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Kubuntu: Calligra 2.9.0 is Out

Planet Ubuntu - Tue, 03/03/2015 - 05:37

Packages for the release of KDE's document suite Calligra 2.9 are available for Kubuntu 14.10. You can get it from the Kubuntu Backports PPA. They are also in our development version Vivid.

Bugs in the packaging should be reported to kubuntu-ppa on Launchpad. Bugs in the software to KDE.

The Fridge: DMB [Developer Membership Board] election results

Planet Ubuntu - Mon, 03/02/2015 - 19:50

The DMB election results are now in: http://civs.cs.cornell.edu/cgi-bin/results.pl?id=E_7ce24ee3e589e440

Those have been reviewd by the DMB and accepted during our latest meeting.

This results in Benjamin Drung leaving the board and Mathieu Trudel-Lapierre taking his seat.

Scott Kitterman, Iain Lane and myself get to stand on the board for another 2 years term.

With my TB hat on, I’ll now take care of implementing the required changes (Launchpad, mailing-list and IRC ACLs).

The DMB would like to thank Benjamin for all these years of good service to the DMB and welcome Mathieu as its latest member!

Originally posted to the technical-board mailing list on Mon Mar 2 19:35:52 UTC 2015 by Stéphane Graber

DMB [Developer Membership Board] election results

The Fridge - Mon, 03/02/2015 - 19:50

The DMB election results are now in: http://civs.cs.cornell.edu/cgi-bin/results.pl?id=E_7ce24ee3e589e440

Those have been reviewd by the DMB and accepted during our latest meeting.

This results in Benjamin Drung leaving the board and Mathieu Trudel-Lapierre taking his seat.

Scott Kitterman, Iain Lane and myself get to stand on the board for another 2 years term.

With my TB hat on, I’ll now take care of implementing the required changes (Launchpad, mailing-list and IRC ACLs).

The DMB would like to thank Benjamin for all these years of good service to the DMB and welcome Mathieu as its latest member!

Originally posted to the technical-board mailing list on Mon Mar 2 19:35:52 UTC 2015 by Stéphane Graber

The Fridge: Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 406

Planet Ubuntu - Mon, 03/02/2015 - 19:33

Welcome to the Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter. This is issue #406 for the week February 23 – March 1, 2015, and the full version is available here.

In this issue we cover:

The issue of The Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter is brought to you by:

  • Paul White
  • Ian Nicholson
  • Elizabeth K. Joseph
  • Mary Frances Hull
  • And many others

If you have a story idea for the Weekly Newsletter, join the Ubuntu News Team mailing list and submit it. Ideas can also be added to the wiki!

Except where otherwise noted, content in this issue is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License BY SA Creative Commons License

Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 406

The Fridge - Mon, 03/02/2015 - 19:33

Welcome to the Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter. This is issue #406 for the week February 23 – March 1, 2015, and the full version is available here.

In this issue we cover:

The issue of The Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter is brought to you by:

  • Paul White
  • Ian Nicholson
  • Elizabeth K. Joseph
  • Mary Frances Hull
  • And many others

If you have a story idea for the Weekly Newsletter, join the Ubuntu News Team mailing list and submit it. Ideas can also be added to the wiki!

Except where otherwise noted, content in this issue is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License BY SA Creative Commons License

Lubuntu Blog: [Poll] Community wallpapers 15.04

Planet Ubuntu - Mon, 03/02/2015 - 08:38
The poll is up!

Cast your vote by choosing your 5 favourite wallpapers.

The poll will be up until 9th March, and the top five contributions will be included in Lubuntu 15.04 and packaged into the Ubuntu repositories.

We would like to remind everyone participating in the contest that your submissions must adhere to the Creative Commons ShareAlike 3.0 license. We have sent you a reminder on Flickr with instructions how to change your licenses on Flickr. Please change the license before 9th March, otherwise we are not allowed to use your wallpaper and must therefore disqualify your submission.

Please feel free to share the word and good luck to all contestants!

Milo Casagrande: Make nginx Return a JSON Response

Planet Ubuntu - Mon, 03/02/2015 - 01:01

This is more of a “write here so I do not forget” kind of post.

I set out trying to make a simple “maintenance” mode for a REST API (that speaks only JSON) without having to handle it in the code base.

nginx has a really cool support for maintenance mode that is dead easy to set up:

if (-f $document_root/maintenance.html) { return 503; }

Obviously, life is not that easy.
In my case, the same URL is used to show static content (the API docs) and only sub-dirs in the URL are used for the API resources:

api.example.net api.example.net/resource1 api.example.net/resource2

I already handle the API resource definitions in nginx, and I only need to override the root maintenance definition. In addition, the JSON response should also have the correct Content-Type header set.

In this case, is probably “easier done than said”, and is all done in here:

if (-f $document_root/maintenance.html) { more_set_headers "Content-Type: application/json; charset=UTF-8"; return 503 '{"code": 503, "reason": "Service maintenance."}'; }

The trick is in having the nginx_headers_more module enabled and installed in your system.

On a Debian based distribution, the module is in the nginx-extras package.

The post Make nginx Return a JSON Response appeared first on Milo Casagrande.

Sujeevan Vijayakumaran: Ubuntu Phone: A deep look into the bq Aquaris E4.5

Planet Ubuntu - Sun, 03/01/2015 - 09:30

Two years ago Canonical announced the project "Ubuntu Touch". A few weeks back they released the first phone which is running Ubuntu pre-installed. This article focuses on both: the hardware and the software.

The last time I have used an Ubuntu Phone is roughly 1.5 years ago on a Nexus 4. Since then many things regarding the system has changed.

The Software

Using Ubuntu on your phone is quite different from using any other mobile operating system like Android or iOS. The biggest difference is the big use of gestures which you can use from every edge of the display.

Scopes

If you turn on the phone for the first time you get a quick introduction how to use the Ubuntu Phone. Everyone who never used an Ubuntu Phone should not skip this introduction, because it really helps you to use the phone. After that introduction you can set a password or a PIN to lock your device.

If you press the power button, then you see the Welcome-Screen. There you see different information of your usage of your phone. That includes the number of sent and received short messages, number of calls and the number of taken photos and videos. You can swipe the Welcome-Screen to both sides to unlock the phone. If you have set up a lock mechanism, it will be shown there.

What are scopes?

After you unlocked the device, you see one of the scopes. Scopes are one of the special features of Ubuntu Phone. There are two types of scopes: aggregated and branded scopes. Both type of scopes show different information to the users. Branded scopes have an app-like experience. Aggregation scopes on the other side are bringing content from different sources to the screen. It's like a good summary of different sources.

Ubuntu Phone uses a different approach compared to other mobile operating systems. On Android or iOS you mainly have app icons and a few widgets in grids, while you have different scopes on Ubuntu Phone. The benefit is that the user does not have to go through all those apps if there are suitable scopes which are bringing the content easily to the screen.

Pre-installed scopes

If you unlock the device the first time, you see the Today-Scope. This scope shows you a couple of information of the current day. These are the current date, today's weather divided into morning, evening and afternoon including the temperature. Additionally, it shows today's appointments, the next holiday and a list of the last calls and messages.

After a swipe to the left, you reach the NearBy-Scope. This scopes aggregates different information from your current location. The scope shows the weather of your current position and a couple of other interesting information. It mainly uses yelp to gather the information. In the default setting it shows places of interest, restaurants or schools. This all depends on your current location. Additionally, it shows a couple of photos from Flickr and Wikipedia articles of your current place. A rather cool feature is that you can set your current mood. Depending on that, the scope shows different content. You can choose between "I'm Bored", "On The Move", "I'm Hungry", "I'm Thirsty" and "I'm Stressed". If you are currently on the move, you can set it to "On The Move" and it will show the next bus stop and railway station. If you click on one of those, it will launch HERE Maps and shows the way to it. Funnily the option "I'm stressed" displays shoe and fashion stores. On the other side "I'm Hungry" shows you a couple of restaurants right next to you.

The third scope is simple. It's just the app launcher where you find all apps in a grid. The apps are divided into two groups: commonly used apps and all the other apps. The commonly used apps are fixed: Telephone, Messaging, Contacts, Camera, Browser and the Clock. Using the drop down menu you can filter the apps using categories like Games, Social Networking or Productivity.

The fourth scope is the news scope. It displays news from different news pages like BBC, Engadget or Euronews. You can actuall configure the sources, but sadly you can only disable the given sources.

There are a couple of other pre-installed and pre activated scopes like the music, video and photo scope. All three scopes presents local content and content from the internet. For example, if you shot a few photos and videos and copied some music songs to your device, they will be shown on the scope. Furthermore, it shows different content from YouTube, Flickr, Facebook and Instagram. That all depends on the specific scope and accounts.

All described scopes are pre-installed and are activated when you turn on the device for the first time. There are still plenty of other scopes which you can activate when you swipe up from the bottom edge. There you see the names of all scopes in a list. You can activate or deactivate scopes by pressing the star on each scope.

There are many scopes which just cover different websites like BBC, cnet, Amazon, ebay, Reddit and many more. All these scopes are aligned to those specific websites. Consequently, you can search the website using the scope's searchbar. For example you get a few results if you search for items on the ebay or Amazon scope. The only thing is that you can't actually buy anything in the scope itself. It will just launch the browser.

Gestures

Next to the scopes, another noticeable thing are the system-wide gestures. On the right and on the left side of the screen you have two gestures which can be used globally in any app or scope. If you swipe from the left side, you can access the quick-app-launcher similar to the Unity app-launcher on the desktop. This can be opened when you do a short swipe. If you do a long swipe, you switch to your home scope. On the other edge of the display you can switch between the apps. Either you can do a short swipe, then you switch easily between two apps, or a long swipe brings you to a 3D overview of all opened apps. There you can close an app with another swipe or you can switch to the app by clicking on it.

On the top edge of the screen you can access the notifications and the quick-settings. In Ubuntu these are called indicators. The cool thing here is, that you can start swiping from a specific indicator. That means that you can swipe down from the battery indicator, which will show you the quick-settings of the battery. Same thing when you swipe down from the notification indicator. If you misplaced your finger you can simply switch to the other indicator by moving your finger to the right or left while swiping down.

The bottom edge of the screen does not have a global gesture. This gesture is based on the app you are currently using. The app developer can implement this gesture in their app.

Core- and System-Apps

There a several pre-installed apps which you need for your daily use of a smartphone. This includes the telephone app to place calls, the messaging app to send and receive SMS and MMS messages or the contacts app to organise your contacts. Additionally, there is obviously a camera app to take photos and videos. The camera doesn't have any special features but it can take HDR photos, tag your photos with your current GPS position or you can use the autotimer.

There is also a browser, which sadly doesn't have any settings. Therefore, you can only type in the URL of a web page, bookmark a web page and open and switch between tabs.

A pretty nice app is the gallery app to view your photos and videos on the device. The photos and videos are grouped by date. So you can scroll vertically to see the photos of different days and you can scroll horizontally on a specific date to see all thumbnails of the photos of that day. You also have the possibility to edit photos. This functionality is rather basic so you can cut details of a photo or you can automagically improve it.

The only available messaging app is Telegram. Other messengers like Google Hangouts, Threema, WhatsApp or Facebook Messenger are not (yet) available. The Telegram app is working completely, you can send messages to individual persons or to groups.

There are a few other apps which I don't mention in detail here, like the Clock, Music, Weather and Todo app.

All named apps are native Ubuntu Phone apps. There are quite many other pre-installed apps which are mainly packaged WebApps. For example WebApps for Amazon, eBay, Facebook, GMail, Twitter or YouTube. Some of them supports hardware interfaces or notifications. Twitter notifies you for every Twitter-mention or DM, GMail notifies you for a new E-Mail.

In the system settings you find the same settings you can also change via the indicators, but here you have a few more options. For example you can add online accounts for services like Evernote, Soundcloud, Flickr, Facebook, Ubuntu One, Twitter, Fitbit, Instagram, Vimeo or Google. Additionally, you can set the Date and Time, Security and Privacy and you find the Update-Manager for apps and the systems.

Ubuntu Store

The Ubuntu Store is the place where you can find apps and scopes for your Ubuntu Phone. You can download scopes and apps for free or there are also a few paid apps. To enter the store you need to log in into your Ubuntu One account. Currently (March 1st) you find more than 800 apps. One guy developed an unofficial website where you can search and find all items in the store.

Many apps are only WebApps. The quality varies strongly. Anyway you find a few good apps, like the Terminal to use the command-line on the phone. You also find an E-Mail-Client named "Dekko" where you can set up your IMAP account. This app is still in beta, so there are still a few basic features missing. You can't actually receive push E-Mails and you can't automatically fetch your mails. You can only fetch the mails manually. Another app is the calendar which isn't pre-installed. Like the contacts app you only have the possibility to synchronise your appointments using Google Calendar. "Fahrplan" is a nice app, if you are a frequent user of public transportation. You can plan and check your trip using this app.

The hardware

The bq Aquaris E4.5 has a Quadcore-MediaTek-CPU with a clock rate of 1.3 GHz. The display has a size of 4.5" with a resolution of 540x960 pixels. It has 1 GB of RAM and 8GB of internal storage which you can extend with extra 32GB by using a microSD card. The operating system is already using 2.5 GB of the internal storage.

The smartphone is 6.7 cm wide and 13,7 cm high. On the front side you have obviously the display, the ear cap, a front camera with 5 Megapixels and a notification LED. On the rear you find the 8 Megapixel Kamera with a Dual-LED-Flashlight.

The device is only 9 mm thin and weighs 123 gram. It is relatively light. On the bottom edge the device has the microUSB connection and the speakers. On the left side it has two microSIM slots and on the top you can insert the microSD card and you can connect your headphones.

The camera

The camera can take photos with a resolution of 8 Megapixel. If you take and view photos or videos on the device itself, it does look good, but if you view it on your computer then you see that the quality isn't really good. The colors are washy and even on pretty good lighting conditions the color reproduction isn't very well.

If you take photos on low light, you see many disadvantages of the camera. The photos do have a high image noise.

You should not forget that the phones price is only 170€, so you can't expect really good cameras in the phones in this price area. The quality of the photos is enough for some simple photos.

Haptics and Quality

The haptics of the phone is pretty good. The back cover is made of flat hard plastics with the disadvantage that it is a bit slippery. Also, the build quality is good, you can't hear any creaking when pressing the device on different spots.

I pretty much like the design. It looks like the phone is divided in two parts, because the front half is a bit smaller than the back half of the device. I'm using the device for three weeks now and the back cover doesn't have any scratches. Sadly the front does have some scratches. You can see and feel it on the border of the display. Even though the display itself does only have a few scratches, which you can only see when you have good eyes. Anyway you should avoid carrying the phone and your keys in the same pocket.

Overall impression

Ubuntu Phone as a system and the device are in a rather good shape with a few restrictions. You do need to learn to use the device which takes a while. But afterwards you might use the device easier and faster than other devices with another operating systems. At the start it's hard to use the correct gestures. Personally I managed to perform a gesture which I didn't want to do. Therefore, I often ended up in another app. For example this happened while swiping between all the scopes.

Basically the system is quite fast and doesn't have too many "minutes of silence". But the system does stutter a few times a day. It is extremely noticeable when swiping between different scopes and refreshing their content. Complete crashes of the full system don't really happen. There are mainly crashes when using scopes or apps.

I pretty much like all the Core apps which are in a good shape. As a developer, I see how native Ubuntu Phone apps should look and behave.

On a few spots you notice that the device or the system is rather slow. If you have taken a few photos and then you open the gallery app, it takes some seconds to display the overview. The gallery app slowly builds up the thumbnails and the overview. The same thing happens, when you are viewing the photos. Sometimes you have to wait up to five seconds to view a single photo.

Besides these issues there are many small other issues which you notice every day. Most of them can be fixed by upcoming software updates. The phone will get monthly updates. Even tough I already got two system updates in three weeks. One really annoying bug is the battery bug. The phone consumes a high amount of energy even if you don't use the phone. Therefore, the battery is empty quickly. The developers are currently working on a fix.

Conclusion

Canonical released the first Ubuntu Phone with bq. The hardware isn't too bad, even if the display doesn't have a high resolution. You'll get a device for 170€ from bq with a quite good build quality. The device and the system does have a few bugs, hick-ups and lags.

Anyway, I personally wouldn't recommend this device for end users because there are still many apps and scopes missing, to have a nice smarpthone operating system. This phone is mainly targeted for early-adopters, Ubuntu enthusiasts and developers. I hope the ecosystem around Ubuntu Phone will expand quickly. And anyway I'm really looking forward to the future improvements of Ubuntu Phone! Especially I'm waiting for the Meizu MX4 with Ubuntu pre-installed.

Milo Casagrande: Book Review: How Linux Works

Planet Ubuntu - Sun, 03/01/2015 - 07:47

Disclaimer: I received a free a copy of “How Linux Works 2n Edition” to review from NoStarch Press.

How Linux Works 2n Edition book cover.

I enjoy doing these occasional reviews: it’s a good excuse to read a new book, learn something new (there’s always something to learn, every day) and to move my eyes aways from a light emitting digital device (yeah, apart from when I actually write the review…). And since I fully read the books, that’s why usually it takes some time to review them all.

I have to admit I love NoStarch books: lovely cover arts, a nice book form factor, well written and edited content, multiple formats to choose from (paper, digital DRM-free versions). And “How Linux Works” is no less.

The Review: How Linux Works by Brian Ward

17 chapters strong, the book opens with a general overview of a Linux system providing the reader with a really clean explanation of the differences between the kernel space and the user space, moving to a quick overview of the shell system.

From Chapter 3, the pace changes, and it’s here where the author starts diving into into the real Linux system. Devices, device types, sysfs and how they are implemented at the kernel level are an introduction to concepts that will be taken further in Chapter 4, where file systems, a generic overview on how they fit into the kernel, and the most used and common commands to work with partitions, are introduced.

I consider Chapter 5 and Chapter 6 to be the strength of the book: how the Linux boot process works, what GRUB is, does and how to configure it, all clearly explained with detailed steps of the overall boot process. And then, as a natural consequence after the boot phase, the init systems are introduced and the reader is taken further into the user space land.

Chapter 6 covers basically everything that is needed nowadays to understand the init process: systemd, upstart and sys-v are all explained in their glory details (although the latter is the less detailed): how they are configured, where their configurations are located and the different terminologies each adopts are easy to understand.

From here on, the book covers all that is necessary: logging, users, /etc and login methods with a focus on PAM (Chapter 7); processes, resources, CPU & I/O and all the commands to help you in performance diagnosis (Chapter 8); network, network configuration, a concise but exhaustive introduction to the network layers, the kernel routing table and internet/network user space applications (Chapter 9, 10).

Chapter 11 takes us back to the shell with an extensive coverage of its most useful and used commands, that will lead as to know all the file sharing programs available at our fingertips (Chapter 12).

The remaining chapters cover the user space environment: startup files, desktop environment and window manager, D-Bus, CUPS; development tools (compilers, debuggers) and how to compile software.

Of all the book, I found these last chapters (counting also Chapter 12) to be the less interesting: probably because most of the concepts described were already known, or they were covering not (that) much interesting subjects to me.

In the End…

The book is really well organized, technically accurate and up-to-date with the recent modern Linux technologies. A really great Linux power-user book that doesn’t spend too much time in a graphical environment, but concentrates on command line tools and the depths of how a Linux system is glued together. Read it if you want to expand and deepen your Linux knowledge.

The post Book Review: How Linux Works appeared first on Milo Casagrande.

Riccardo Padovani: My opensource contributions in February 15

Planet Ubuntu - Sun, 03/01/2015 - 06:00

What a month for Ubuntu! First Ubuntu Phone has been announced and sales have started! Finally, after two years of work, we will have feedbacks from real consumers.

Also, on a personal level, it has been a great month. I went to London for the Ubuntu Phone launch. I did laser surgery to my right eye to correct myopia (I had 8 diopters), and in March I’ll do the left one. And I also had time to do some articles and a lot of code.

Stats

First of all, thanks to all you who follow me, this blog has a number of visitors I never expect. Without calculating who read articles on Ubuntu Planet or in a RSS Reader, this blog had 24,797 page views by 6,098 unique visitors in 28 days. Thanks to all! And I only wrote 4 articles!

Stats are calculated by CloudFare, I don’t have Analytics or others trackers on the site. It just counts the number of request it has.

Donations

More than visit, what astonished me is the number of donations: I had 3 donations for an amount of 30 euros! I’ll use them to buy a VPS, so thanks to all!

What I did

Now, it’s time to describe what I did in Feb. Considering the surgery, the uni and the journey to London for the Ubuntu Phone launch I’m quite satisfied for what I did.

Browser app

I started to work, with oSoMoN, on settings for the browser app. I haven’t a timeline for this, but we did some progress, and in next weeks we’ll land first branches.

This is a screenshot on how it will appear the first version when we’ll have implemented all features we want for the first land.

Calculator Reboot

We’re working hard to replace the default calculator with the new one, news on this side will arrive in next weeks

Reviews

I spent a lot of time this month reviewing code of other guys, mainly for reminders and docviewer app. Reviews are fundamentally for Ubuntu: every change to the code has to be approved by someone after a careful review: in this way we’re sure we have a good codebase and a good implementation of things. Reviews are very timeconsuming: you’ve to read and understand the code, then you have to test it and think how the change impacts the user experience.

Other than that, I did usual things: bug report, some code for ubuntu-it, promotion of Ubuntu on social networks, support on italian forum and on IRC and so on.

Have you ever thought to help the Ubuntu development? There are a lot of things to do, and you don’t have to be a developer: we need translators, tester, promoter and so. Try to take a look [here][contributions], and, if you have any doubt, write me. I’ll be more than happy to address you to the right place to start to contribute.

You know, I’m a student and I do all this in my free time. So, if you like my work and want to support me, just send me a Thank you! by email or offer me a coffee :-)

Ciao,
R.

Riccardo Padovani: Scopes are not widgets (they are better)

Planet Ubuntu - Sat, 02/28/2015 - 06:00

One of the thing I appreciate most on Ubuntu Phones are scopes: they are a totally new way to interact with contents. Unfortunately, after the presentation of the BQ Aquaris I’ve seen a lot of bloggers saying “Scopes aren’t innovative, Android has widgets for years”.

My first reaction was “C’mon, how could you say that? It’s obvious that you don’t have tested them”. Then I understood that, yes, we have to blame bloggers because they talk about things they don’t know, but at the same time we weren’t good enough to explain why scopes are so cool, and could be a game changer (but they still need some work, as I’ll evidence at the end of the post).

Scopes

Ubuntu’s scopes are like individual home screens for different kinds of content, giving you access to everything from movies and music to local services and social media, without having to go through individual apps.

I don’t have a Youtube app, but I can see the best of Youtube without going on internet.

Basically, they try to find the best result for your queries. This is one of the main differences with Android’s widgets: scopes have a search bar, and they update themself according to your search.

So I can see all Telegram messages I have about Ubuntu:

Also, sources of scopes (so where they take their informations) aren’t only installed apps, but could be anything: a website, an RSS feed, the scope itself, other scopes.

Another interesting feature is department: if you want you can split a scope in departments, to have filters for informations. So, in the scope about near points of interesting, I can look for taxis, or restaurants, or so on:

I hope it’s clear enough why scopes aren’t widgets. If we want to find a similarity in the Android world, scopes are like Google Now (but better).

Google Now

(I talk always about Android because I never tried a Windows Phone, or iOs)

Scopes are like Google Now because, without any query, they both try to provide us informations we need in that moment (on this side, Google Now is better because it has more informations about us).

But scopes will be better, because Google Now uses only one resource, Google, while scopes could use every resource on the web.

At the moment, scopes miss some things Google Now has, like Flights search, but it misses some things scopes already provide.

What? One of the biggest company on Earth doesn’t have something a little company was able to provide in just a couple of years?

Yes. Because opensource always wins.

And scopes are opensource, and could use any source they want. Google Now is integrated with every Google app. Scopes are integrated with every app. So with a scope I can search my Telegram messages, or my Evernote notes (not yet, but we’re working on Evernote scope).

But scopes don’t win only about integration with apps. They win also on (some atm, all in a future) searches. I love beers, so let’s try to search for a good Orval:

With a scope I have the result without have to open the browser.

Other than beers, I’m a developer, sometimes I need some documentation, let’s try to find how print works in Python.

A link to the documentation, thanks Google, very useful. What about giving me the documentation itself, as Ubuntu scopes do?

And I can go on on this way for a lot of things.

Okay, I hope is clear my point here: the concept of scopes it the same of Google Now, but scopes are opensource and more powerful, now we only need developers to implement them. Luckily, it’s very easy to develop them, as Carla wrote on her blog.

What’s missing?

Scopes are amazing, but I think they need a couple of things to became a gamechanger in mobile world:

  • Voice search: voice search is critical nowadays: the less I have to look to the screen, the better is.
  • Scope of scopes: one thing I miss a lot is a scope that do searches in all scopes and returns me the best results. At the moment I have to swype to choose the right scope (like, for beers, untappd): I prefer to do a search, without swiping, and have the best result.

But this is only the start of a great adventure. We have room to improve.

Because, remember, on long run opensource wins. Always.

Ciao,
R.

I made this article (and other opensource contributions) in my spare time because I love what I’m doing. If you are enjoying it and you want to buy me a beer click here.

Lubuntu Blog: Lubuntu 15.04 Beta 1

Planet Ubuntu - Fri, 02/27/2015 - 17:47
We’re preparing Lubuntu 15.04, Vivid Vervet, for distribution in April 2015. With this Beta pre-release, we are now at the stage of being semi stable. However pre-releases are not suitable for a production environment.

Note: this is an beta pre-release. Lubuntu pre-releases are NOT recommended for:
  • regular users who are not aware of pre-release issues
  • anyone who needs a stable system
  • anyone uncomfortable running a possibly frequently broken system
  • anyone in a production environment with data or workflows that need to be reliable 

Lubuntu Pre-releases ARE recommended for:
  • regular users who want to help us test by finding, reporting, and/or fixing bugs
  • Lubuntu developers

Read the release notes before downloading.

The Fridge: Vivid Vervet Beta 1 Released

Planet Ubuntu - Fri, 02/27/2015 - 16:16

The first Beta of the Vivid Vervet (to become 15.04) has now been released!

Pre-releases of the Vivid Vervet are *not* encouraged for anyone needing a stable system or anyone who is not comfortable running into occasional, even frequent breakage. They are, however, recommended for Ubuntu flavour developers and those who want to help in testing, reporting and fixing bugs as we work towards getting this release ready.

Beta 1 includes a number of software updates that are ready for wider testing. This is quite an early set of images, so you should expect some bugs.

While these Beta 1 images have been tested and work, except as noted in the release notes, Ubuntu developers are continuing to improve the Vivid Vervet. In particular, once newer daily images are available, system installation bugs identified in the Beta 1 installer should be verified against the current daily image before being reported in Launchpad. Using an obsolete image to re-report bugs that have already been fixed wastes your time and the time of developers who are busy trying to make 15.04 the best Ubuntu release yet. Always ensure your system is up to date before reporting bugs.

This Beta features images for Kubuntu, Lubuntu, Ubuntu GNOME, UbuntuKylin, Ubuntu Mate, Xubuntu and the Ubuntu Cloud images.

Kubuntu

Kubuntu uses KDE software and now features the new Plasma 5 desktop.

The Beta 1 images can be downloaded at:

http://cdimage.ubuntu.com/kubuntu/releases/vivid/beta-1

More information on Kubuntu Beta 1 can be found here:

https://wiki.ubuntu.com/VividVervet/Beta1/Kubuntu

Lubuntu

Lubuntu is a flavour of Ubuntu based on LXDE and focused on providing a very lightweight distribution.

The Beta 1 images can be downloaded at:

http://cdimage.ubuntu.com/lubuntu/releases/vivid/beta-1

Ubuntu GNOME

Ubuntu GNOME is a flavour of Ubuntu featuring the GNOME desktop environment.Vivid Vervet Beta 1 Released

The Beta 1 images can be downloaded at:

http://cdimage.ubuntu.com/ubuntu-gnome/releases/vivid/beta-1

More information on Ubuntu GNOME Beta 1 can be found here:

https://wiki.ubuntu.com/VividVervet/Beta1/UbuntuGNOME

UbuntuKylin

UbuntuKylin is a flavour of Ubuntu that is more suitable for Chinese users.

The Beta 1 images can be downloaded at:

http://cdimage.ubuntu.com/ubuntukylin/releases/vivid/beta-1

More information on UbuntuKylin Beta 1 can be found here:

https://wiki.ubuntu.com/VividVervet/Beta1/UbuntuKylin

Ubuntu Mate

Ubuntu Mate is a flavour of Ubuntu featuring the Mate desktop environment.

The Beta 1 images can be downloaded at:

http://cdimage.ubuntu.com/ubuntu-mate/releases/vivid/beta-1

More information on Ubuntu Mate Beta 1 can be found here:

https://ubuntu-mate.org/blog/ubuntu-mate-vivid-beta1/

Xubuntu

Xubuntu is a flavour of Ubuntu shipping with the XFCE desktop environment.

The Beta 1 images can be downloaded at:

http://cdimage.ubuntu.com/xubuntu/releases/vivid/beta-1

More information on Xubuntu Beta-1 can be found here:

http://xubuntu.org/news/xubuntu-15-04-beta-1/

Ubuntu Cloud

Ubuntu Cloud images can be run on Amazon EC2, Openstack, SmartOS and many other clouds.

The Beta 1 images can be downloaded at:

http://cloud-images.ubuntu.com/releases/vivid/beta-1/

Regular daily images for Ubuntu can be found at:

http://cdimage.ubuntu.com

If you’re interested in following the changes as we further develop Vivid, we suggest that you subscribe to the ubuntu-devel-announce list. This is a low-traffic list (a few posts a week) carrying announcements of approved specifications, policy changes, alpha and beta releases and other interesting events.

http://lists.ubuntu.com/mailman/listinfo/ubuntu-devel-announce

A big thank you to the developers and testers for their efforts to pull together this Beta release!

Originally posted to the ubuntu-devel-announce mailing list on Thu Feb 26 19:30:02 UTC 2015 by Elfy, on behalf of the Ubuntu release team.

Vivid Vervet Beta 1 Released

The Fridge - Fri, 02/27/2015 - 16:10

The first Beta of the Vivid Vervet (to become 15.04) has now been released!

Pre-releases of the Vivid Vervet are *not* encouraged for anyone needing a stable system or anyone who is not comfortable running into occasional, even frequent breakage. They are, however, recommended for Ubuntu flavour developers and those who want to help in testing, reporting and fixing bugs as we work towards getting this release ready.

Beta 1 includes a number of software updates that are ready for wider testing. This is quite an early set of images, so you should expect some bugs.

While these Beta 1 images have been tested and work, except as noted in the release notes, Ubuntu developers are continuing to improve the Vivid Vervet. In particular, once newer daily images are available, system installation bugs identified in the Beta 1 installer should be verified against the current daily image before being reported in Launchpad. Using an obsolete image to re-report bugs that have already been fixed wastes your time and the time of developers who are busy trying to make 15.04 the best Ubuntu release yet. Always ensure your system is up to date before reporting bugs.

This Beta features images for Kubuntu, Lubuntu, Ubuntu GNOME, UbuntuKylin, Ubuntu Mate, Xubuntu and the Ubuntu Cloud images.

Kubuntu

Kubuntu uses KDE software and now features the new Plasma 5 desktop.

The Beta 1 images can be downloaded at:

http://cdimage.ubuntu.com/kubuntu/releases/vivid/beta-1

More information on Kubuntu Beta 1 can be found here:

https://wiki.ubuntu.com/VividVervet/Beta1/Kubuntu

Lubuntu

Lubuntu is a flavour of Ubuntu based on LXDE and focused on providing a very lightweight distribution.

The Beta 1 images can be downloaded at:

http://cdimage.ubuntu.com/lubuntu/releases/vivid/beta-1

Ubuntu GNOME

Ubuntu GNOME is a flavour of Ubuntu featuring the GNOME desktop environment.Vivid Vervet Beta 1 Released

The Beta 1 images can be downloaded at:

http://cdimage.ubuntu.com/ubuntu-gnome/releases/vivid/beta-1

More information on Ubuntu GNOME Beta 1 can be found here:

https://wiki.ubuntu.com/VividVervet/Beta1/UbuntuGNOME

UbuntuKylin

UbuntuKylin is a flavour of Ubuntu that is more suitable for Chinese users.

The Beta 1 images can be downloaded at:

http://cdimage.ubuntu.com/ubuntukylin/releases/vivid/beta-1

More information on UbuntuKylin Beta 1 can be found here:

https://wiki.ubuntu.com/VividVervet/Beta1/UbuntuKylin

Ubuntu Mate

Ubuntu Mate is a flavour of Ubuntu featuring the Mate desktop environment.

The Beta 1 images can be downloaded at:

http://cdimage.ubuntu.com/ubuntu-mate/releases/vivid/beta-1

More information on Ubuntu Mate Beta 1 can be found here:

https://ubuntu-mate.org/blog/ubuntu-mate-vivid-beta1/

Xubuntu

Xubuntu is a flavour of Ubuntu shipping with the XFCE desktop environment.

The Beta 1 images can be downloaded at:

http://cdimage.ubuntu.com/xubuntu/releases/vivid/beta-1

More information on Xubuntu Beta-1 can be found here:

http://xubuntu.org/news/xubuntu-15-04-beta-1/

Ubuntu Cloud

Ubuntu Cloud images can be run on Amazon EC2, Openstack, SmartOS and many other clouds.

The Beta 1 images can be downloaded at:

http://cloud-images.ubuntu.com/releases/vivid/beta-1/

Regular daily images for Ubuntu can be found at:

http://cdimage.ubuntu.com

If you’re interested in following the changes as we further develop Vivid, we suggest that you subscribe to the ubuntu-devel-announce list. This is a low-traffic list (a few posts a week) carrying announcements of approved specifications, policy changes, alpha and beta releases and other interesting events.

http://lists.ubuntu.com/mailman/listinfo/ubuntu-devel-announce

A big thank you to the developers and testers for their efforts to pull together this Beta release!

Originally posted to the ubuntu-devel-announce mailing list on Thu Feb 26 19:30:02 UTC 2015 by Elfy, on behalf of the Ubuntu release team.

Shane Fagan: Interesting discussion and a potential suggestion from Blizzard

Planet Ubuntu - Fri, 02/27/2015 - 13:35

Last week's post got a lot of interesting discussion on reddit and phoronix which is pretty cool. The reception was mixed but the thing that I felt a lot stronger about was risk and reward and the idea came up in a different way yesterday on a change.org petition for Blizzard to port their games. Here is the quote for the interesting part:

https://www.change.org/p/blizzard-entertainment-support-please-release-n...

"Rachel has taken the time to check out this petition and is putting in a request for others high up at Blizzard to also check out the petition. They may also look in to using Kickstarter as a means to help cover the cost of creating native Linux clients for us."

The prospect interested me, so I went to reddit and asked what they thought about it but the main issue people were talking about was not trusting Kickstarter projects in general because they lack the assurances that you will get what you paid for. But the thing that struck me more about the entire situation was I started off by thinking sure id throw 50 euro into the pot and get all my games that I already paid for ported but the thing I was left thinking going to bed later that night was why not poll their users about how many actually use Linux? If I already paid for the games and other people have paid for the games too you are setting kind of a bad precedent.

What I felt the best way of doing the Kickstarter would be this, aim much lower than the cost of the port intentionally because they already have sales even if they don't count them because we use either Windows in a dual boot or WINE to play the games. It would be fair to do it this way. And secondly the Kickstarter would be just to pay for the Linux devs not for buying any particular games. In that way you would be just donating to get all your games ported. Lastly it would have to be a 1 off thing IMO I wouldn't want this happening every few months and I wouldn't want every developer coming to us looking to Kickstart their ports. The only exceptions I'd put to that rule though would be the biggest of the AAA titles, so like this post is about Blizzard games, Ubisoft, EA...etc.

I wonder if they would send it to a porting company as well. They have the devs for Mac obviously and they could port it but I wonder would a revenue share for the Linux versions of their games along with the Kickstarter and a little bit on top to account for potential previous users like me. To put some context I've spent 400 Euro ish on Blizzard games since 2000 and given the outcry from people banned from D3's launch on Linux I'm definitely not the only Linux user they aren't supporting with their games. So they definitely should seriously consider every option to port the game even if it isn't lucrative.

Tags: 

Ronnie Tucker: Full Circle #94

Planet Ubuntu - Fri, 02/27/2015 - 13:21

This month:
* Command & Conquer
* How-To : Block Calls, LibreOffice, and Using i2P
* Graphics : Inkscape.
* Linux Labs: BTRFS
* Book Review: Practical Data Science Cookbook
* Ubuntu Games: War Thunder
plus: News, Arduino, Q&A, and soooo much more.

Get it while it’s hot!

http://fullcirclemagazine.org/issue-94/

Randall Ross: Watch Jono's "Ubuntu: The Past, Present, and Future."

Planet Ubuntu - Fri, 02/27/2015 - 11:12

I just watched Jono's talk from SCALE [1] entitled "Ubuntu: The Past, Present, and Future."

It's really quite an interesting talk, so I'm recommending it to you, my dear readers. I think he did a great job describing the key moments in Ubuntu's history. (Click image to view.)

Towards the end of the talk, Jono makes some startling predictions. Do you agree with them?

--

[1] Just why people insist on naming a conference after a kernel still baffles and disappoints me. Do we name car shows after carburetors? Didn't think so. ;)

Kubuntu Wire: Very nice screenshot tour from softpedia

Planet Ubuntu - Fri, 02/27/2015 - 07:23

Softpedia showcases Kubuntu Vivid Beta 1 with a screenshot tour.

Daniel Holbach: Sometimes it’s so easy to help out

Planet Ubuntu - Fri, 02/27/2015 - 03:53

I already blogged about the help app I was working on a bit in the last time. I wanted to go into a bit more detail now that we reached a new milestone.

What’s the idea behind it?

In a conversation in the Community team we noticed that there’s a lot of knowledge we gathered in the course of having used Ubuntu on a phone for a long time and that it might make sense to share tips and tricks, FAQ, suggestions and lots more with new device users in a simple way.

The idea was to share things like “here’s how to use edge swipes to do X” (maybe an animated GIF?) and “if you want to do Y, install the Z app from the store” in an organised and clever fashion. Obviously we would want this to be easily editable (Markdown) and have easy translations (Launchpad), work well on the phone (Ubuntu HTML5 UI toolkit) and work well on the web (Ubuntu Design Web guidelines) too.

What’s the state of things now?

There’s not much content yet and it doesn’t look perfect, but we have all the infrastructure set up. You can now start contributing!

screenshot of web edition screenshot of phone app edition

 

What’s still left to be done?

  • We need HTML/CSS gurus who can help beautifying the themes.
  • We need people to share their tips and tricks and favourite bits of their Ubuntu devices experience.
  • We need hackers who can help in a few places.
  • We need translators.

What you need to do? For translations: you can do it in Launchpad easily. For everything else:

$ bzr branch lp:ubuntu-devices-help
$ cd ubuntu-devices-help
$ less HACKING

We’ve come a long way in the last week and with the easy of Markdown text and easy Launchpad translations, we should quickly be in a state where we can offer this in the Ubuntu software store and publish the content on the web as well.

If you want to write some content, translate, beautify or fix a few bugs, your help is going to be appreciated. Just ping myself, Nick Skaggs or David Planella on #ubuntu-app-devel.

Ubuntu GNOME: Vivid Vervet Beta 1 has been released

Planet Ubuntu - Thu, 02/26/2015 - 16:23

Hi,

Yet another successful milestone

Ubuntu GNOME Team is glad to announce the release of Beta 1 of Ubuntu GNOME Vivid Vervet (15.04).

What’s new and how to get it?

Please do read the release notes:
https://wiki.ubuntu.com/VividVervet/Beta1/UbuntuGNOME

As always, thanks a million to each and everyone who has helped, supported and contributed to make this yet another successful milestone!

We have great testers and without their endless support, we don’t think we can ever make it. Please, keep the great work up!

Thank you!

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