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Ubuntu Kernel Team: Kernel Team Meeting Minutes – March 17, 2015

Planet Ubuntu - Tue, 03/17/2015 - 10:41
Meeting Minutes

IRC Log of the meeting.

Meeting minutes.

Agenda

20150317 Meeting Agenda


Release Metrics and Incoming Bugs

Release metrics and incoming bug data can be reviewed at the

http://people.canonical.com/~kernel/reports/kt-meeting.txt


Status: Vivid Development Kernel

Our Vivid kernel remains based on v3.19.1 and we uploaded a
kernel last week. We are approaching kernel freeze for
~4wks away on Thurs Apr 9. If you have any patches which
—–
Important upcoming dates:
Thurs Mar 26 – Final Beta (~1 week away)
Thurs Apr 09 – Kernel Freeze (~3 weeks away)
Thurs Apr 23 – 15.04 Release (~6 weeks away)


Status: CVE’s

The current CVE status can be reviewed at the following

http://people.canonical.com/~kernel/cve/pkg/ALL-linux.html


Status: Stable, Security, and Bugfix Kernel Updates

Status for the main kernels, until today:

  • Lucid – None (no update)
  • Precise – Verification and Testing
  • Trusty – Verification and Testing
  • Utopic – Verification and Testing

    Current opened tracking bugs details:

  • http://kernel.ubuntu.com/sru/kernel-sru-workflow.html

    For SRUs, SRU report is a good source of information:

  • http://kernel.ubuntu.com/sru/sru-report.html

    Schedule:

    Current cycle: 27-Feb through 21-Mar

    27-Feb Last day for kernel commits for this cycle
    01-Mar – 07-Mar Kernel prep week.
    08-Mar – 21-Mar Bug verification; Regression testing; Release


Open Discussion or Questions? Raise your hand to be

No open discussion.

Raphaël Hertzog: Freexian’s report about Debian Long Term Support, February 2015

Planet Ubuntu - Tue, 03/17/2015 - 09:42

Like each month, here comes a report about the work of paid contributors to Debian LTS.

Individual reports

In February, 58 work hours have been equally split among 4 paid contributors. Their reports are available:

Evolution of the situation

During the last month, we gained 3 paid work hours: we’re now at 61 hours per month sponsored by 28 organizations and we have one supplementary sponsor in the pipe that should bring 4 more hours.

The increase is not very quick but seems to be steady. Hopefully at some point, we will have enough resources to do a more exhaustive job. For now, the paid contributors handle in priority the most popular packages used by the sponsors and there are some packages in the end of the queue which have open security issues for months already (example: CVE-2012-6685 on libnokogiri-ruby).

So, as usual, we are looking for more sponsors.

In terms of security updates waiting to be handled, the situation looks a little bit worse than last month: the dla-needed.txt file lists 40 packages awaiting an update (3 more than last month), the list of open vulnerabilities in Squeeze shows about 58 affected packages in total (5 less than last month). We are getting a bit more effective with CVE triage.

A logo for the LTS project?

Every time that I write an LTS report, I remember that it would be nice if my LTS related articles could feature a nice picture/logo that reminds people of the LTS team/initiative. Is there anyone up for the challenge of creating that logo?

Thanks to our sponsors

The new sponsors of the month are in bold.

No comment | Liked this article? Click here. | My blog is Flattr-enabled.

Ubuntu App Developer Blog: Creating a theme for your application

Planet Ubuntu - Tue, 03/17/2015 - 06:18

The theming engine is one of the least documented features of Ubuntu UI Toolkit. While we are preparing to create the third generation theming engine, which will support sub-theming and runtime palette color customizations, there are more and more app developers asking about how to create their own theme for the application itself. There were also questions on how to create a shared theme so other applications can use these themes. But let’s get first the application theming.

The application themes are application specific, and should be located in the application’s installation folder. They can derive from a pre-defined system theme (Ambiance or SuruDark) as well as be standalone themes, not reusing any system defined themes. However this latest one is not recommended, as in this case you must implement the style of every component, which in one way requires lot of work, and secondly it uses few APIs which are not stable/documented.

Assuming the theme is located in a separate folder called MyTheme, the second step would be to create a file called “parent_theme” where you put the URI of the theme your application theme derives from. Your parent_theme would look like

// parent_theme Ubuntu.Components.Themes.SuruDark

Now, let’s change some palette values. The way to do that is to create a Palette.qml file, and override some values you want.

// Palette.qml import QtQuick 2.4 import Ubuntu.Components 1.2 import Ubuntu.Components.Themes.SuruDark 1.1 as SuruDark SuruDark.Palette { normal.background: “#A21E1C” selected.backgroundText: “lightblue”

If you want to change some component styles, you have to look into the parent theme and check the style component you want to change. It can be that the parent theme doesn’t have the style component defined, in which case you must follow its parent theme, and search for the component there. This is the case if you want to change the Button’s style, SuruDark theme doesn’t have the style component defined, therefore you must take the one from its parent, Ambiance. So the redefined ButtonStyle would look like:

// ButtonStyle.qml import QtQuick 2.4 import Ubuntu.Components 1.2 // Note: you must import the Ambiance theme! import Ubuntu.Components.Themes.Ambiance 1.1 as Base Base.ButtonStyle { // Let’s override the default color defaultColor: UbuntuColors.green }

For now only a few style component is exported from the two supported system themes, in case you see one you’d like to override just file a bug. Then there are only a handful of style APIs made stable, therefore overriding the non-documented styles may be dangerous, as their API may change. The stable style APIs are listed in Ubuntu.Components.Styles module and their implementation and unstable APIs are in Ambiance and SuruDark themes.

And finally you can load the theme in the application as follows:

// main.qml import QtQuick 2.4 import Ubuntu.Components 1.2 MainView { // Your code comes here // Set your theme Component.onCompleted: Theme.name = “MyTheme” }

That’s it. Enjoy your colors!

P.S. A sample code is available here.

Sam Hewitt: Dead-Simple Pancake Recipe

Planet Ubuntu - Tue, 03/17/2015 - 03:00

Pancakes, who doesn't love em? So I'll share my easy pancake recipe –which is a few steps simpler and requires a bit less effort than my other recipe/method. Plus, I use a set of ratios that is easy to remember. 1 cup each flour & milk, 1 tablespoon each sugar & baking powder + 1 egg. Combine all, fry in butter.

Yes, that is peanut butter and maple syrup –don't knock it 'til you try it.
    Ingredients
  • 1 cup flour
  • 1 cup milk
  • 1 tablespoon sugar (optional)
  • 1 tablespoon baking powder
  • 1 egg
  • butter, for frying
    Directions
  1. Sift the flour, sugar and baking powder together in a bowl.
  2. Add the milk to the dry ingredients and whisk together thoroughly.
  3. Crack the egg and whisk it into the batter.
  4. Preheat a griddle or non-stick pan
  5. Add some butter and heat until it just begins to sizzle.
  6. Ladle out batter onto the griddle/pan –into the butter– to a desired radius.
  7. Flip only when you begin to see bubbles surface and the edges beginning to brown.
  8. Serve with your choice of condiments.

Riccardo Padovani: Two years later...

Planet Ubuntu - Mon, 03/16/2015 - 17:00

In three days firsts Ubuntu phones will be send to real users, people who paid to buy them. It’s amazing and exciting, and it’s incredible to think that a little company as Canonical was able to create a OS for smartphones in two years.

But what happened on March 17th, 2013?

Well, it’s incredible to say looking to what I’m doing now, but there was my first contact with international Ubuntu Community. I posted this image in the Ubuntu community on Google+:

Seems like another era! How much work the community (and Canonical guys) have done since then! Then I started to contribute to Ubuntu for Phones: few days later I did my first patch (nazi grammar patch :-P) and since July I started to contribute on an ongoing basis. It has been two exciting year, I did more than 660 commits for more than 65,000 lines of code; not bad, whereas I had never programmed before and I do it in my free time. Plus, I made one app, one scope, I joined a couple of Canonical Sprints. I really hope write code will soon become a job for me :-)

But take a look on where we are. This is a screenshot on Ubuntu 15.04, on a smaller screen:

Awesome! In two years so much improvements! And calendar has the desktop mode!

Just to do a compare, take a look on the same screen last year:

We’re building the future :-)

So, why don’t you start to contribute to Ubuntu?

You know, I’m a student and I do all this in my free time. So, if you like my work and want to support me, just send me a Thank you! by email or offer me a coffee :-)

Ciao,
R.

Stuart Langridge: Chrome improves Add To Home Screen. Sorta

Planet Ubuntu - Mon, 03/16/2015 - 15:38

So, Chrome improve their add to home screen feature. Yay! Finally! This is great!

Well. It’s sorta great.

There are two ways of viewing the point of “add to home screen”. The first is as a sort of super-powered bookmark. It’s a favourite which you can get at really easily, without having to open the browser and go fishing around in your bookmarks menu. The second way is that it’s essentially “install this app”, but for web apps rather than native apps. And nobody’s very sure what it’s supposed to mean.

This causes tension.

Native apps get to say “install our app” without providing a link, a QR code, whatever: people know how to do that. You can write it on posters or TV adverts: “StuartApp is the greatest new thing! Install from the App Store or Google Play”. And everyone knows what that means: open up the App Store or Google Play app and search for StuartApp, and touch Install. How do you install my web app? Well, the poster could say “install our web app: StuartApp.com”, and I think people would get that they type that into the browser. No problem there. But then installation is a problem, because it’s browser-specific and it’s a pain in the arse. It’s quite difficult to install a web app (by which I mean “bookmark it to the home screen”1) in iOS Safari2, and it’s really difficult in Android Chrome. what Chrome have done now supposedly makes it easier. If your web app is prepared to be installed (it’s got an icon, a manifest, and so forth), Chrome will offer your users the chance to install it when they use it. This is great.

Well. It’s sorta great.

You see, the Chrome team don’t want to hassle users to install apps when they don’t want to. So the automatic “install this” prompt won’t appear until the second day you’re using that web app. This is good from the point of view of not hassling people, and not hassling people is important. But it is no improvement at all for people who want to deliver an app (which is what people have been conditioned to want) but do it on the web (which is the best way to do it, if you can). Before this release, I couldn’t say “install our app: StuartApp.com” (because doing so was too hard), and now I still can’t say it, because you have to come back twice over two days.

How popular would Clash of Clans be if you couldn’t install it until the second day you played it, I wonder?

I get that there are constraints here. What the Chrome team are trying to avoid is having every site you visit say “install me as an app! Install me! DO IT! INSTAAAAAAAALL!” every time you go there, and they are wholly right with this concern. But from a practical perspective, “install my app” when I want to deliver it on the web is no better now than it was a month ago. Which is not forward progress.

There are a couple of pernicious ideas here which should be nipped in the bud. The first is that I’ve seen it suggested that perhaps if you prove to be a good app developer who doesn’t hassle people, maybe those restrictions will be relaxed. But who decides whether you’ve been bad or good? The Google Chrome team. I do not want them to be gatekeepers. I really don’t. The web is a better way at least partially because we’re not praying that a big corporation will let us play in their sandbox. Bringing the iOS/Android approval model to the web defeats the point. If it’s possible to build a web app which provides a better-than-native install experience but only if Google permit it? Not useful. (And Apple are hardly going to implement that.)

The second pernicious thing is people who believe that “bookmark to home screen” means “grant extra privileges”. Specifically, there’s a whole bunch of “aha! They added this to the home screen! That means they trust it! So now we don’t have to do geolocation permission popups!” thinking. This is wrong thinking. Android, which demands all possible permissions up front, is the most eloquent demonstration imaginable of why this is a dreadful idea. And the sausage machine works in reverse here too: if you start with the idea that web apps on the home screen are privileged, then you will instinctively want to make adding to home screen be hard, because it’s an implicit grant of privilege. And so someone who wants discoverability and doesn’t care about free access to the address book gets screwed.

Adding to home screen is not a declaration of trust. It’s a declaration of interest. I want this thing in my life more. I don’t want more of my life in it.

Apple have this right: ask for permissions when you need them, not when the user first uses the app.

So. It is, at least in theory, a good idea to change and incrementally improve the add-to-home-screen experience, and it’s great that the Chrome team are working on this. But I think that as an attempt to make the web install experience easier than the native one, which it really could be… this hasn’t made as much forward progress as we might hope.

  1. although Matteo Spinelli’s brilliant add to home screen iOS Safari library makes it easier
  2. other iOS browsers can’t do it at all; it’s a secret Safari-only feature

Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 408

The Fridge - Mon, 03/16/2015 - 14:26

Welcome to the Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter. This is issue #408 for the week March 9 – 15, 2015, and the full version is available here.

In this issue we cover:

The issue of The Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter is brought to you by:

  • Paul White
  • Elizabeth K. Joseph
  • And many others

If you have a story idea for the Weekly Newsletter, join the Ubuntu News Team mailing list and submit it. Ideas can also be added to the wiki!

Except where otherwise noted, content in this issue is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License BY SA Creative Commons License

Matt Bruzek: Kubernetes

Planet Ubuntu - Mon, 03/16/2015 - 13:37

It occurred to me that it might be helpful or at least interesting to describe what we have been working on with the Kubernetes project.

Kubernetes is a open source system for managing containerized applications (Docker processes) across multiple hosts. The Kubernetes project is from Google, so it works with Google Compute Engine (GCE) but also runs on many other cloud environments (AWS, Azure, vSphere).

Containers

Docker and containers are very popular in the IT industry. Containers are similar technology to Virtual Machines (VMs) with some important differences. They share the operating system means that they can be more efficient than a separate VM that has its own operating system. You can create many containers inside a VM or a bare metal creating what our industry calls density.

Docker containers are great but they do have limitations. Since the containers share the operating system containers can only communicate within the host. Running Docker services on different servers requires some additional software to talk with other hosts. Kubernetes packages all the tools to facilitate communication between hosts, also adding software to do load balancing and service discovery to manage containers on different servers.

Kubernetes

Kubernetes is a software project written in go and is a very active project on github at the time of writing. The idea is you should be able to run kube-up.sh for the cloud environment you are using to deploy the software and services you need to run a Kubernetes cluster in a public cloud.

This post will not go in depth to Kubernetes concepts or terminology such as Kubernetes master and minons. That is beyond the scope of this short post, but you can read more about that if you are interested.

Juju does the work, so you do not have to!

Juju is an orchestration tool that makes it easier for people to deploy a Kubernetes environment to multiple clouds. The value to this is we can deploy Kubernetes on different cloud environments that are not yet supported by the Kubernetes project.

We have written charms that encapsulate the kubernetes software and related technologies such as flannel and etcd. The charms handle all the requirements and prerequisites for those tools configuring them and setting them up automatically. We also created Juju bundles that make it easier to deploy the Kuberentes servers (using Juju) and relate them on any cloud environment that Juju supports (AWS, Azure, HP public cloud, Joyent, OpenStack, Digital Ocean, and MAAS). The Juju parts also aim to build in operational intelligence that users need to manage a Kubernetes cluster.

My colleague Charles Butler has been working on getting the kube-up.sh script to work with Juju. Once that work is done we plan to contribute that code to the Kubernetes project so everyone can deploy a Kuberentes cluster with Juju.

How can I deploy Kubernetes today?

A very easy way to deploy Kubenetes technologies today is to deploy a bundle. We have instructions on how to get started using Juju.

Once you have Juju Quickstart installed it is just one command:

juju quickstart https://raw.githubusercontent.com/whitmo/bundle-kubernetes/master/bundles.yaml

The basic kubernetes bundle consumes four VMs in the cloud. Juju allows you to easily scale up the minion VMs to create a cluster however large you want.

Please help us!

We are just in the initial stages of the integration with Kubernetes. We are always looking for feedback or contributions. Everything from ideas on better integration with Kubernetes services, to handling standard operational duties on Kubernetes, or ways to make this complex group of software easier to understand.

Zygmunt Krynicki: Lantern update

Planet Ubuntu - Mon, 03/16/2015 - 13:05
Hey

Lantern is progressing nicely today. I've received a number of submissions and it seems that brightness ranges are all over the place. Thanks to everyone that has contributed. This data will be very useful for analysis and the more you can send, the better.

I wanted to test a theory, that firmware-based brightness control device, one that is based on /sys/class/backlight/*/type being equal to firmware, keeps the panel dim but lit when brightness zero is requested a raw driver will happily turn the panel backlight off. This is a common issue with many laptops. There is no consistent behavior. Users don't know what to expect when they hit the brightness control all the way down.

To test that theory I've created a test provider for plainbox (which is the project I'm hacking at work most of the time). It's a big change from a tiny script that fits on one's screen to a large (it's large!) body of code feeding of a pretty big set of data files and scripts.

I did this to ensure that the solution is scalable. We can now do interactive tests, we can use i18n, we can do lots of complicated things that are useful as we expand the library of tests. Using a toolkit simply helps us along the way in ways that simple shell scripts cannot hope to.

Currently I've added two interactive tests:
  • test that checks if software brightness control works at all
  • the brightness zero test I've outlined above
There's also a number of supporting jobs that detect and enumerate devices, collect logs and put this all together. You can see all of the details here.

So once again, I'd like to ask for your help. Look at the instructions and run the test suite. It takes about a minute on my laptop. Less if you already know all the instructions and don't have to follow along. As before, send submissions to my email  address at zygmunt.krynicki<at>canonical.com. If you come across any problems please report them.

You can also contribute translations (see the po/ directory for the familiar stuff), tests and discussions.

Thanks
ZK

Kubuntu Wire: Vivid, with Plasma 5 is dedoimedo’s new favorite desktop

Planet Ubuntu - Mon, 03/16/2015 - 04:59

http://www.ocsmag.com/2015/03/13/plasma-is-my-new-favorite-desktop/

“But the thing is, the more I’m using it, the more I’m loving it.”

“Seriously, tell me, how can you not like Plasma. It looks the part, it acts professionally, everything is simple and intuitive, and even when placed on a beta version of an upcoming Kubuntu release, it’s still reasonably good for daily use. Sure, you should not test this on production systems, but imagine the possibilities. Taste the class. Soon, you’ll be able to properly enjoy Plasma.”

Zygmunt Krynicki: Is max_brigthness coming from a random number generator?

Planet Ubuntu - Mon, 03/16/2015 - 01:47
First off, thank you for sending contributions to Lantern. Please keep them coming, we really need more data for meaningful statistics.

Now for the main dish: I wonder what's the cause of the seemingly random values of /sys/class/backlight/*/max_brightness as seen in the wild.

Currently I have instances of each of those:

[7, 10, 15, 89, 100, 255, 312, 494, 825, 852, 937, 976, 1808, 2632, 3828, 4437, 4438, 4882]
So one laptop has 7 steps of backlight intensity, another has 312, 976 and some have 4882. What is the cause of such a wide range of values? Can the hardware be the cause? But then again, are engineers that built this really so careful to expose, say 852 values instead of 825, or 100.

Given how most backlight control from user's point of view works, apart from smooth transitions that some Windows 8 laptops do, 25 would be way more than enough values.

If anyone has some input on what may be causing this, I'd love to hear that. I'll start working on improving the analysis script to do some correlation between the CPU type, GPU type and observed values.

Dimitri John Ledkov: My IDE needs a makeover

Planet Ubuntu - Sun, 03/15/2015 - 16:30
Current SetupI am a Linux Distribution Engineer and work on arbitrary open source projects. Mostly I'm patching/packaging existing things, and sometimes start fresh projects.

My "IDE", or rather I shall say "toolbox" is rather sparse:

  • GNOME Terminal
  • Google Chrome
  • GNU Emacs
  • GCC toolcahin with GDB
  • Python3 - iPython, iPdb, pyflakes
  • git, GNU bazaar
There are a few things that annoy me, and should be done better these days.DocumentationI lookup documentation mostly with Google Chrome. This includes the texinfo renderings of the docs. There are a few reasons for that. First of all my developer machine is not polluted with all the dev packages under the sun, instead I compile practically everything in a chroot. And most of the time chroots have much newer versions of everything (from gcc & automake, to boost and whatever other dependencies are in use). However I would like to have easy generic lookup builtin for common things that I lookup in the references and which have not changed for a long time:
  • gcc builtins & defines
  • glibc functions
  • automake/autoconf functions definitions
Given that my preferred editor is Emacs, it should be natural to use `info' mode to look things up. However, the rendering there is archaic and is really hard to read. At least when visiting the HTML renderings, the function names are in bold and stand out from the rest of the description.
Ideally I would have unified place to lookup docs, instead of using Google Chrome and navigating: gnu.org, gnome.org, readthedocs.org, freedesktop.org.Project ManagementI really hate "traditional" IDEs that create and pollute the working directories with random extra files. My project management tool is VCS, thus .git should be automatically recognized as a "project". I should be able to navigate repository files, have them scanned for tab-completion and jumping to symbols and the like. At the moment, I exit the editor and use git grep to find things and open those files in the editor again. I don't use any tagging systems at the moment, ideally git repository would be scanned and Exuberant Tags (this seems to be the latest hotness in tagging space) stored inside the .git directory automatically."SDK" aware aka chroot supportThe IDE should be aware of chroots, how to compile things in a chroot and ideally how to compile packages with sbuild, mock or obs build (these are apt, yum and zypper preferred solutions for package compilation). Most importantly to use those chroots to tag includes headers for tab completion.ShellGnome Terminal is good enough for my needs. I do have a problem of too many terminal windows... I have tried Terminator (a tiling single-window / multiple-tabs terminal). However during development the things I use shell for, should be part of the IDE directly: changing projects, opening/closing/navigating/creating files, invoking build, invoking debug, "refactoring" (sed). I think I do want to try out a pull-down terminal for temporal look-ups together with a tiling "main" terminal. Or ideally ditch it all together. Emacs does provide multiple terminals, but when I did that I ended up with "inception" -> launching an instance of emacs, inside the terminal, inside emacs...ConclusionIf anybody has tips or suggestions do share. I will investigate and experiment with all of the above, and see if I can experiment and find new cool things that work better than my current setup.

Carla Sella: Ubuntu IT web site Ubuntu-IT web app

Planet Ubuntu - Sun, 03/15/2015 - 14:11
So I also made it! I created my first web app for Ubuntu Phone!
So now the Italian Ubuntu Community has it's web app for it's web site: http://www.ubuntu-it.org.
I followed the official tutorial here: https://developer.ubuntu.com/en/web/tutorials/web-app-tutorial/
and it was easy and fast.
So if you have a site you would like to have an Ubuntu Phone web app for, just go for it, it's easy and fast.


Ubuntu-IT web appUbuntu-IT web app

Ubuntu-IT web app
Ubuntu-IT web app
Ubuntu-IT web app
Ubuntu-IT web app
Ubuntu-IT web app
Ubuntu-IT web app
Ubuntu-IT web app

Zygmunt Krynicki: Lantern

Planet Ubuntu - Sun, 03/15/2015 - 12:26
So you've probably seen my earlier post asking for data contributions.

This quick post is a follow-up to that, to say Thank You to everyone that contributed data, shared my post or replied with useful feedback

This is just the beginning of the nascent project I've called Lantern. I have a few extra tools in the works and I will describe them properly when I'm ready. The culmination of this process will be an attempt to determine:
  • If the kernel interface works
  • If brigthness==0 is "dim but visible" or totally off
  • If brigthness control via hardware keys is reflected in what the kernel sees
  • If brigthness control via software is confusing the firmware (when manipulated by the hardware keys)
  • If X and vt* are behaving differently (most of the time that is the case)
In the end the results might impact the Ubuntu certification process (which is what I do at Canonical). I will share all the tools I've made and data I've collected.

Zygmunt Krynicki: Crowdsourcing help needed! Share your /sys/class/backlight please!

Planet Ubuntu - Sun, 03/15/2015 - 08:32
I'm working on a little mini-project that deals with back-light.
I've read the kernel documentation I could find [1], [2], [3], [4] and I poked all my systems to see what values are produced. I only have a number of intel and intel/nvidia systems. I don't have any AMD portables at home. I would really like to see how they behave.

Towards that end I wrote a little tool that collects the most common properties (type and brigthness ranges) and dumps that to a tarball, along with the output of uname, lspci and a few others (nothing sensitive or personally-identifiable though). You can grab the tool from [5].

If you want to help me out please run the script and send the results to my email address  at zygmunt<dot>krynicki<at>canonical.com.

Thanks!

The Fridge: Ubuntu Membership Board call for nominations extended

Planet Ubuntu - Sat, 03/14/2015 - 21:51

Back on February 17th I put out a call for nominations for the Ubuntu Membership Board.

Unfortunately we have not gathered enough applicants yet to meet our criteria for staffing the board.

As I mentioned in my prior call, this is a valuable role for both the applicant and our community as we recognize the significant and sustained contributions made by fellow contributors to Ubuntu through formal membership, as overseen by this board.

Speaking more personally, a position on a membership board one of the first roles in the international Ubuntu community I was appointed to, and someone else nominated me. So I encourage you reach out to your fellow Ubuntu Members to ask if they wish to be nominated or encourage them self-nominate for a position on the board.

To nominate yourself or somebody else (again, please confirm they wish to accept the nomination and state you have done so), please send a mail to the membership boards mailing list (ubuntu-membership-boards at lists.ubuntu.com). You will want to include some information about the nominee, a launchpad profile link and which time slot (12:00 or 22:00) the nominee will be able to participate in.

Further details, including qualifications to be considered for a position on the board, can be found on the initial call for nominations.

We are extending this call for another 2 weeks, so please have your nominations to the board by Monday March 30th at 12:00 UTC.

To all of those who have already submitted your name for consideration, thank you and we appreciate your patience as we complete this process.

Originally posted to the ubuntu-community-team mailing list on Sun Mar 15 04:43:25 UTC 2015 by Elizabeth K. Joseph, on behalf of the Ubuntu Community Council

Ubuntu Membership Board call for nominations extended

The Fridge - Sat, 03/14/2015 - 21:51

Back on February 17th I put out a call for nominations for the Ubuntu Membership Board.

Unfortunately we have not gathered enough applicants yet to meet our criteria for staffing the board.

As I mentioned in my prior call, this is a valuable role for both the applicant and our community as we recognize the significant and sustained contributions made by fellow contributors to Ubuntu through formal membership, as overseen by this board.

Speaking more personally, a position on a membership board one of the first roles in the international Ubuntu community I was appointed to, and someone else nominated me. So I encourage you reach out to your fellow Ubuntu Members to ask if they wish to be nominated or encourage them self-nominate for a position on the board.

To nominate yourself or somebody else (again, please confirm they wish to accept the nomination and state you have done so), please send a mail to the membership boards mailing list (ubuntu-membership-boards at lists.ubuntu.com). You will want to include some information about the nominee, a launchpad profile link and which time slot (12:00 or 22:00) the nominee will be able to participate in.

Further details, including qualifications to be considered for a position on the board, can be found on the initial call for nominations.

We are extending this call for another 2 weeks, so please have your nominations to the board by Monday March 30th at 12:00 UTC.

To all of those who have already submitted your name for consideration, thank you and we appreciate your patience as we complete this process.

Originally posted to the ubuntu-community-team mailing list on Sun Mar 15 04:43:25 UTC 2015 by Elizabeth K. Joseph, on behalf of the Ubuntu Community Council

Charles Butler: GPG Made a comeback in my workflow

Planet Ubuntu - Sat, 03/14/2015 - 21:46

GPG (Gnu Privacy Guard) is a piece of software that can basically do two things:

  • encrypt/decrypt every kind of data so that only you or the persons you choose are able to read/use it.
  • sign/verify data so that you can be sure that the data originates from the person you think it originates from.

Link to the official GPG project

Why use it?

Whether or not you want to use encryption is of course up to you. Something that many people don't seem to keep in mind is that E-mail is not confidential in any way. It's as if you were writing on postcards, not even using an envelope. Everyone who happens to handle the e-mail or access the account on the server can read the entire mail without you noticing. If you want any modicum of privacy in your email, tweets, documents, chats - you should defininately consider it. I encrypt my mail traffic and have started signing my mails so recipients have it on good faith that the email has originated from me.

Should they want to send me something in private, the fact I'm signing these e-mails with my public key affords them the opportunity to do so. It's a win/win - you know it's me, and you can talk to me in secret if you have some account credentials to mail over (for example).

Keybase.io

I really have to applaud the efforts of keybase.io, trying to make security through GPG a popular item again. I've recently seen the volume of PGP verified mail subside as we move to a more mobile web. Abandoning cryptography in the wake of convenience of swiping communications off screen, and not really caring who the originator was. We take full faith from the From: line assuming our Big Provider has done their due dilligence in keeping out the riff raff.

Keybase makes it easier for cryptography noobies to get started, by giving them a Browser based implementation of OpenPGP. There are some concerns there by security experts - as there should be. But there's nothing stopping you from using normal GPG with the service - and uploading only your public key to Keybase.

In Addendum, they also offer a public verification service - where you can sign messages with your GPG key and have them verified in keybase - to identify that you are who you say you are across some of the most popular online networks.

Pretty cool!

Remebering GPG

I'm not one for digging through manpages every time I forget something. Call me strange - but I really like the format of an infographic, or a cheat sheet. So that's exactly what I did. Enjoy! It's released under a Creative Commons By-SA license. Feel free to fork, modify, and re-distribute. Together we can put the "not a crime" back in "Cryptography is not a crime!"

Download the SVG

Dimitri John Ledkov: Intel CPU microcode support in ubuntu-drivers-common

Planet Ubuntu - Sat, 03/14/2015 - 08:19
Ubuntu Vivid Vervet 15.04 is on its final approach to release at the end of next month. Here is a highlight of one of the features that I have helped to land.

ubuntu-drivers-common is a framework to detect hardware-dependent components on user's machine and offer to install additional packages to enable better support for such hardware. Typical examples are drivers for the graphics cards. This cycle I have added CPU family detection plugin, which helps to detect cpu family and install appropriate microcode update. E.g. if one is running Intel CPU, intel-microcode package is installed.

Check out:
$ ubuntu-drivers devices
$ ubuntu-drivers list
$ ubuntu-drivers autoinstall

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