aplicaciones nativas. Espero que esto cambie a corto plazo. Eso sí, las aplicaciones nativas son muy buenas (Dekko, Telegram, Galería, Música, Tasks...).

Resaltar la facilidad para instalar aplicaciones desde la Tienda de Ubuntu. Un click y está.

También debo decir que hacía meses que quiero abandonar Whatsapp, por lo que este móvil significa todo un querer  y poder.
Poco más que añadir al tweet de Nukeador. Si a la compra de Whatsapp por Facebook le juntamos la NSA, ¿para qué queremos más?

Otro motivo másPara sustituir a Whatsapp disponemos de Telegram preinstalado. Echo muy en falta un cliente de Gtalk.

Una de las cosas que más me gustó es que se fomenta que uses software libre. El sistema operativo es libre (a excepción de drivers de hardware, como el de la CPU), y cuando buscas aplicaciones, la mayoría son libres. No como el Google Play que la mayoría son privativas.


El móvil va muy fluido, no parece que sea de gama de entrada y se nota el trabajo de adaptación a hardware concreto. Para muestra, una comparativa del Ubuntu Phone versión desarrolladores en un Nexus 4 contra este BQ (¿qué pasaría si Ubuntu vendiera sus propios ordenadores?).

4Echo en falta poder hacer tethering y aplicaciones como Feedly y Gtalk. Por lo demás estoy servido.

El resumen es que estoy encantado con este móvil. Hay que darle un poco de tiempo para que se afine más, pero todo es totalmente funcional. La sensación es que manejas un Ubuntu puro bajo una capa de gestos táctiles. Además siendo un Linux, pronto comenzará el hackeo que permitirá hacer cosas que jamás soñamos con un Ubuntu en un móvil.

Como a corto plazo llegue un dock que lo convierta en Ubuntu for Android... esto, arrasa el mercado.

Las fotos son gentileza de Fernando Lanero y David Castañón bajo CC.

Andrea Corbellini: New blog, again

Planet Ubuntu - Sun, 02/15/2015 - 05:23

This must be the third blog I start from scratch. But this time, I’m taking a serious commitment: I’m going to write here regularly.

Wish me luck!

Carla Sella

Planet Ubuntu - Sat, 02/14/2015 - 07:20
MY THOUGHTS ON THE BQ UBUNTU PHONE 

Ubuntu Insider's Event in LondonUbuntu Insider's Event London



After so much waiting the bq Ubuntu Phone has finally been released, I have been so lucky to be an Ubuntu Insider and I was wondering what to write about it as so many have already written reviews on it describing how it works and it's hardware specs.I have passed several days thinking about what and how to write, but today, after reading one of the many reviews and it's comments I have decided to write what I think about it as a Linux enthusiast and part of the Ubuntu Community, oh, and as an "Ubuntu Insider" :-D.

Ubuntu Insider's Event in London
There is so much talking around the bq Ubuntu Phone release and there are so many different points of view and mostly there are a lot of merely hardware reviews, but what I think a lot of people are missing, is that this is the first smartphone with a Linux distribution on it, with Ubuntu on it! (the most famous and world wide spread Linux distribution).

Riccardo Padovani, Carla Sella and Dario Cavedon (all part of the Italian Ubuntu Community)
This is the first release of a Linux smartphone, of a Ubuntu Touch smartphone, and it has been released on a hardware most persons can afford. Yes, it would have been great to have a smartphone like the Ubuntu Edge, but that hardware is not affordable by everyone. With bq's smartphone just released a lot of people can have a chance to take a look at what Ubuntu Touch is like.How many smartphones are there out there with Linux on them ? How many smartphones have an OS you can hack on, write apps for in a easy way ? What I think is that we are lucky to have an occasion like this. We have finally someone who has been able to release an open source smartphone, a Linux smartphone,  a smartphone we can contribute to and make as we would like it to be. To me this is like a dream come true :-D. No porting problems, no hardware that has compatibility problems, we have a smartphone working out of the box and that does not cost too much so that you are unable to buy it.How many times have we been complaining about notebooks and desktops that are not sold with Linux on them ? How many times have we installed Linux on a notebook or desktop we bought with another OS on it and we have had hardware issues ? compatibility problems?Now we have this peace of hardware that comes with Ubuntu on it and we are still not happy about this ? I think this is weird!!!!The only thing left to say is that I am really happy Canonical/Ubuntu - bq have finally released this smartphone, it is affordable by anyone and mainly it comes with Ubuntu Touch on it.Now it's up to us to take the chance, we need to show we appreciate this, we need to tell our point of view, we need to contribute to make this smartphone as we would like it!So come on! don't lose this occasion! jump in and help us make the best smartphone ever!


Dario Cavedon, Carla Sella and David Planella 
Me and Rick Spencer
Me and Oliver Grawert
Dario Cavedon and Me



Carla Sella and Jane Silber

Costales: BQ Aquaris E4.5 Ubuntu Edition - Las aplicaciones

Planet Ubuntu - Sat, 02/14/2015 - 04:43
Un sistema operativo nuevo no tiene aplicaciones >Sin aplicaciones no hay usuarios>Sin usuarios no hay desarrolladores>Sin desarrolladores no hay aplicaciones
¿Repetimos? Mejor no :) que el bucle podría tender a infinito.


Tras la review del hardware y sistema operativo, toca el turno a las aplicaciones.


¿Y qué pasa en Ubuntu Phone?
Pues que Canonical desarrolló las aplicaciones más básicas y otras tantas las desarrollaron usuarios independientes. Sin duda Ubuntu SDK es un gran aliado para crearlas.


Buena integración de una webapp

¿Qué aplicaciones hay?
Echa tú mismo un vistazo (Tienda no oficial):

Ubuntu Touch AppsEstas aplicaciones pueden ser:
  • Nativas: Las mejores; bien integradas, rápidas, optimizadas.
  • Webapps: Palían la falta de clientes nativos como Twitter, Facebook, Instagram...
  • Scopes: Nos dan información en el Tablero de Unity, proporcionando el servicio sin necesidad de abrir la aplicación, una innovación muy interesante.
 Para leer el email Dekko está genial

¿Qué me llamó más la atención de las nativas?
El diseño, las aplicaciones nativas tienen un diseño tan espectacular como el sistema operativo Ubuntu Phone.
 
La mejor galería de imágenes. Y va preinstalada
¿Cómo las instalo?
Desde la Tienda de Ubuntu. Muy fácil, buscas la aplicación y con un solo click, ya está instalada.

Instalar con 1 click

¿Puedo instalar .debs?
Que yo sepa, no.

Aunque una Terminal nativa te permitirá desatar a la bestia

Entonces, ¿Todo es de color de rosa?
No, las aplicaciones nativas cuesta más desarrollarlas y no hay muchas.
Y las webapps son muy fáciles de crear, pero no funcionan sin conexión y no tienen tan buena integración.

webapp para Facebook

Para un sistema operativo que tuvo la primera flash sale hace unos días me sorprendió gratamente encontrar la mayoría de aplicaciones que usaba en Android, incluso algunas tan avanzadas como controles remotos para XBMC.

A falta de una, ¡¡tres!! :O
¿Qué aplicaciones echo de menos?
  • Feedly: Hay muchos lectores RSS, pero no encontré ninguno que se integre con esta plataforma.
  • Remote Transmission: Sé que se puede usar por web, pero no sé por qué no me funciona desde el navegador (ya reporté el bug).
  • Un grabador de voz.
Sorprendente el catálogo inicial¿Y Whatsapp?
Whatsapp no está. La reina de las aplicaciones no está disponible, es el peaje que hay que pagar por ser una aplicación con protocolo cerrado que creó un standard ipso facto entre la sociedad. Si se consigue la suficiente cuota de mercado, sería factible que Whatsapp nos ofreciera una versión, pero mientras tanto, deberemos usar otras alternativas (Un pequeño truco es dejar tu móvil anterior en modo avión para revisar diariamente los mensajes recibidos).

¿Qué alternativas tenemos a Whatsapp?
Telegram. Muy bien integrada y nativa. Pero a parte de Telegram, por ahora no hay otras aplicaciones XMPP, echando personalmente de menos alguna para chatear por Gtalk. Sería genial disponer de Pidgin.

Telegram nos notifica 2 mensajes en el lanzador de Unity
Mis aplicaciones favoritas en Ubuntu Phone
Muchas van preinstaladas, pero otras no.
  • Dekko: Un lector de email con una integración y diseño perfectos.
  • Telegram: ¿Qué decir de la mejor mensajería hoy en día?
  • Terminal: Si quieres desatar a la bestia, esta es tu aplicación.
  • torch: Una práctica linterna.
  • XBMC Web Remote: Para controlar el RaspXBMC en la Raspberry PI.
  • podbird: Un lector de podcast elegante y funcional.
  • Calendar: Diseño espectacular sincronizado con Google Calendar.
  • Forecast: La información más útil antes de salir de casa.
  • Here: Hace el trabajo para orientarnos con los mapas.
  • PdfjsViewer: Imprescindible si manejas PDFs.
  • Readability: Adapta cualquier web para leerla en el móvil.
  • Webapps que más uso: Google+, Booking, Ebay, Trello, Twitter, Google Translate, Youtube.
  • Cut the Rope: Me sorprendió lo bien que van los juegos.
¿He dicho que Dekko me encanta? Pues lo digo otra vez :)Imprescindible Weather, aunque casi prefiero más ForecastUna webapp para organizarme de la mejor manera
Y está imprescindible en mis viajesIntegrado con Google Calendar y el diseño espectacularBonito e intuitivo. Me gustaMapas Here¿Pensabas que no ibas a tener juegos? Las webapps y aplicaciones HTML5 paliarán este punto
¿Y como programador te interesaría desarrollar aplicaciones?
Creo que sí y mucho. Conozco desarrolladores para Android que hacen buenas aplicaciones, pero no las usa nadie porque se pierden entre las 1.000 aplicaciones que hacen lo mismo. Digamos que si desarrollas para iOS o Android lo más probable es que tu aplicación no tendrá relevancia.

Todo lo contrario en Ubuntu, donde la competencia entre aplicaciones apenas ha comenzado y es todo un viejo Oeste americano por conquistar.

En busca de iluminación para mi próxima aplicación. Por cierto, torch es una útil linterna
No puedo finalizar el artículo sin agradecer a David Castañón el gran trabajo realizado con las fotografías, disponibles bajo licencia Creative Commons. ¡Gracies David!

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