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Jonathan Riddell: Plasma 5.8 LTS Kickerd Off for Stability and Performance

Planet Ubuntu - Fri, 07/08/2016 - 03:38

Plasma 5.8 has its Kickoff meeting yesterday and we Kickered the plans into shape.  The big news is it’ll be an LTS release with bugfix releases coming out for 18 months after the .0.  This matches Qt 5.6 which is also on an LTS schedule and we’ll still to 5.6 as the minimum Qt version for Plasma 5.8 LTS.  Full schedule on wiki.

As an LTS cycle we will focus on stability and performance for the 5.8 release.

The exception is for work on Wayland which won’t get LTS support but we do hope to be feature complete in time for the 5.8 release in October.

We went over the Plasma To Do board and tidied it up and added some new items.

And you can look forward to talks at Akademy by David and other Plasma developers, plus BoF sessions through the week.

To help out with Plasma developing say hi in #plasma on Freenode.

 

by

Canonical Design Team: Getting Vanilla ready for v1: the roadmap

Planet Ubuntu - Fri, 07/08/2016 - 02:47

We have been using our front end framework Vanilla across our sites for a while now, so it might surprise you to know that its first official version (let’s call it v1) hasn’t yet been released.

In preparation for v1 (which we are tentatively aiming for early September), there are a few tasks that we have been, and will be, working on to make sure that Vanilla is as robust as we can make it, and to make the process of using and improving it clear.

Future-thinking: defining a high level roadmap

It’s important that long-term, ongoing projects have defined goals that people can focus on and strive for. Having short, mid and long-term goals makes it easier to prioritise and concentrate efforts on tasks that will get you closer to achieving the ultimate vision for the project.

The first thing we did in order to outline a roadmap for Vanilla was to collect all the things that we felt needed to happen for it to be ready for release, things we’d like to improve, and wishlist items that might not be urgent but that we would like to tackle at some point in the future.

With this list at hand, we organised the tasks by priority and added them to a roadmap board in Trello, which is open for anyone to have a look at. You can see which tasks we are working on during the current two-week sprint, and which tasks are queued to be done next.

 

The Vanilla framework roadmap Trello board

 

Contributing: defining the process for adding new patterns

Releasing Vanilla v1 does not mean that Vanilla will then be finished. As a working style guide that is used across Canonical on various different projects with different needs, new patterns will emerge and existing ones will have to be improved to be more flexible.

We thought that it would be good to document the process that a pattern should follow in order to become a Vanilla pattern, so after a little bit of brainstorming, we created a diagram that shows the different steps that should be taken from before submitting a pattern proposal to its full acceptance as a Vanilla pattern.

Most of the steps in the diagram happen in just a few seconds, but it is good to be able to visualise the entire process.

 

Diagram of the process to submit a new pattern to Vanilla

 

As Vanilla itself, this process diagram is not really finished. Once we start using it more frequently, we will probably have to make some adjustments to improve it. Also, there are a few branches of the process that we still need to include, namely how a pattern is added to a theme as opposed to the main Vanilla framework, and how an existing pattern (in a website of Vanilla theme) can be promoted to Vanilla.

As part of this task, we also updated the existing GitHub template that pops up when you submit a new issue on the Vanilla repository to include the option of submitting a pattern proposal.

The proposals will be reviewed on a fortnightly basis by the web team during the Vanilla working group meetings. We are pondering how we can make these meetings open to anyone who’d like to participate, as we know that lots of you would like to contribute with new patterns and improvements. We’d be happy to hear your ideas on how this could work.

Defining browser support guidelines

While internally, in the web team, we tend to agree on and follow consistent browser support guidelines, the process isn’t documented.

We want to make sure that Vanilla is built following the latest web standards, and that people can build sites with it that will work on as many form factors as possible, so we thought defining the browser support guidelines that we want contributors to follow was a vital step in preparation for the v1 release.

The document isn’t yet finished, but we are working on it as we speak and will be sharing it soon enough.

Future tasks

You can see the roadmap that we have planned for Vanilla in preparation for v1 and after in Trello, but there are few key tasks that we want to carry out before September that we’d like to highlight:

  • Defining the accessibility standards that all patterns will have to follow, and adding automated tests to the build process to ensure they are adhered to
  • Conducting an internal accessibility audit and making as many changes as we can to improve accessibility
  • Redesigning the dedicated Vanilla website to include the new documentation we are writing and other pieces of useful information, including the style guide itself — all living together in one single site
  • And, obviously, making sure that Vanilla has its own logo — as any respectable framework does :)
Final words

This is all from me for now! Barry is writing a companion post that will go into more detail about the technical tasks that are being done on Vanilla, which he will be publishing soon.

We would love to know if you have any ideas on how to improve Vanilla — share your thoughts in the comments.

David Tomaschik: Hacker Summer Camp Planning Guide, Part II

Planet Ubuntu - Fri, 07/08/2016 - 00:00

In February, I wrote a guide to planning travel for BSides, Black Hat, and DEF CON, occasionally referred to as “Hacker Summer Camp.” In my original post, I promised an update with information about your actual travels to BSides, Black Hat, and DEF CON: what to bring, what to do, and how best to stay out of trouble. This is my best advice on that, but I’m sure others have differing opinions.

Health and Safety

I discussed the idea of managing your energy in the first post, but I can’t stress enough how important that is. Las Vegas is hot, there’s a lot going on, and so it’s easy to not realize how much you’ve burned yourself out. Take your time and don’t try to do everything – it’s not possible and you’ll make yourself sick in the process.

DEF CON 101 attendees will hear about the “3-2-1” rule. No, it’s not some new variation on the TSA’s 3-1-1 rule, it’s the guideline for personal survival at DEF CON: 3 hours of sleep, 2 meals, and 1 shower. Per day. Every day. Please follow at least this! Many days you may want to shower more than once, and I’d strongly encourage that – you’ll be packed into rooms with 15,000 of your (soon to be) closest friends, and there’s nothing that will make it harder to network and meet people than smelling like a gym with no ventilation. So I will also add: use deodorant. If you start to smell, take a shower, don’t just try to cover it up with some kind of body spray. Body spray just means you smell like sweat and some $4.99 crap you got from the checkout register.

This is a good time to mention hydration: it’s Las Vegas, which means it will be dry and hot, which is the recipe for dehydration. So is moving around a lot. So you need to always be drinking, and I don’t just mean Beer, Gin & Tonic, or Vodka & Red Bull. Drink lots of water. If at any point you get headaches, nauseated, or generally feel like crap, odds are you’re dehydrated and water will help. Money saving tip: if you want bottled water, buy water from a drugstore or convenience store on the strip (or if you’re driving, bring it with you). It will be much cheaper than buying it in any of the hotels.

Finally, a word about physical safety: keep your wits about you. DEF CON gets attendees of all sorts, and you’re in Las Vegas, a city known for clueless tourists, so there’s plenty of opportunity for thieves and other criminals. Know where your stuff is at all times, and don’t leave it unattended. Don’t look like a conference attendee outside the hotel, and if you’re out very late at night, being with others will help ensure your safety.

What to Bring What to Wear

Read the weather forecast, but you can pretty much count on hot & dry. And when I say hot, I mean like 40°C (100°F +, for those of you not working in SI units). DEF CON is a highly informal conference – t-shirts and shorts or jeans are probably the “average” attire. If you want to look more professional, you’ll be fine too, unless you wear a suit. Then you’ll stick out like a sore thumb. BSides is approximately the same, Black Hat tends more towards business casual, though you’ll see plenty of t-shirts & jeans here too. Generally, wear whatever your comfortable in in hot weather.

Electronics

The network at DEF CON has been called the most hostile network in the world, but I suspect that’s a little overblown. That being said, it’s probably a good idea to treat it as highly hostile – better safe than sorry.

At a minimum:

  • Backup your data in advance
  • Fully patch
  • Full disk encryption
  • Firewall enabled
  • Use a VPN & SSL-enabled sites
  • Don’t click past SSL warnings

Other possible considerations:

  • Don’t bring sensitive data at all
  • Use a different hard drive
  • Use a different device
Picking your devices

What electronics you want to bring will depend on what you want to do. Some activities will require a laptop: CTFs, Capture the Packet, Badge Hacking (most likely). If you want to participate in these or something similar, you’ll want to bring a laptop. Otherwise, I’d encourage you to leave the laptop at home, or at least in your hotel room. (Being mindful, of course, of theft and evil maid attacks.)

It’s obviously hard to go without a cell phone, but you may want to consider using a different phone from usual, for several reasons. This would give you the option to give out a number to arrange parties, events, etc., but not have them have your permanent contact information (as can various services) but also protects you against attacks on your devices. (There have been a lot of 3g/4g and mobile attacks lately, so it makes sense to pay attention there.)

Other things to Bring
  • Cash: DEF CON tickets are cash-only, and you might want cash for cabs, drinks, etc. I’d recommend against using the ATMs in the immediate vicinty of the cons – you never know who’s found an 0-day or brought a skimmer!
  • Notepad and pen: old fashioned note taking is sometimes the best.
Activities

There’s a lot of things to do in this week, and I’d like to focus on 3 principle ideas to help in choosing what to do:

  • Don’t try to do it all – you just can’t
  • Be active, not passive
  • Try new things
Talks

Obviously, these conferences are best known for their talks and presentations, but I don’t actually consider those the most important reason for attending. I’ll attend a few talks, but since they’re nearly all recorded, I can always see the talks later. Attend talks that are of personal interest, but don’t force yourself to sit in the audience of a talk every hour – that’s being passive, and you won’t get as much out of things.

Villages

DEF CON hosts a number of villages each year, housing various demonstrations and activities, including the Lockpicking Village, Wireless Village, Packet Capture Village, and Tamper Evident Village. Each one will have talks and activities focusing on that particular aspect of “hacking”, and are great opportunities to learn something new from people who are extremely passionate about their niche. Some of the things you can try doing:

  • Analysis of packets from the network
  • Pick locks
  • Try to open tamper-evident containers without leaving a trace
  • Hunt for hidden wireless devices

The content from the villages is often not available anywhere else, so if you see a topic that you’re interested in, you should definitely pay them a visit.

Parties

It’s probably not a secret that there are parties in Las Vegas during this week. Many of these are great opportunities to get to know other security professionals and enthusiasts, discover what people are working on, and generally network. You never know when you might meet your next coworker. :)

Conclusion

I hope this has been helpful in your Hacker Summer Camp planning. Got a question? Check out /r/defcon or I’m @Matir on twitter.

Dirk Deimeke: Linkdump 27/2016 ...

Planet Ubuntu - Thu, 07/07/2016 - 20:28

In der letzten Woche habe ich sehr viele mittellange Artikel gelesen (und auch viele gelöscht), meine Leseliste ist jetzt runter auf 205 Artikel, vor einigen Wochen waren es noch knapp 300.

Es ist zwar nicht die Lösung aller Probleme, gleicht aber die fehlenden "Vorbilder" ein wenig aus, Was Arbeiterkinder zum Studium ermuntert.

Zehn WTF-Erkenntisse aus Europas größter Jugendstudie, tja, wer hätte es gedacht, die Jugend tickt anders als es sich Menschen vorstellen, die 30 Jahre älter sind.

Eine unglaubliche Erfolgsgeschichte: Perry Rhodan wird 80 Jahre alt!.

Eine Stadt in Schweden testet den 6-Stunden-Arbeitstag — mit überraschenden Ergebnissen und mit wirklich hohen Mehrkosten, wenn man die in den Griff bekommt, ist das vielleicht der Weg der Zukunft.

Wir tauschen einfach viel E-Mail durch viel Slack. Das Geheimnis hinter dem Hype.

Arbeitszeugnisse sind ein totes Pferd! Stimmt absolut, eine Tätigkeitsbeschreibung würde reichen.

Es ist immer wieder sehr interessant, wie sich die Innenwahrnehmung vom Bild von Aussen unterscheidet. Der Image-Schaden hält sich in Grenzen.

blog/tech/SocialProblemsAndTechnicalDecisions I do not agree in total, but it is worth thinking about.

Es gibt einen einleuchtenden Grund: Darum schläft man in fremden Betten schlechter.

6 Tips to Successfully Manage Teams, sincerely Captain Obvious.

Ab einem bestimmten Level spielt es sicherlich weniger eine Rolle, aber das ist generationsunabhängig, Warum es Studenten auch heute nur ums Geld geht.

Unser Standort ist unser klarer Nachteil - sehr spannend, wie man aus einem Standortnachteil einen Vorteil machen kann.

So richtig ja leider nicht, Regierung gibt offenbar Widerstand gegen freie Wlan-Netze auf.

Freunde müssen nicht antanzen, wenn wir digitale Nomaden pfeifen gilt für Leute, die die Heimatstadt aus anderen Gründen verlassen oder gar auswandern im gleichen Mass.

Ich nehme die Antwort vorweg, nö: Wollen Sie nicht Agent werden?.

10 basics today’s journalists need are different fromn what you might expect.

The other side of the story, Firing People.

Slack, I’m Breaking Up with You, yes, it does not solve any problem and shifts messages from an established medium, to a new one.

Auch "agil" ist nicht die Lösung aller Probleme, Stacey, Cynefin, oder warum zelebriert der Dienstleister Agil?.

Schluss mit dem Selbstbetrug, hier geht es nicht um die AfD, sondern um den Umgang mit dieser Partei. Wahre Aussagen!

Yip, true, period. Multitasking Is Killing Your Brain.

Adam Stokes: SOSreport 3.3 released

Planet Ubuntu - Thu, 07/07/2016 - 09:20

SOS team is pleased to announce the next release of SOSreport v3.3!

New upstream release. This release includes a number of enhancements, new features, and bug fixes, including:
  • Support for OpenShift Enterprise 3.x
  • Improved and expanded OpenStack plugins
  • Enhanced support for Open vSwitch
  • Enhanced Kubernetes data collection
  • Improved support for systemd journal collection
  • Policy support for the SuSE family of Linux distributions
  • Policy support for the IBMKvm hypervisor distribution
  • Enhanced display manager and 3D acceleration data capture
  • Improved support for Linux clusters, including Pacemaker
  • Expanded CPU and NUMA topology collection
  • Expanded mainframe (s390x) coverage
  • Collection of multipath topology
Debian modifications :
  • Addition of DEP8 tests
  • Do not run Python2 only tests

Ubuntu Insights: Daniel Holbach: Contributing to the world of snaps

Planet Ubuntu - Thu, 07/07/2016 - 08:59

Zygmunt Krynicki wrote about the availability of bite-sized bugs for the snapd project.

I took this as an opportunity to go through the snapcraft bugs as well and tag a few as bitesize myself. snapcraft is written in python, nicely commented documented and comes with a comprehensive test-suite. The people working on it are a lovely bunch and very helpful. So if you are interested in publishing software and have some knowledge in how a certain class of projects is built, you could do a lot of good here.

If you can’t write python or go (for snapd) code, that’s fine – there are lots of other ways to help out:

This is an exciting time for Ubuntu and other distributions – we’re making software much more easily available.

Ubuntu Insights: Getting started: Creating Ubuntu Apps with Cordova

Planet Ubuntu - Thu, 07/07/2016 - 08:56

A few weeks ago we participated in Phonegap Day EU. It was a great opportunity to meet with the Cordova development team and we had a range of app developers gather for this occasion.

The latest Ubuntu 16.04 LTS release was demoed, running on a brand new BQ M10 tablet in convergence mode. Creating responsive user interfaces is already a common topic for web developers, and Cordova developers by extension.

On the second day, we hosted a workshop on developing Ubuntu applications with Cordova and popular frameworks like Ionic. Alexandre Abreu also showed his new cordova-plugin-ble-central for Ubuntu. This one lets you connect to an IoT device, like one of those new RPI boards, directly to an Ubuntu app using the Bluetooth Low Energy stack. Snappy, Ubuntu and Cordova all working together !

Last but not least, we started the release process for cordova-ubuntu 4.3.4. This is the latest stable update to the Ubuntu platform support code for Cordova apps. It’s coming along with a set of documentation updates available here and on the upstream cordova doc site.

We’ve also made a video (20 mins) to summarize this and walk you through the first steps of creating your own Ubuntu app using Cordova – which you can view below.

We’d also love to hear from you if you have any ideas especially seeing what you can do with the new release and plugins.

Cordova Ubuntu Demo App on the Store >

Ubuntu Insights: The difference an OTA can make!

Planet Ubuntu - Thu, 07/07/2016 - 08:55

Just over 2 months ago we launched our first convergence device, the Aquaris M10 Ubuntu Edition tablet with partners BQ. Since then we’re constantly working to evolve the platform to provide better overall performance and speed with our Over-the-Air updates (OTA.)

Our OTA updates are released approximately 6-8 weeks apart from each other and are our moments to celebrate as they bring about these developments.

Our last OTA-11 saw overall performance improvements to the M10 that included speed, bluetooth connectivity and smoother scrolling – summarised in the video by Richard above. And luckily these changes were picked up by journalists which are summarised below!

Tech Republic – Ubuntu Touch OTA-11 brings about serious improvements to the platform

Toms Hardware – Canonical fixes Convergence issues with OTA 11 update

Slash gear – Verdict and 10 things to know about Ubuntu BQ Aquaris M10

Learn more about the M10 tablet >

Costales: uWriter for Ubuntu Phone: A basic offline word processor

Planet Ubuntu - Thu, 07/07/2016 - 08:18
I would use only 1 word: productivity.

But a picture is worth a thousand words...

#productivityA 100% free(dom) app for a free(dom) phone :)

Install on your Ubuntu Phone/Tablet
Oh! And use a bluetooth keyboard & mouse for a full PC experience ;)

Daniel Holbach: Contributing to the world of snaps

Planet Ubuntu - Thu, 07/07/2016 - 07:59

Zygmunt Krynicki wrote about the availability of bite-sized bugs for the snapd project.

I took this as an opportunity to go through the snapcraft bugs as well and tag a few as bitesize myself. snapcraft is written in python, nicely commented documented and comes with a comprehensive test-suite. The people working on it are a lovely bunch and very helpful. So if you are interested in publishing software and have some knowledge in how a certain class of projects is built, you could do a lot of good here.

If you can’t write python or go (for snapd) code, that’s fine – there are lots of other ways to help out:

This is an exciting time for Ubuntu and other distributions – we’re making software much more easily available.

The Fridge: Ubuntu 15.10 (Wily Werewolf) reaches End of Life on July 28 2016

Planet Ubuntu - Thu, 07/07/2016 - 07:30

Ubuntu announced its 15.10 (Wily Werewolf) release almost 9 months ago, on October 22, 2015. As a non-LTS release, 15.10 has a 9-month month support cycle and, as such, the support period is now nearing its end and Ubuntu 15.10 will reach end of life on Thursday, July 28th. At that time, Ubuntu Security Notices will no longer include information or updated packages for Ubuntu 15.10.

The supported upgrade path from Ubuntu 15.10 is via Ubuntu 16.04. Instructions and caveats for the upgrade may be found at:

https://help.ubuntu.com/community/XenialUpgrades

Ubuntu 16.04 continues to be actively supported with security updates and select high-impact bug fixes. Announcements of security updates for Ubuntu releases are sent to the ubuntu-security-announce mailing list, information about which may be found at:

https://lists.ubuntu.com/mailman/listinfo/ubuntu-security-announce

Since its launch in October 2004 Ubuntu has become one of the most highly regarded Linux distributions with millions of users in homes, schools, businesses and governments around the world. Ubuntu is Open Source software, costs nothing to download, and users are free to customise or alter their software in order to meet their needs.

Originally posted to the ubuntu-security-announce mailing list on Thu Jul 7 12:16:48 UTC 2016 by Adam Conrad, on behalf of the Ubuntu Release Team

Ubuntu 15.10 (Wily Werewolf) reaches End of Life on July 28 2016

The Fridge - Thu, 07/07/2016 - 07:30

Ubuntu announced its 15.10 (Wily Werewolf) release almost 9 months ago, on October 22, 2015. As a non-LTS release, 15.10 has a 9-month month support cycle and, as such, the support period is now nearing its end and Ubuntu 15.10 will reach end of life on Thursday, July 28th. At that time, Ubuntu Security Notices will no longer include information or updated packages for Ubuntu 15.10.

The supported upgrade path from Ubuntu 15.10 is via Ubuntu 16.04. Instructions and caveats for the upgrade may be found at:

https://help.ubuntu.com/community/XenialUpgrades

Ubuntu 16.04 continues to be actively supported with security updates and select high-impact bug fixes. Announcements of security updates for Ubuntu releases are sent to the ubuntu-security-announce mailing list, information about which may be found at:

https://lists.ubuntu.com/mailman/listinfo/ubuntu-security-announce

Since its launch in October 2004 Ubuntu has become one of the most highly regarded Linux distributions with millions of users in homes, schools, businesses and governments around the world. Ubuntu is Open Source software, costs nothing to download, and users are free to customise or alter their software in order to meet their needs.

Originally posted to the ubuntu-security-announce mailing list on Thu Jul 7 12:16:48 UTC 2016 by Adam Conrad, on behalf of the Ubuntu Release Team

Ubuntu Podcast from the UK LoCo: S09E19 – Perfectly Preserved Brain - Ubuntu Podcast

Planet Ubuntu - Thu, 07/07/2016 - 07:00

It’s Episode Nineteen of Season Nine of the Ubuntu Podcast! Mark Johnson, Alan Pope, Laura Cowen, and Martin Wimpress are here again.

We’re here – all of us!

In this week’s show:

That’s all for this week! If there’s a topic you’d like us to discuss, or you have any feedback on previous shows, please send your comments and suggestions to show@ubuntupodcast.org or Tweet us or Comment on our Facebook page or comment on our Google+ page or comment on our sub-Reddit.

Ubuntu Studio: Backports, the benefits and the consequences.

Planet Ubuntu - Thu, 07/07/2016 - 03:11
Ubuntu Studio is happy to announce that backports are going to be rolling out soon and the first one will be Ardour. Backports are newer versions of applications, ported back to stable versions of the system. For example in the case of Ardour, Ubuntu Studio users running 14.04 or 16.04 will be able to have […]

Daniel Pocock: Can you help with monitoring packages in Debian and Ubuntu?

Planet Ubuntu - Thu, 07/07/2016 - 02:14

Debian (and consequently Ubuntu) contains a range of extraordinarily useful monitoring packages.

I've been maintaining several of them at a basic level but as more of my time is taken up by free Real-Time Communications software, I haven't been able to follow the latest upstream releases for all of the other packages I maintain. The versions we are distributing now still serve their purpose well, but as some people would like newer versions, I don't want to stand in the way.

Monitoring packages are for everyone. Even if you are a single user or developer with a single desktop or laptop and no servers, you may still find some of these packages useful.

For example, after doing an apt-get upgrade or dist-upgrade, it can be extremely beneficial to look at your logs in LogAnalyzer with all the errors and warnings colour-coded so you can see at a glance whether your upgrade broke anything. If you are testing new software before a release or trying to troubleshoot erratic behavior, this type of colour-coded feedback can also help you focus on possible problems without the eyestrain of tailing a logfile.

How to help

A good first step is simply looking over the packages maintained by the pkg-monitoring group and discovering whether any of them are useful for your own needs.

You may be familiar with alternatives that exist in Debian, if so, feel free to comment on whether you believe any of these packages should be dropped by cre
ating a wishlist bug against the package concerned.

The next step is joining the pkg-monitoring mailing list. If you are a Debian Developer or Debian Maintainer with upload rights already, you can join the group on alioth. If you are not at that level yet, you are still very welcome to test new versions of the packages and upload them on mentors.debian.net and then join the mentors mailing list to look for a member of the community who can help review your work and sponsor an upload for you.

Each of the packages should have a README.source file in the repository explaining more about how the package is maintained. Familiarity with Git is essential. Note that all of the packages keep their debian/* artifacts in a branch called debian/sid while the master branch tracks the upstream repository.

You can clone the Debian package repositories for any of these projects from alioth and build them yourself, try building packages of new upstream versions and try to investigate any of the bug reports submitted to Debian. Some of the bugs may have already been fixed by upstream changes and can be marked appropriately.

Integrating your monitoring systems

Two particular packages I would like to highlight are ganglia-nagios-bridge and syslog-nagios-bridge. They are not exclusively for Nagios and could also be used with Icinga or other monitoring dashboards. The key benefit of these packages is that all the alerting is consolidated in a single platform, Nagios, which is able to display them in a colour-coded dashboard and intelligently send notifications to people in a manner that is fully configurable. If you haven't integrated your monitoring systems already, these projects provide a simple and lightweight way to start doing so.

Svetlana Belkin: What Programs Do I Use: Thunderbird Mail

Planet Ubuntu - Thu, 07/07/2016 - 02:11

As I said before, I like to use and support FOSS and one of the other programs that I use is Thunderbird Mail for my e-mails, calendar, and task list.  I tried other e-mail clients, but Thunderbird always stuck with me.  Why?  Because it has good support for multiple e-mail accounts and the addons make it easier to consolidate programs

Like Firefox, I have a two addons to make it more useful in my workflow:

  • Lighting: My calendar and task list.  Because I don’t use G-mail, I don’t need the addon that makes Lighting work with G-mail- I use Fastmail.fm for my e-mail.  Yes!  I pay for my e-mail, but it’s better than trusting Google.
  • Bamboo: A RSS reader.  I’m not sure if I will move on to something where I can sync since I have two devices but this one will do for now.

Thunderbird is a wonderful preinstalled program for users that want an e-mail client.  Try it out!

Adam Stokes: SOSreport 3.3 released

Planet Ubuntu - Wed, 07/06/2016 - 07:52

SOS team is pleased to announce the next release of SOSreport v3.3!

New upstream release. This release includes a number of enhancements, new features, and bug fixes, including:
  • Support for OpenShift Enterprise 3.x
  • Improved and expanded OpenStack plugins
  • Enhanced support for Open vSwitch
  • Enhanced Kubernetes data collection
  • Improved support for systemd journal collection
  • Policy support for the SuSE family of Linux distributions
  • Policy support for the IBMKvm hypervisor distribution
  • Enhanced display manager and 3D acceleration data capture
  • Improved support for Linux clusters, including Pacemaker
  • Expanded CPU and NUMA topology collection
  • Expanded mainframe (s390x) coverage
  • Collection of multipath topology
Debian modifications :
  • Addition of DEP8 tests
  • Do not run Python2 only tests

Costales: New uNav for Ubuntu Phone! Convergence + Fast POIs + Offline maps!

Planet Ubuntu - Wed, 07/06/2016 - 06:51
Thanks to the work of Nekhelesh Ramananthan and Joerg Berroth this is the best uNav version ever! |o/
I'm so excited to announce the improvements...  :))

Convergence:

One app, any device!
Fast (custom) Nearby POIs:
And custom them in an easy way!



and...

It's the time!
But this time everything will not be good news. We had to migrate to a W/B map because of the new Mapquest's ToS. We hope to find an alternative ASAP.


In this release I want thank you to Matthias Apitz and Aurelio Cilia for their support and help with maps and the Ubuntu QA team for its hard work in each release! ;)


uNav

Ubuntu Insights: Canonical and Pivotal Collaborate to Deliver Cloud Native Platform

Planet Ubuntu - Wed, 07/06/2016 - 06:00

  • Ubuntu to Become Preferred Linux OS for Pivotal Cloud Foundry Leveraging Canonical’s Ubuntu Advantage (UA) Support Services
  • Automated Approach to Security Patch Management Provides Game-changing, Rapid Response Approach to Linux Vulnerabilities for Pivotal Cloud Foundry Customers
  • Future Commitment to Formalize Industry Security Certifications for the Best Practice Use of Ubuntu within Cloud Native Platform Deployments

SAN FRANCISCO AND LONDON, July 6th, 2016 – Canonical and Pivotal® jointly announce today a collaboration to provide secure certified Ubuntu images within the Pivotal Cloud Foundry® platform. This collaboration brings together two of the world’s leading open source products: Pivotal Cloud Foundry and Ubuntu, the most widely used Linux distribution on the planet.

Tight collaboration between the companies has benefited both communities, partners and customers. With the continued commercial success of Pivotal Cloud Foundry and demands from its Federal and Regulated customers, Pivotal and Canonical are working to harden Pivotal Cloud Foundry’s distribution of Ubuntu operating system for DISA STIG and CIS Benchmarks.

“Widespread enterprise adoption in both cloud and physical machines, predictable release quality every six months, an unequalled package portfolio, an excellent security track record, and outstanding leadership around Linux Containers makes Ubuntu Pivotal’s preferred operating system for Pivotal Cloud Foundry customers,” said Joshua McKenty, Head of Platform Ecosystem at Pivotal.

“Ubuntu on Pivotal Cloud Foundry brings together the leading Linux OS and Cloud Native Platform for Enterprise scale-out cloud deployments,” said Dustin Kirkland, Ubuntu Product and Strategy at Canonical. “Customers will also benefit from all of Canonical’s professional service and support facilities when they choose Ubuntu images on Pivotal Cloud Foundry.”

Pivotal and Canonical are also working together to create and formalize an industry standard set of security certifications for the use of Ubuntu with a Cloud Native platform and will provide further details later in the year.

For more information please go to http://pivotal.io/platform.

About Pivotal

Pivotal’s Cloud Native platform Pivotal Cloud Foundry drives software innovation for many of the world’s most admired brands. With millions of developers in communities around the world, Pivotal technology touches billions of users every day. After shaping the software development culture of Silicon Valley’s most valuable companies for over a decade, today Pivotal leads a global technology movement transforming how the world builds software.

Ubuntu App Developer Blog: Announcing new snap desktop launchers

Planet Ubuntu - Wed, 07/06/2016 - 03:07
Background

Integrating desktop applications with snaps has been a little bit challenging in terms of getting them looking and behaving as part of the system. This means following general desktop theming, having global application menu integration, getting the icon caches, getting configuration keys and such. Also, the technologies and toolkits like GTK, Qt, demand a little bit of expertise on that front.

That's the reason why we saw flourishing some desktop helpers like gtkconf or qtconf as cloud snapcraft parts for this. However, they were sharing little code and some part of the integration was working for one flavor and not the other flavor and vice-versa.

New desktop launchers to the rescue!

This is the reason why we are announcing new destkop launchers! The goal was to streamline the experience and ensuring that all following user visible features are working, independent of the toolkit or technology you are using:

  • Bind with current desktop theme if shipped by default (GTK & Qt)
  • Icons theme available for decoding (with the right decoders automatically shipped)
  • Application menu integration (in Unity)
  • Icon cache and images generated on first launch (no more need to ship pre-compile GSettings and Gio caching modules) after a new upgrade
  • Keep previous xdg-based data, even after upgrade
  • GSettings keys available for reading (not only writing)
  • Most of the code is shared between the launchers, so any fix in one will benefit others, and we assemble them at build time.
  • Avoid erratic behavior like cd $SNAP that some launchers were doing and not others (we don't change the current working directory anymore)

     

Those new cloud parts also ship with default package set configuration to ensure all features are enabled, this is overridable as well, as explained by Sergio in his blog post.

Qt-based applications also show those drastic improvements. Note that the appmenu fix for Qt applications will only work starting with snapd 2.0.10.

   

Definition and usage

We currently have 5 launchers, depending on the technology you want to support: gtk2, gtk3, qt4, qt5 and glib-only for a lightweight, non graphical app, but needing basic integration like GSettings and MIME types.

Those are grouped under the "desktop" namespace from the snapcraft cloud part functionality, with extensive help on how to use them:

$ snapcraft define desktop/qt5
Maintainer: 'Snapcraft community <snapcraft@lists.snapcraft.io>'
Description:  |
  Helpers for gtk2, gtk3, qt4 and qt5 or glib minimal launchers.
  It brings the necessary code and exports for binding and using those
  desktop technologies in a relocatable fashion, enabling binding with
  global desktop theme, icon theme, image caching, fonts, mimetype handlers
  application global menu and gsettings integration.
  It also brings basics ubuntu dependency packages.
  .
  Usage:
    1. add "after: [desktop/<technology>]" to your launcher:
       - gtk2, gtk3, qt4 and qt5 corresponds to their respective toolkit
         main dependencies and default choices.
       - glib-only enables to compile mime types and gsettings infos. If you
         added your own graphical drivers, it will link them as well.
    2. prepend your command with "desktop-launch", like:
       commands: "desktop-launch foo" if foo is in $PATH. You can as well
       specify: "desktop-launch $SNAP/foo".
    3. add needed plugs to your application:
       - for graphical application:
         plugs: [x11 (or unity7 for appmenu integration)]. Think about adding
         opengl if you need hw acceleration.
       - if your application needs access to sound:
         plugs: [pulseaudio]
       - accessing to user's home directory:
         plugs: [home]
       - read/write to gsettings:
         plugs: [gsettings, home]
         (note that the home plug is needed to read new value)'
desktop/qt5:
  build-packages:
  - qtbase5-dev
  - dpkg-dev
  make-parameters:
  - FLAVOR=qt5
  plugin: make
  source: https://github.com/ubuntu/snapcraft-desktop-helpers.git
  source-subdir: qt
  stage-packages:
  - libxkbcommon0
  - ttf-ubuntu-font-family
  - dmz-cursor-theme
  - light-themes
  - shared-mime-info
  - libqt5gui5
  - libgdk-pixbuf2.0-0
  - libqt5svg5
  - appmenu-qt5

(Note that the descriptions are for now common to any namespaces launchers)

Migrating from gtkconf/qt4conf/qt5conf

As part of this journey, I wanted to see this applied in the real world and migrated all snappy playpen examples to this new launchers. I was delighted to see that some of the goals, like having smaller snapcraft.yaml was a success. Also, broken examples are now fully integrated to the desktop (see some of the pictures above).

Migrating is the existing gtkconf/qt4conf/qt5conf (we plan to deprecate them after a while) is a 2 minutes job:

  1. Replace: after: [<xxx>conf] with after: [desktop/<xxx>] where <xxx> is the targeted toolkit.
  2. Change command: gtk-launch (or qt-launch) foo with commands: desktop-launch foo. For simplicity, all launchers are now called "desktop-launch". Note that foo needs to be in $PATH for your snap, if it's not, replace it to $SNAP/foo.
  3. You can (not mandatory) clean up any build-packages or stages-packages that are shipped and expose in the desktop launcher definition.

By following those simple steps, you can get from an unthemed, no matching icons and no appmenu VLC to a fully integrated one!

Happy snap desktop integration! :)

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