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Dustin Kirkland: Finally: dock your Unity launcher an the bottom of your desktop!

Planet Ubuntu - Tue, 04/05/2016 - 19:46

This makes me so incredibly happy!

Here's how...

First, start with a fully up-to-date Ubuntu 16.04 LTS desktop.

sudo apt update
sudo apt dist-upgrade -y

Then, install dconf-editor.

sudo apt install -y dconf-editor

Launch dconf-editor and find the "launcher" key and change it to "bottom".

sudo dconf-editor


For good measure, I triggered a reboot, to make sure my changes stuck.  And voila!  Beauty!

:-Dustin

Xubuntu: My media manager: gmusicbrowser

Planet Ubuntu - Tue, 04/05/2016 - 11:17

Xubuntu 16.04 LTS will be the first Xubuntu release without a default media manager. To help those without a favorite one, we’ve put up this series where some of the Xubuntu team members talk about their favorite media managers. Later in the series we discuss some cloud services and other media manager options in the Ubuntu repositories. Enjoy!

This time we’re covering the latest (and for now, the last) default media manager in Xubuntu – gmusicbrowser. In addition to using gmusicbrowser, both of the interviewees have been working with gmusicbrowser – and were the ones that convinced others to include it as the default media manager in Xubuntu in the first place. Let’s see what they have to say!

How do you listen to music?

Pasi: My collection is relatively large (6k+ tracks), considering I own most of the albums physically. I like my music to be organized well and with lots of metadata so I can quickly search and browse the collection and get to listen to what I want.

Simon: I’ve been using gmusicbrowser for listening to and – almost more importantly – organizing my music for several years. Even though I’ve recently been drifting towards mobile usage it is still my go-to solution on laptops and desktops.

Why is gmusicbrowser the best choice for you?

Simon: I was long looking for a solid, Gtk+ based music collection organizer which would work reasonably well on old hardware when I found gmusicbrowser. It was part of my entry into the Open Source world, so I’m also emotionally attached to it.

What attracted me in the first place was the performance (yeah, I know, it’s Perl! ;)) and the easy way of customizing the User Interface using its unique UI scripting language.

Pasi: The best thing in gmusicbrowser is the customizability; both for the look and feel but also for the potential it has to organize your music in a dozen ways. As I mentioned before, I like lots of metadata. My music isn’t only organized by artist, album, year (and other generic fields), but also by country of origin, language of the vocals, original artist, media format (CD, CDEP, CD single, 7″ vinyl…) and more. The reason why this is particularly accessible is that you can search from the tags with Google-like syntax in gmusicbrowser; for example, “year:2015” shows me all of the tracks from the year 2015, and “vocals:instr” shows me all the instrumental tracks in my collection (and “year:2015 vocals:instr” all the instrumental tracks from 2015…)!

Another thing I prefer in apps generally is that they keep on the background when I’m not dealing with them. The Shimmer layout for gmusicbrowser does exactly this: it loses many of the unnecessary buttons, making the user interface clean, but isn’t dumbed down; there’s still plenty of things available within a few clicks when I do need to access those features.

Have you customized gmusicbrowser?

Simon: Naturally! I’ve worked on creating the layout (“Shimmer Desktop”) which went on to become the default in Xubuntu – a story which went on for several years in fact. Plus I developed a plugin for gmusicbrowser (“Similar Artists”) using the API of last.fm to create potentially endless automatic playlists based on “similar artist” matches.

Pasi: Yes, a lot. In addition to co-working on the Shimmer layout mentioned by Simon, the extra tags I mentioned before are created with the custom field UI in gmusicbrowser. I have also tweaked the main view to show more of the metadata when browsing through the collection. This saves me time because I don’t have to access another view – or the physical album.

Have you used other media managers in the past?

Pasi: During the time I’ve been using Linux exclusively, the two other media managers I’ve used for a longer time are Amarok and Listen.

In 2006 when I converted to Linux, I started using Amarok and got involved with their marketing team “Rokymotion” – my work with the team included working on artwork and more, including one splash screen for a release. I was (and am) convinced that the 1.4 series of Amarok was the best media manager of its time; when work on 2.0 began, I drifted away since the new UI with all the bling wasn’t my cup of tea.

One thing I actually still miss from Amarok is the “random albums” mode, where skipping a track would always skip to the first track of another random album. This album would then be played until all of the tracks were played from that album, or the user skipped a track once again.

While Amarok was a full-fledged media manager, Listen was something from the lighter end of the bunch. I even used the compact UI with only the basic playback buttons and a simple list of all the tracks (at that time, likely 4–5 thousand). I liked how it definitely help me focus on the music, nothing else. However, I do consider that Listen was as an intermediary manager – a kind of compromise – until I found the next complete media manager I wanted to use. Unfortunately, it seems like the project hasn’t been active for several years now, so it likely isn’t something to look for.

Simon: I have. I started with xine and later Parole, then several Winamp-style players, but always missed the “collection management” part that gmusicbrowser does so well.

Is there something else you would like to share with us?

Pasi: As with all application groups and the operating systems, it’s important to remember that objectively speaking, there is no “best” option. This is why I can only recommend that you try gmusicbrowser, not promise you will love it! Finally, remember that all applications have their quirks (and bugs!) – gmusicbrowser too. Once you get over the initial hurdles, you will notice that there is a powerful, customizable media manager behind the potentially confusing first look.

Simon: I would say gmusicbrowser is a player for (almost) anyone. While it seems to have a bit of a learning curve for the occasional user – and I would argue that the complexity implied by “collection management” is responsible for that – it has immense potential for the afficionado!

Finally, feel free to talk about your favorite artists!

Simon: I can’t say that I have a favorite artist. Probably I could list one per genre, but then again, what or where are genre borders really? Recently I have to developed some affection for some of Chilly Gonzales’ musical (ad)ventures, but as everything this may be a transient phenomenon.

Pasi: I seem to have a soft spot for some britpop; Athlete, Starsailor and Thirteen Senses are three of my favorite artists! Generally speaking I do listen to pretty much everything and anything – at least once.

Ubuntu Insights: Canonical Cloud Chatter: March 2016

Planet Ubuntu - Tue, 04/05/2016 - 09:41

The focus for March has been preparing for our presence at the OpenStack Summit next month. We also announced our collaboration with Tele2 on moving their Network and IT infrastructure to the cloud. As always, you can learn more about Juju, MAAS, LXD and partner ecosystem updates in this month’s newsletter.

Webinar: Discover the Cloud and Scale Out World of Ubuntu on IBM

At our next webinar, Dustin Kirkland will provide use cases and demonstrate advanced tooling that completely simplifies large, complex scale out applications and operations. You’ll learn about the hot workloads in business today and the reason why Ubuntu has been the defacto choice. Finally, see why IBM is a great choice for Ubuntu and how to get immediate access on your existing IBM infrastructure.

Register for webinar

The LXD 2.0 Story

In the ramp up to LXD 2.0, we are featuring a series of twelve blog posts to get you to grips with LXD since the project was launched over 18 months ago. From installation and configuration, to debugging and everything in between – this is a LXD masterclass not to be missed!

Case studies: how to spin up services in minutes

Flexwebhosting , one of the largest web hosting providers in the Netherlands, significantly reduced their time to service by choosing BootStack and Juju. VIP Internet, one of the leading Internet companies in the Netherlands, are now able to spin up new services and deploy to customers in minutes thanks to Juju.

If you want to read all about the latest tips and tricks you can do with Juju and upcoming events in the Juju newsletter.

Renting bare-metal (as as Service) with MAAS

MAAS was created from scratch with one purpose: API-centric bare-metal provisioning. The API-driven aspect of MAAS makes it particularly suited to embedding in wider systems. We are actively working with our integration partners on bringing MAAS into service providers that are keen on delivering bare metal APIs for their end-customers.

MAAS automates all aspects of hardware provisioning, from detecting a racked machine to deploying a running, custom-configured operating system.
Read the article here

Delivering Cloud Storage using Ubuntu

As storage requirements grow practically unbounded, users need reliable infrastructure to hold their data. Software-defined storage is the only cost-effective way to deliver cloud services that fulfill that demand. The Ubuntu Storage approach provides a variety of software-defined software platforms, each of which brings different features and strengths.

In The News

Tele2, one of Europe’s most innovative telecom operators, recently announced that it will move its Network and IT infrastructure to the cloud, paving the way for future investment and network build out to 5G. By using Canonical’s managed hosting teams and automation tooling Tele2 will accelerate the rollout of NFV, reduce costs and focus internal resources on the creation of new services.

Partner Highlights

The Charm Partner programme welcomed credativ, an independent open source software consultancy, providing a full range of free software services for the private and public sectors. credativ created the Juju charm for OpenERP, and will maintain a number of other open source charms including Django, PostGres and Squid.

Upcoming events OpenPOWER event

Our team will be at the OpenPOWER Summit in San Jose, booth 1213, from 5-8th April. We will be chairing the ISV Roundtable event and you can watch our keynote on Building OpenPOWER Momentum. We look forward to seeing you there!

OpenStack Summit, Austin

We will be at the OpenStack Summit in Austin from 25-28th April. Visit us at booth A20, where we will be running demos of our newest solutions. We will also be hosting the Ubuntu and OpenStack Talks on Monday from 11.15 am – 3.30 pm in room MR 12 A/B, Level 4. If that’s not enough, you’re invited to join us at the Container Bar during the Community Party, have a free taco at our Food Truck or enter one of our competitions to win some exciting prizes. See you in Austin!

Jorge Castro: New wiki bundles for you to play with...

Planet Ubuntu - Tue, 04/05/2016 - 09:19

I’ve pushed new sample bundles to the Juju Charm Store. The first is a simple mediawiki with mysql:

For a more scalable approach I’ve also pushed up a version with MariaDB, haproxy, and memcached. This allows you to add more wiki units to horizontally scale:

I’ll be working on a “smoosh everything onto one machine” bundle next, so stay tuned!

Robert Ancell: Five hundred days using Ubuntu Phone

Planet Ubuntu - Tue, 04/05/2016 - 01:24
Today is my five hundredth day of using the Meizu MX4 Ubuntu Edition exclusively as my mobile phone. This is a nice piece of hardware (good power, good camera and simple but elegant design).

Here's what I've learnt.

I have written a bunch of phone apps you can install and blogged it. Writing for the Ubuntu phone is by far the easiest platform I've developed for. Click packaging works really well and the speed at which you can release to the Ubuntu store and get the update on your phone is incredible. QML allows you to build beautiful apps quickly however can be a challenge when apps get more complicated. Qt / C++ is functional, but feels lacking compared to more modern languages. If I could get Swift and an improved QML working together I'd be very happy. I initially used the Ubuntu SDK for building and deplying the apps but have now switched to doing everything on the command line (I've never found an IDE that doesn't feel over-engineered).

There's more than enough apps in the store to keep me happy. In fact, I have installed far more apps than I ever did on my Android phone. I think that is because I really trust the Ubuntu store in a way I never did in Android (too much crap there).

I initially thought webapps wouldn't be useful but they're a good option when there's no native app. I use webapps for social networking and news sites and am pretty happy with that. They're definitely not as good as a native app but feel slightly more integrated than just visiting using your web browser.

Scopes. I can see there's something there in the concept but even though I've tried I've never found them useful. The only scope I have is the app scope (i.e. the traditional grid of applications). I'm hoping a few more iterations and they will find a place on my phone.

Love getting updates. Both system and app updates occur frequently and bring improvements. Unless you had a Nexus device you are more or less abandoned in the Android world - with Ubuntu the complete opposite.

The polish is not quite there compared to Android, but it's getting better quickly. There's little quirks / crashes that are annoying but nothing that stops me from using it all day. A couple more releases and the unforgiving mainstream will be able to thrash it too.

Here's to another five hundred days!

The Fridge: Nominations to the Tech Board

Planet Ubuntu - Mon, 04/04/2016 - 18:51

The nominations for Ubuntu Technical Board are, in no particular order:

  • Ben Collins
  • Kees Cook
  • Steve Langasek
  • Jason de Rose
  • Marc Deslauriers
  • Adam Conrad
  • Stéphane Graber
  • Mathieu Trudel-Lapierre
  • Didier Roche
  • Paul Sladen
  • Sebastien Bacher
  • Robie Basak

We are very fortunate to have such an excellent group of nominees, and I am confident that the Ubuntu developer community will choose well.

I’d like to thank both the most recent technical board, who have (literally gone well beyond the call of duty in their commitment to the stewardship of Ubuntu, as well as this group of nominees for their willingness to stand for this critical role.

I will ask the Community Council to setup and run the CIVS election in standard Ubuntu fashion, and wish all of the candidates the best.

I have done a rather bad job of the process this time around, taking far too long to firm up the list of candidates for no good reason, and so will ask the Community Council to run the TB nomination process next time, while retaining my short-listing rights.

Originally posted to the technical-board mailing list on Mon Apr 4 12:25:39 UTC 2016 by Mark Shuttleworth

Nominations to the Tech Board

The Fridge - Mon, 04/04/2016 - 18:51

The nominations for Ubuntu Technical Board are, in no particular order:

  • Ben Collins
  • Kees Cook
  • Steve Langasek
  • Jason de Rose
  • Marc Deslauriers
  • Adam Conrad
  • Stéphane Graber
  • Mathieu Trudel-Lapierre
  • Didier Roche
  • Paul Sladen
  • Sebastien Bacher
  • Robie Basak

We are very fortunate to have such an excellent group of nominees, and I am confident that the Ubuntu developer community will choose well.

I’d like to thank both the most recent technical board, who have (literally gone well beyond the call of duty in their commitment to the stewardship of Ubuntu, as well as this group of nominees for their willingness to stand for this critical role.

I will ask the Community Council to setup and run the CIVS election in standard Ubuntu fashion, and wish all of the candidates the best.

I have done a rather bad job of the process this time around, taking far too long to firm up the list of candidates for no good reason, and so will ask the Community Council to run the TB nomination process next time, while retaining my short-listing rights.

Originally posted to the technical-board mailing list on Mon Apr 4 12:25:39 UTC 2016 by Mark Shuttleworth

The Fridge: IRC Council Election Results

Planet Ubuntu - Mon, 04/04/2016 - 18:34

Thank you all for your participation in a successful election process. Three candidates were chosen from a field of five for a two-year term.

The poll has ended and the results are available here: http://civs.cs.cornell.edu/cgi-bin/results.pl?id=E_c06586adb67f376b

Please welcome Unit193 to the IRCC and congratulate hggdh and Tm_T on their re-elections.

Also, please thank Na3iL and rww for their candidacy. I encourage them both to run again in the future.

The IRCC now comprises:

  • elky
  • Flannel
  • hggdh
  • Tm_T
  • Unit193

Pici’s tenure on the council is ending. Pici has been on the IRCC (this time) since early 2012. Please join me in thanking Pici for all his hard work and dedication.

Thanks again to everyone who participated.

Originally posted to the ubuntu-irc mailing list on Mon Apr 4 08:07:59 UTC 2016 by Neal Bussett

IRC Council Election Results

The Fridge - Mon, 04/04/2016 - 18:34

Thank you all for your participation in a successful election process. Three candidates were chosen from a field of five for a two-year term.

The poll has ended and the results are available here: http://civs.cs.cornell.edu/cgi-bin/results.pl?id=E_c06586adb67f376b

Please welcome Unit193 to the IRCC and congratulate hggdh and Tm_T on their re-elections.

Also, please thank Na3iL and rww for their candidacy. I encourage them both to run again in the future.

The IRCC now comprises:

  • elky
  • Flannel
  • hggdh
  • Tm_T
  • Unit193

Pici’s tenure on the council is ending. Pici has been on the IRCC (this time) since early 2012. Please join me in thanking Pici for all his hard work and dedication.

Thanks again to everyone who participated.

Originally posted to the ubuntu-irc mailing list on Mon Apr 4 08:07:59 UTC 2016 by Neal Bussett

The Fridge: Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter 460

Planet Ubuntu - Mon, 04/04/2016 - 18:20

Welcome to the Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter. This is issue #460 for the week March 28 – April 3, 2016, and the full version is available here.

In this issue we cover:

The issue of The Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter is brought to you by:

  • Elizabeth K. Joseph
  • Simon Quigley
  • Leonard Viator
  • David Morfin
  • Walter Lapchynski
  • And many others

If you have a story idea for the Weekly Newsletter, join the Ubuntu News Team mailing list and submit it. Ideas can also be added to the wiki!

Except where otherwise noted, content in this issue is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License BY SA Creative Commons License

Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter 460

The Fridge - Mon, 04/04/2016 - 18:14

Welcome to the Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter. This is issue #460 for the week March 28 – April 3, 2016, and the full version is available here.

In this issue we cover:

The issue of The Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter is brought to you by:

  • Elizabeth K. Joseph
  • Simon Quigley
  • Leonard Viator
  • David Morfin
  • Walter Lapchynski
  • And many others

If you have a story idea for the Weekly Newsletter, join the Ubuntu News Team mailing list and submit it. Ideas can also be added to the wiki!

Except where otherwise noted, content in this issue is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License BY SA Creative Commons License

Xubuntu: The small details: Shortcut keys

Planet Ubuntu - Mon, 04/04/2016 - 16:19

In this series the Xubuntu team present some of the smaller details in Xubuntu to help you use your system more efficiently. Several of the features covered in this series are new for those who will be upgrading from 14.04 LTS to 16.04 LTS. We will also cover some features that have been in Xubuntu for longer, for those that are completely new to the operating system.

Xubuntu comes with some useful shortcut keys by default. Using these shortcut keys can help you be more efficient with your daily work. Of course you can always modify them or add your own. Here’s how!

Default shortcuts

For convenience, some default application can be launched with shortcuts that use the Super key (usually the “Windows” key) and a letter associated with the task (underlined):

  • Super+E for the text editor (Mousepad)
  • Super+F for the file manager (Thunar)
  • Super+M for the email client (Thunderbird)
  • Super+T for the terminal emulator (Xfce4 Terminal)
  • Super+W for the web browser (Firefox)

You can find all the application shortcut keys from Menu → Settings Manager → Keyboard → tab Application Shortcuts. You can also easily Add new shortcuts from this dialog.

Ayrton Araujo: The last 3 *nix vulnerabilities you should be aware

Planet Ubuntu - Mon, 04/04/2016 - 14:15

First, your server and workstation should be all right if you have all the last security updates. So, there’s no need to panic.

Secondly, this is my personal option based on the daily things I have seen from the middle of the year 2015 to now. This post is for advanced users that handle many servers on a regular basis.

Let’s start with the micro review.

CVE-2016-0728 – The local privilege escalation vulnerability in the Linux kernel:

 

Privilege escalation vulnerabilities aren’t very common with GNU/Linux distributions. Especially because the daemons and process usually don’t run at the top of the root user.

Since Shellshock, we do not see big bugs of this type:

http://perception-point.io/2016/01/14/analysis-and-exploitation-of-a-linux-kernel-vulnerability-cve-2016-0728/

 

CVE-2016-0777 and CVE-2016-0778 – The roaming feature for SSH clients:

 

We see server sides vulnerabilities every time during the management duties. What about a client side issue that makes you vulnerable while accessing a server?

If you run SSH on the wrong server and have the UseRoaming feature active (that is, by default) someone could steal your SSH private key:

https://www.digitalocean.com/community/questions/openssh-client-bug-cve-2016-0777-and-cve-2016-0778

 

CVE-2015-7547 – THE DNS exploit

 

This one caused sleepless nights of many engineers in late 2015.

Considered the bug that caused the 3th worst DDoS attack to DNS Root Servers the history of the Internet it caused DNS resolutions errors for the most part of the planet triggering intermittent instability for internet service providers and hosting providers everywhere for months.

 

No more comments on this one:

https://blog.cloudflare.com/a-tale-of-a-dns-exploit-cve-2015-7547/

http://root-servers.org/news/events-of-20151130.txt 

Bonus:

This one is not new but started to be an issue again recently with the popularization of private networks accessible only via SSH Tunnels due to lack of IPv4:
https://www.clockwork.com/news/2012/09/28/602/ssh_agent_hijacking

 

Feel free to post at the comments your personal rank.

Thanks!

Jonathan Riddell: Plasma Wayland Image Update

Planet Ubuntu - Mon, 04/04/2016 - 08:31

It’s your fortnightly update to the Plasma Wayland image.  Rather pleasingly window decorations are the right colour and I can resize windows.

Now can anyone get the Ascii Art plugin working?

by

Raphaël Hertzog: My Free Software Activities in February and March 2016

Planet Ubuntu - Mon, 04/04/2016 - 01:56

My monthly report covers a large part of what I have been doing in the free software world. I write it for my donators (thanks to them!) but also for the wider Debian community because it can give ideas to newcomers and it’s one of the best ways to find volunteers to work with me on projects that matter to me.

I skipped my monthly report last time so this one will cover two months. I will try to list only the most important things to not make it too long.

The Debian Handbook

I worked with Ryuunosuke Ayanokouzi to prepare a paperback version of the Japanese translation of my book. Thanks to the efforts of everybody, it’s now available. Unfortunately, Lulu declined to take it in “distribution” program so it won’t be available on traditional bookstores (like Amazon, etc.). The reason is that they do not support non-latin character sets in the meta-data.

I tried to cheat a little bit by inputting the description in English (still explaining that the book was in Japanese) but they rejected it nevertheless because the English title could mislead people. So the paperback is only available on lulu.com. Fortunately, the shipping costs are reasonable if you pick the most economic offer.

Following this I invited the Italian, Spanish and Brazilian Portuguese translators to complete the work (they were close will all the strings already translated, mainly missing translated screenshots and some backcover content) so that we can also release paperback versions in those languages. It’s getting close to completion for them. Hopefully we will have those available until next month.

Distro Tracker

In early February, I tweaked the configuration to send (by email) exceptions generated by incoming mails and by routine task. Before this they were logged but I did not take the time to look into them. This quickly brought a few issues into light and I fixed them as they appeared: for instance the bounce handling code was getting confused when the character case was not respected, and it appears that some emails come back to use after having been lowercased. Also the code was broken when the “References” field used more than one line on incoming control emails.

This brought into light a whole class of problems with the database storing twice the same email with only differing case. So I did further work to merge all those duplicate entries behind a single email entry.

Later, the experimental Sources files changed and I had to tweak the code to work with the removal of the Files field (relying instead on Checksums-* to find out the various files part of the entry).

At some point, I also fixed the login form to not generate an exception when the user submits an empty form.

I also decided that I no longer wanted to support Django 1.7 in distro tracker as Django 1.8 is the current LTS version. I asked the Debian system administrators to update the package on tracker.debian.org with the version in jessie-backports. This allowed me to fix a few deprecation warnings that I kept triggering because I wanted the code to work with Django 1.7.

One of those warnings was generated by django-jsonfield though and I could not fix it immediately. Instead I prepared a pull request that I submitted to the upstream author.

Oh, and a last thing, I tweaked the CSS to densify the layout on the package page. This was one of the most requested changes from the people who were still preferring packages.qa.debian.org over tracker.debian.org.

Kali and new pkg-security team

As part of my Kali work, I have been fixing RC bugs in Debian packages that we use in Kali. But in many cases, I stumbled upon packages whose maintainers were really missing in action (MIA). Up to now, we were only doing non-maintainers upload (NMU) but I want to be able to maintain those packages more effectively so we created a new pkg-security team (we’re only two right now and we have no documentation yet, but if you want to join, you’re welcome, in particular if you maintain a package which is useful in the security field).

arm64 work. The first 3 packages that we took over (ssldump, sucrack, xprobe) are actually packages that were missing arm64 builds. We just started our arm64 port on Kali and we fixed them for that architecture. Since they were no longer properly maintained, in most cases it was just a matter of using dh_autoreconf to get up-to-date config.{sub,guess} files.

We still miss a few packages on arm64: vboot-utils (that we will likely take over soon since it’s offered for adoption), ruby-libv8 and ruby-therubyracer, ntopng (we have to wait a new luajit which is only in experimental right now). We also noticed that dh-make-golang was not available on arm64, after some discussion on #debian-buildd, I filed two bugs for this: #819472 on dh-make-golang and #819473 on dh-golang.

RC bug fixing. hdparm was affected by multiple RC bugs and the release managers were trying to get rid of it from testing. This removed multiple packages that were used by Kali and its users. So I investigated the situation of that package, convinced the current maintainers to orphan it, asked for new maintainers on debian-devel, reviewed multiple updates prepared by the new volunteers and sponsored their work. Now hdparm is again RC-bug free and has the latest upstream version. We also updated jsonpickle to 0.9.3-1 to fix RC bug #812114 (that I forwarded upstream first).

Systemd presets support in init-system-helpers. I tried to find someone (to hire) to implement the system preset feature I requested in #772555 but I failed. Still Andreas Henriksson was kind enough to give it a try and sent a first patch. I tried it and found some issues so I continued to improve it and simplify it… I submitted an updated patch and pinged Martin Pitt. He pointed me to the DEP-8 test failures that my patch was creating. I quickly fixed those afterwards. This patch is in use in Kali and lets us disable network services by default. I would like to see it merged in Debian so that everybody can setup systemd preset file and have their desire respected at installation time.

Misc bug reports. I filed #813801 to request a new upstream release of kismet. Same for masscan in #816644 and for wkhtmltopdf in #816714. We packaged (before Debian) a new upstream release of ruby-msgpack and found out that it was not building on armel/armhf so we filed two upstream tickets (with a suggested fix). In #814805, we asked the pyscard maintainer to reinstate python-pyscard that was dropped (keeping only the Python3 version) as we use the Python 2 version in Kali.

And there’s more: I filed #816553 (segfault) and #816554 against cdebootstrap. I asked for dh-python to have a better behaviour after having being bitten by the fact that “dh –with python3” was not doing what I expected it to do (see #818175). And I reported #818907 against live-build since it is failing to handle a package whose name contains an upper case character (it’s not policy compliant but dpkg supports them).

Misc packaging

I uploaded Django 1.9.2 to unstable and 1.8.9 to jessie-backports. I provided the supplementary information that Julien Cristau asked me in #807654 but despite this, this jessie update has been ignored for the second point release in a row. It is now outdated until I update it to include the security fixes that have been released in the mean time but I’m not yet sure that I will do it… the lack of cooperation of the release team for that kind of request is discouraging.

I sponsored multiple uploads of dolibarr (on security update notably) and tcpdf (to fix one RC bug).

Thanks

See you next month for a new summary of my activities.

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David Tomaschik: Women in Cybersecurity Summit

Planet Ubuntu - Mon, 04/04/2016 - 00:00

This past weekend, I was at the Women in Cybersecurity Summit in Dallas, TX, both recruiting for my company and copresenting a workshop on web application penetration testing. It was a real eye-opening event for me, mostly because it was the first security event I’ve attended where the bulk of the attendees were students or faculty. I had a great time and met a lot of interesting people, and it’s a very small event, which is something I’m not terribly used to, since I usually go to bigger events.

Talking with undergraduates was particularly inspiring – when I was an undergraduate, there weren’t programs at major universities focusing on information security like there are today. (Even if they insist on calling it “cybersecurity” for marketing reasons.) So many of the undergraduates (and graduates!) had a passion that you don’t see even in a lot of working progressionals, whose cynicism dominates their view of the industry. Also amazing is the level of research and innovation being done by undergraduates. I did some research as an undergraduate, and I know how exciting that can be, so I’m glad to hear of the undergraduates who are getting that opportunity. One student told me about her projects involving machine learning and insider threats, which just blew my mind. I was ecstatic to hear when other students mentioned doing research into censorship and mass surveillance – it’s critical that we get more people, especially upcoming professionals, thinking and working about these key issues.

I’m also hopeful to see more diversity in the security industry: diversity helps prevent group think, helps innovation, and ultimately brings more to the table. Though this conference was definitely light on the tech (compared to what I normally attend), I’m glad to see it succeeding and I hope to see the fruits of its labor next time I’m at another conference.

Randall Ross: The Original Bug, and Choice

Planet Ubuntu - Sun, 04/03/2016 - 22:41

Don't you think *everyone* deserves freedom?

I do.

    “There is a crack in everything.
    That's how the light gets in.”
    - Leonard Cohen

If someone says or implies otherwise, you can tell them I disagree.

Stephen Michael Kellat: Coming Events 20160402

Planet Ubuntu - Sat, 04/02/2016 - 12:45

I will apparently be in the pulpit speaking as the duty backup on April 3rd at West Avenue Church of Christ. Texts, as derived from Revised Common Lectionary, will be John 20:19-31 and Acts 5:27-32. I don't know if anything will be archived anywhere yet. I am scrambling somewhat to get something prepared. Normally there would be overhead graphics on Sunday morning controlled with wireless keyboards and the like.

No tech prep means no throwing tech together at the last minute. Instead we'll be going with prepared handouts as if I'm speaking in the woods again. Tools for use in preparing for tomorrow include:

  • LibreOffice
  • Evince
  • Firefox
  • PDF-Shuffler

Some day I may get fancy and prepare things in LaTeX. This is not that day. I do eventually want to start building documents in LaTeX, though.

Didier Roche: ubuntu booth and conferences at jdll 2016

Planet Ubuntu - Sat, 04/02/2016 - 10:00

The "Journée Du Logiciel Libre" are a very nice event in Lyon (France) over a full week-end where the public is invited to come, talk and assist conferences around free software.

Of course, the Ubuntu-fr team is present and have a nice booth here.

I'm also present and give a talk about snappy Ubuntu Core against a full attendance room!

Followed by an hour workshop more focused on developers. A lot of discussions and interesting interactions here!

That was a blast, thanks to everyone who attended! I'm still around tomorrow, do not to stop at the Ubuntu booth and have a chat!

Sujeevan Vijayakumaran: UbuCon Europe Plannings and Call for Contributions

Planet Ubuntu - Sat, 04/02/2016 - 09:00

It's been a while, since my first announcement about UbuCon Europe 2016 which will take place from the 18th to 20th November 2016 in Essen, Germany. That means: Mark your calendars! Check out our travel page on how to get to Essen! And finally: Submit your talks and ideas for talks or workshops!

While we were running the UbuCon Germany in the last years, we learned that many speakers picked a talk which were requested by the audience. So be sure to also submit your idea for a talk or workshop, which you would like to hear to idea@ubucon.eu!

We have a few talks already in our pipeline, sadly nothing fixed yet. I hope that we can announce the first speakers in the next weeks. If you want to join and help our team to organise the event, just send me an email (svij ät ubuntu.com).

More information are on UbuCon.eu!

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